Corporate music – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 10:18:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://alabamabluegrass.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Corporate music – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ 32 32 Sri Lankan Baila Star Sunil Perera dead at 68 https://alabamabluegrass.org/sri-lankan-baila-star-sunil-perera-dead-at-68/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/sri-lankan-baila-star-sunil-perera-dead-at-68/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 15:32:43 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/sri-lankan-baila-star-sunil-perera-dead-at-68/ COLOMBO, Sri Lanka – In the end, it was only fitting that Sunil Perera, who had entertained generations of Sri Lankans on the radio and on the dance floor with his distinctive Latin American tunes, would sing along. On his deathbed in a hospital in Colombo, the country’s capital, Mr. Perera had requested a guitar, […]]]>

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka – In the end, it was only fitting that Sunil Perera, who had entertained generations of Sri Lankans on the radio and on the dance floor with his distinctive Latin American tunes, would sing along.

On his deathbed in a hospital in Colombo, the country’s capital, Mr. Perera had requested a guitar, but none was provided. So he turned to what could not be denied.

“The doctor told me that the day before he died he was singing and entertaining everyone there,” said Piyal Perera, Sunil’s brother and bandmate.

Mr Perera died in Nawaloka hospital on Monday, his brother said. He was 68 years old.

Although the cause of death is unclear, Piyal Perera said, Mr Perera was recovering from Covid-19 when he was rushed to intensive care.

Few of them have had such a big impact on Sri Lanka’s cultural and entertainment scene as Mr. Perera has for half a century. Often dressed in bright colors and wearing a fedora, he produced tube after tube through the Gypsies, the family group, which was preparing to celebrate its golden jubilee this year.

The gypsies specialized in the baila, a joyful and rhythmic genre sung mainly in Sinhala but influenced by the Portuguese, who colonized much of the island in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Over the decades, he has used his words and his voice to amplify concerns about Sri Lanka’s shrinking democratic space. The country, still recovering from years of civil war, has been beset by government pressure against journalists, activists and minority groups. Mr. Perera frequently attacked the country’s decaying political elite, which became bogged down in feuds and which he believed were dashing the nation’s hopes.

“He was both popular and a protester,” said Lakshman Joseph-de Saram, a film composer from Sri Lanka. “We rarely have a Bob Dylan and a Michael Jackson in one package.”

“He was,” added Mr. Saram, “our baila king.”

Tributes poured in after Mr Perera’s death, especially from politicians he had openly criticized. He directed his anger against the ruling Rajapaksa family in the country and against the opposition which repeatedly disappointed him with the chaos in its ranks.

President Gotabaya Rajapaksa called his death a “great loss”. Opposition leader Sajith Premadasa said Mr. Perera had “pioneered a modern revolution in Sri Lankan musical history”.

He was born Uswatta Liyanage Ivor Sylvester Sunil Perera in 1952 to a Roman Catholic family and grew up in the Colombo suburb of Moratuwa. He was one of 10 children of Anton Perera, a former soldier, and Doreen Perera, a housewife.

The eldest Mr. Perera built the Gypsies largely around his children. Sunil was a teenager when he joined the group and later became the lead singer. He described his father as a disciplinarian who had wanted him to complete his graduate studies, but supported his choice when he left school to focus on guitar and vocal training. In 2017, the Gypsies recorded a family tribute to their founder.

Sunil Perera’s stubborn lyrics and public stance set him apart from other top musicians in Sri Lanka. In his songs he dealt with corruption and embittered politicians after their electoral defeats. One song depicts aliens landing in Sri Lanka and declining an invitation to stay.

“It has been 72 years since we achieved independence,” he said in an interview. “We are in debt to the whole world. Is it the people’s fault? Whose fault is it? I don’t blame a group. I blame all the politicians who have governed us.

He spoke openly about his personal life, discussing what he considered to be hypocritical attitudes about sex in conservative Sri Lankan society. But his tongue has often got him in trouble, especially when he described women as “baby machines” in a discussion of the size of Sri Lankan families in his father’s generation.

His friends and family recognized that Mr. Perera could be a source of division. But they said his outspokenness came from his firm belief that Sri Lanka could overcome the ethnic and religious divisions that have led to conflict for decades. Piyal, his brother, said Mr Perera said what would make him happiest would be for his four children to marry in four different communities.

“His head wasn’t swollen with fame – it was simple,” said Mariazelle Goonetilleke, a fellow musician and friend. “He was not afraid to speak the truth, always said what he thought. There were people who didn’t like it.

Mr Perera fell with Covid-19 last month and was hospitalized for 25 days before being released, to be readmitted, this time to intensive care, days later.

In addition to his brother, survivors include his wife, Geetha Kulatunga; two daughters, Rehana and Manisha Perera; and two sons, Sajith and Gayan.

In a video message After his initial discharge from the hospital, Mr Perera appeared weak but determined as he thanked the hospital staff and his fans and supporters. He was dressed in a white shirt and a gray hat, his usual colors missing.

“We thank God for giving us such a crowd,” he said. “We will certainly get this blessing again. When we have that time, let’s meet again, like in the good old days.


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Kobalt Music Group – Manager, Corporate Finance (UK) https://alabamabluegrass.org/kobalt-music-group-manager-corporate-finance-uk/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/kobalt-music-group-manager-corporate-finance-uk/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 10:41:22 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/kobalt-music-group-manager-corporate-finance-uk/ Kobalt Music is recruiting a Manager in London to join the Global Corporate Finance team and be heavily involved in the Kobalt transaction process. Working alongside key negotiators, creative departments, and legal and business affairs, this role will undertake the investment appraisal of all catalog and business acquisitions as well as the signing of groups, […]]]>

Kobalt Music is recruiting a Manager in London to join the Global Corporate Finance team and be heavily involved in the Kobalt transaction process. Working alongside key negotiators, creative departments, and legal and business affairs, this role will undertake the investment appraisal of all catalog and business acquisitions as well as the signing of groups, artists and authors- composers.

Working closely with our leadership team, strategy, creation, and legal and business affairs departments, the Corporate Finance team will oversee all financial aspects of transactions, complete financial modeling, and assist with integration and post-closing analysis.

WHAT DOES A CORPORATE FINANCE MANAGER DO AT KOBALT?
  • Perform financial assessment and cash flow analysis
  • Build financial models to assess asset value and create investment memoranda outlining the proposed deal and providing recommendations
  • Help monitor trade performance and forecasts
  • Assist senior team members with catalog and business acquisitions
  • Financial due diligence assistance
  • Conduct industry and transaction specific research
  • Support the team with presentations
WHAT SKILLS AND EXPERIENCES ARE WE LOOKING FOR?
  • 3+ years of experience in an investment environment; investment bank, PE or VC, advice, intellectual property, investment management or with a large company
  • Strong numerical and analytical skills with the ability to interpret data providing meaningful and useful analysis for decision making purposes
  • Excellent command of Excel, including experience in preparing financial models
  • The ability to formulate opinions and discuss the merits and weaknesses of potential investments is essential
  • Strong communication and presentation skills, ensuring clear and accurate presentation of results to stakeholders
  • Ability to effectively manage multiple tasks, data entries and stakeholders under tight deadlines
  • Confident team player with strong influencing, facilitation and communication skills
  • An understanding and passion for the music industry, passion is an obvious bonus
WHY CHOOSE US?

At Kobalt, we’ve put creators first since our inception in 2000. Our music services and the technology we’ve developed help make the industry fairer and more rewarding for artists. Some of the biggest names in the world trust us like Childish Gambino, Akon, Freya Ridings, Paul McCartney and The Red Hot Chili Peppers and represent over 40% of the top 100 songs and albums in the US and UK. and are committed to defending diversity. We are dedicated to inclusiveness and provide all the resources and benefits you need to grow your career and reach your potential. We offer competitive compensation packages, professional development opportunities and an entrepreneurial culture that makes working here not only fun, but rewarding as well.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Applicants must be eligible to work in the UK. A full DBS check will be performed upon acceptance of the offer.

Kobalt is an equal opportunities employer and promotes diversity in the workplace. All qualified applicants will be considered for employment regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, disability, sexual orientation or any other status or characteristic protected by the law.


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Derek Jeter was a Hall of Fame shortstop from start to finish https://alabamabluegrass.org/derek-jeter-was-a-hall-of-fame-shortstop-from-start-to-finish/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/derek-jeter-was-a-hall-of-fame-shortstop-from-start-to-finish/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 23:49:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/derek-jeter-was-a-hall-of-fame-shortstop-from-start-to-finish/ Yet for it all, the Yankees have won so stupendously that Jeter has played exactly one home game in his entire career with the team knocked out of the playoffs: that last game in 2014. “I prided myself on being consistent, and when a game needed to be played, I felt like I was going […]]]>

Yet for it all, the Yankees have won so stupendously that Jeter has played exactly one home game in his entire career with the team knocked out of the playoffs: that last game in 2014.

“I prided myself on being consistent, and when a game needed to be played, I felt like I was going to play it,” Jeter said last week on a conference call with reporters. “And I maintain that my teammates also trusted me to play. So I don’t put much into it, because I don’t think it’s possible to be so successful as a team if you had someone who was so poor defensively.

Jeter played shortstop because his father, Charles, had played there at Fisk University in Nashville. Charles coached Derek in Little League and also played his son on second and third. A brief escape from the infield didn’t go well.

“I remember being really young and telling my dad I thought it was easy to play off the field, and he put me in the outfield, hit me with a few flying balls and I wasn’t very good, ”Jeter said. “So that was the end of the field experience.”

Jeter stayed shortstop, and only shortstop, until the very end. He stayed there in his first full professional season, with Class A Greensboro in 1993, when he made 56 mistakes. He stayed there in 2004, when Alex Rodriguez – the reigning American League shortstop, Gold Glove Award winner – joined the Yankees and rose to third place. Jeter broke his ankle diving short in the 2012 playoffs, costing him most of the following season, but returned to play 140 games on the field at 40.

“Derek was, I think, the most confident player I have ever played with,” said Yankees manager Aaron Boone, a former third baseman, who played alongside Jeter in 2003. wanted the ball , and just played the game with a ton of confidence. It didn’t necessarily mean he was the best of the best, but I felt like there was a real underlying confidence in what he was doing, and it helped make him even better. than it was.


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AGT champion show, outdoor fun, last GreenJackets home games https://alabamabluegrass.org/agt-champion-show-outdoor-fun-last-greenjackets-home-games/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/agt-champion-show-outdoor-fun-last-greenjackets-home-games/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 12:00:33 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/agt-champion-show-outdoor-fun-last-greenjackets-home-games/ What awaits you this weekend? See a young superstar perform in Augusta, attend an entertaining festival and enjoy several promotions in the last Augusta GreenJackets home games of this season. Here are more details on these and other festivities: Darci Lynne show Ventriloquist, singer and actress Darci Lynne presents her show “My lips are sealed […]]]>

What awaits you this weekend? See a young superstar perform in Augusta, attend an entertaining festival and enjoy several promotions in the last Augusta GreenJackets home games of this season. Here are more details on these and other festivities:

Darci Lynne show

Ventriloquist, singer and actress Darci Lynne presents her show “My lips are sealed (except when they’re not)” at the Bell Auditorium at 7 p.m. Saturday. Lynne, 16, was 12 when she appeared in Season 12 of “America’s Got Talent” in 2017 and was an instant hit, winning the competition.

Tickets to watch Lynne and Her Puppet Friends start at $ 29.75 at aectix.com. The show, originally scheduled for April 26, 2020, had to be rescheduled more than once due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Tickets for previous performance dates will be honored.


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Pueblo County Hall of Fame to induct 4 alum in 2021 https://alabamabluegrass.org/pueblo-county-hall-of-fame-to-induct-4-alum-in-2021/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/pueblo-county-hall-of-fame-to-induct-4-alum-in-2021/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 11:00:50 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/pueblo-county-hall-of-fame-to-induct-4-alum-in-2021/ The Pueblo County High School Alumni Foundation will induct four new members into the school’s Hall of Fame on September 30. Inductees include the late Elizabeth Villegas, Darrel Contreras, Russell DeSalvo and Ted Hernandez. A Hall of Fame ceremony will take place at the Pueblo Convention Center at 6 p.m., preceded by a social evening […]]]>


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Chinese tech companies are self-correcting to stay ahead of potential regulatory fury https://alabamabluegrass.org/chinese-tech-companies-are-self-correcting-to-stay-ahead-of-potential-regulatory-fury/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/chinese-tech-companies-are-self-correcting-to-stay-ahead-of-potential-regulatory-fury/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 04:07:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/chinese-tech-companies-are-self-correcting-to-stay-ahead-of-potential-regulatory-fury/ The logo of the Beike housing platform, owned by KE Holdings, is seen at the World Artificial Intelligence Conference (WAIC) in Shanghai, China on July 8, 2021. REUTERS / Yilei Sun / File Photo BEIJING, Aug. 11 (Reuters) – Fearing unprecedented regulatory heat for China’s tech sector, some companies are no longer waiting for official […]]]>

The logo of the Beike housing platform, owned by KE Holdings, is seen at the World Artificial Intelligence Conference (WAIC) in Shanghai, China on July 8, 2021. REUTERS / Yilei Sun / File Photo

BEIJING, Aug. 11 (Reuters) – Fearing unprecedented regulatory heat for China’s tech sector, some companies are no longer waiting for official reprimands that may or may not be forthcoming.

Instead, eager to get ahead of the authorities, they decided to “self-correct”, imposing restrictions or even moving away from their own businesses.

KE Holdings (BEKE.N), China’s largest matchmaking platform for real estate buyers and sellers, is one example.

This year, it quietly shut down its VIP services that promised quick turnaround times for real estate sellers in exchange for exclusive listings and featured prominently on its popular Lianjia and Beike apps, two people familiar with the matter said.

The decision to disconnect VIP services was not prompted by a regulatory request but KE, which is currently the subject of an antitrust investigation, had wanted to move “proactively” and “voluntarily,” said people who refused to be identified. because KE has not made its actions public.

“It wasn’t a big business but it had the potential to be,” said one of the sources.

KE said in a statement to Reuters that any trade adjustments on its part “were in line with government regulations and aimed at providing better services.”

The so-called “self-correction” promises to become a major corporate trend as the government tears itself through regulatory standards to promote socialist values ​​and curb what critics have called reckless capitalist expansion. The term is increasingly used by state media and its tone is similar to “self-criticism” – a practice promoted by the Chinese Communist Party.

THE NEW STANDARD

One of the most publicized examples was the decision by Tencent Holdings Ltd (0700.HK) this month to introduce new limits on the time children spend on “Honor of Kings,” its most popular video game. popular. It came just hours after his actions were beaten by a state media article which called online gambling “spiritual opium”.

“Everyone is trying to clearly understand the new normal and recover as quickly as possible,” said Jeffery Towson, host of the Asia Tech Strategy podcast and former investment professor at Peking University.

“No one is doing ‘go fast and break things’ anymore. No one is using their market power too aggressively. Everyone is aligning their strategies more closely with government priorities,” he said.

As Chinese regulators have cracked down on a range of industries from real estate to cryptocurrencies to private lessons, the tech sector has suffered some of the toughest measures to date.

Ant Group’s mega-list was canceled at the eleventh hour last year, while regulators in July ordered newly listed ridesharing giant Didi Global Inc (DIDI.N) to remove its app from stores in the UK. ‘applications in China.

A slew of antitrust investigations have also been launched, fines imposed, including a record $ 2.75 billion antitrust penalty for Alibaba Group Holding (9988.HK), while new guidelines and regulations have been introduced or are in the pipeline. preperation.

Other “self-correcting” companies include NetEase Music, which announced last month that it would not enter into exclusive contracts, a move after Tencent was barred by the Chinese market regulator from entering into legal rights agreements. exclusive author on music. Read more

Twitter-like Weibo (WB.O) also established an online list that ranks celebrities by popularity after a state media report criticizing celebrity culture.

“The brutal growth, disorder and greed of Chinese tech companies have caused a series of problems,” said Xie Pu, founder of Chinese tech website Techie Crab.

“This kind of ‘self-correction’ will provide a relatively healthy competitive environment.”

Reporting by Yingzhi Yang and Brenda Goh; Additional reporting by Julie Zhu in Hong Kong; Editing by Edwina Gibbs

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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By delaying the reopening of offices for just a month, it looks like businesses aren’t too concerned about the Delta variant. https://alabamabluegrass.org/by-delaying-the-reopening-of-offices-for-just-a-month-it-looks-like-businesses-arent-too-concerned-about-the-delta-variant/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/by-delaying-the-reopening-of-offices-for-just-a-month-it-looks-like-businesses-arent-too-concerned-about-the-delta-variant/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 14:26:46 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/by-delaying-the-reopening-of-offices-for-just-a-month-it-looks-like-businesses-arent-too-concerned-about-the-delta-variant/ Photographer: Peter Foley / Bloomberg © 2020 Bloomberg Finance LP A good hack for work and life is paying close attention to what people actually do and not just what they say. The narrative of the Delta variant scares both businesses and workers. The mass media gives the impression that we are heading for another […]]]>

A good hack for work and life is paying close attention to what people actually do and not just what they say. The narrative of the Delta variant scares both businesses and workers. The mass media gives the impression that we are heading for another round of closures.

Whether the new strains are a real long-term danger or not, large companies, across a range of industries, are reversing their previous plans to return to work. They are pushing back the deadline for employee returns. Studies continue to show that employees would do almost anything to stay working from home.

After being vaccinated and locked up at home, it was time to venture outside to see what was going on. I thought it would be an interesting survey to see how people react to the threat of the Delta variant in the real world, outside of social media. Would the fear, unhappiness and gloom heard on cable news and social media be ubiquitous on the streets? I got the family together for a little excursion and some market information gathering.

The first stop was a Modest Mouse concert with my son. The alternative indie rock band performed at a mid-sized former opera house in Philadelphia. Over a thousand well-behaved and polite fans stood crammed next to each other without wearing masks. No one seemed concerned about Covid-19 or the new strains.

Next stop was the Van Gogh immersive art exhibit on New York’s Lower East Side. Held in a large warehouse-type warehouse, hundreds of people entered and exited three large rooms. They sat side by side on the floor, watching a beautiful, animated projection of Vincent van Gogh’s works on huge screens.

We left and headed to Little Italy for lunch. Parking was difficult because there was so much going on. We walked into John’s Pizzeria, an old-fashioned pizzeria started in the 1920s. The place was packed with customers crammed into small tables, arranged near neighboring customers. Sitting by the window, we watched crowds of people go by on a lovely sunny Saturday afternoon. Few people wore masks. The small sidewalks forced people to walk closely together. No one seemed bothered. The atmosphere was positive and lively.

We drove through Greenwich Village, Soho, Chelsea and Midtown to get to the Lincoln Tunnel and back home. The streets were busy. People went about their lives without any semblance of worry. There was a sense of cognitive dissonance between what we get from news and social media and what is going on outside in the real world.

Former President Barack Obama threw a 60th birthday party and invited hundreds of guests. A DJ for the event took videos and photos of Obama and his guests, dancing without wearing their masks and clearly without social distancing.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot preached social distancing and mask wearing. When it came to generating income for the city through the popular Lollapalooza music festival, she gave the green light to around 100,000 young people to attend the concert. People were on top of each other.

Business leaders have felt the pressure to make return-to-work decisions. A big concern is the safety of their employees. If ordered to return too early and a worker contracted Covid-19 and give it to family and friends, that would be terrible in many ways. The company faces potential litigation and a public relations nightmare. The path of least resistance is to stay with the aloof model and allow people to come back only if they want to.

Amazon announced last week its intention to postpone the reopening of its offices to January 3. The online retail juggernaut was previously set to bring back its white-collar office staff by September 7. Beth Galetti, director of human resources at Amazon, said the company “will closely monitor the conditions related to Covid-19”. The majority of workers will not be heartbroken by the decision. In one Seattle weather survey, around 92% of Amazon employees responded that they would like to continue working remotely, at least on certain days of the week. This deferral concerns approximately 60,000 office workers. The overwhelming number of Amazon’s global workforce of 1.2 million is still expected to show up to work in Amazon warehouses and fulfillment centers.

Interestingly, the company that fell back the most was Amazon, which was run by Jeff Bezos, who also owns the Washington post, a publication leading the call for vaccinations and other health-related measures.

Another Seattle-based company, Microsoft, has also delayed plans to return to the office and said it will demand that workers be vaccinated. The tech company will delay fully reopening its offices for in-person work until October 4, after initially setting September 7 as the return date. According to a company statement, Microsoft will also organize housing for workers with health problems or who have a religious reason for not getting the vaccine.

Wells Fargo, one of America’s largest banks, was hoping to get its employees back to the office after the Labor Day long weekend on September 6. It will now be postponed to October 4, “given the rising rates of Covid-19 cases in the United States,” Wells Fargo said in a note to staff Thursday. “This deferral applies to U.S. employees who currently work from home and does not affect employees who currently report to work in person or participate in voluntary early returns.” The bank has asked its employees to “take advantage of the extra time off that Wells Fargo offers you to get vaccinated.”

Large fund management firm BlackRock, insurance company Prudential, Google, Facebook, Twitter and Apple have all canceled their plans for about an additional month.

If they were really worried, the postponement probably wouldn’t be another month. This seems to show that they’re not too afraid of the Delta variant and other strains wreaking havoc on people and the economy. The slight pullback appears to be a reasonable precautionary measure. If they were really worried they would have told everyone to stay home for the foreseeable future.


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Ballantyne golf course transforms into new community park https://alabamabluegrass.org/ballantyne-golf-course-transforms-into-new-community-park/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/ballantyne-golf-course-transforms-into-new-community-park/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 17:45:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/ballantyne-golf-course-transforms-into-new-community-park/ CHARLOTTE, NC – On the south side of Charlotte is a brand new park that you probably never knew existed. Over 100 acres of green space in Ballantyne was once a popular golf course, but has now been turned into a community park. What would you like to know The 130-acre golf course at Ballantyne […]]]>

CHARLOTTE, NC – On the south side of Charlotte is a brand new park that you probably never knew existed.

Over 100 acres of green space in Ballantyne was once a popular golf course, but has now been turned into a community park.


What would you like to know

  • The 130-acre golf course at Ballantyne officially closed in December 2020
  • Northwood Office took over the property and later turned it into a community park
  • Once a month they host a “Market at 11” event filled with free live music, food and activities for the public.

This is where you’ll find Deb Arbogast running her coffee business every second Saturday of the month.

“It’s so busy,” she said.

Before Arbogast entered the coffee business, she led a very different life.

“So I was a professional golfer for about seven years,” she said. “I’m used to motocross, and it seems like you both always need coffee.”

Once retired, she finally started her own coffee bar called Mud & McQueen.

But ironically enough, being on Ballantyne’s former 130-acre golf course, it’s closer to the green than most think.

At the end of December 2020, the golf course closed. It has since turned into a community park.

“We’re really trying to focus on making Ballantyne more urban, walkable (and) opening up the green space to make it more accessible to everyone, not just golfers,” said Hailey Rorie.

Rorie is the director of Northwood Office, the company that took over the property.

She says it’s all part of a bigger plan called Ballantyne Reimagined.

“In many ways Ballantyne, especially this property, was seen as a very corporate park, and we want to change that,” she said. “We want to become more of an 18 hour community.

From sunrise to sunset, people can go out and walk in the park. The park also hosts events with live music, food, and vendors once a month.

“When you think of Charlotte… the South Charlotte community, they haven’t really seen much of that… entertainment. Rorie said. “So I think you also pull from Waxhaw, Matthews, Fort Mill, Indian Land and people don’t have to go to the upscale neighborhoods or the South End to enjoy live music and events like this. -this.”

This new park not only redefines Ballantyne, but it also gives small businesses like Arbogast a chance to connect with more people.

The park hosts its “Markets at 11 am” from 11 am to 5 pm every second Saturday of the month.

You can find out more about the park and other events here.


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Five fantastic festivals that made us who we are https://alabamabluegrass.org/five-fantastic-festivals-that-made-us-who-we-are/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/five-fantastic-festivals-that-made-us-who-we-are/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 07:30:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/five-fantastic-festivals-that-made-us-who-we-are/ We took our freedoms for granted: the freedom to queue for food in a field. The freedom to complain about traffic, toilets or beer. The freedom to constantly miss the only groups worth seeing. The freedom to misspell common words like “witness”. These freedoms have been hard won. I should know, I was a freedom […]]]>

We took our freedoms for granted: the freedom to queue for food in a field. The freedom to complain about traffic, toilets or beer. The freedom to constantly miss the only groups worth seeing. The freedom to misspell common words like “witness”.

These freedoms have been hard won. I should know, I was a freedom fighter.

I remember the fight well. The guys beat a steady beat on the hood of my car and excitedly point their fingers at me as they say variations on “Howya Tom!” or “Look! It’s Tom Dunne. It’s not that unusual for it to happen when you’re making headlines and walking through festival town on the day of the festival.

I was not unhappy with this situation. I had a daughter with me and I couldn’t wait to get her to understand the scenario “in a group”. The singing was literally music to my ears. Sadly, she might not have been the right girl for all of this. Born and raised in Dublin 4, she might have been more comfortable in an article by Ross O’Carroll Kelly.

It is likely that she would never have seen people like these unless the television had accidentally been turned on for the game while her father was looking for rugby. Getting her into a Renault 5 had been a feat. She had only come to Thurles because she thought it was near Terenure.

It was very hot so I opened the car door. Outside, the carnage, or what we would now call “the drinking day,” was in full swing. In the absence of “designated seats,” people sat on cars, telephone booths, sidewalks, and against each other. In Insta’s absence, people simply had to eat their food and cover their faces.

My friend was starting to get angry. Next to us, a waiter had placed four slices of fresh bread on the path and was trying to butter them. The butter was hard as a rock and the bread kept breaking. He was taken aback.

My friend asked, “Is it all right in the head?” “Yes,” I thought, “more than you will ever know. When the traffic cleared, we pulled into the backstage. No tickets, no pass, no plan. These are my lasting memories of Feile ’90. They are etched in my heart forever. It remains my favorite festival. The queue, facilities and location are one thing, your friends and the craic is another.

And so, with all due respect to historians, it was, in my opinion, the holidays that made us who we are today.

1. Lisdoonvarna

I wasn’t there but it was almost the goal. You saw the reviews, you heard Christy’s song and you knew, deep inside yourself, that you had missed something major! It was FOMO before the invention of FOMO.

The key here was ‘camping’. This idea made your head spin: music, girls, tents and no parents. It was dizzying.

2. Féile

The real reason our ancestors entered the GPO.

Tom Dunne and Something Happens playing Feile 1990. Photo: Eddie O’Hare

3. Witness

For some a footnote in the story, for others the holiday Neanderthal the crucial missing link. Experimentation in places, queues and, above all, the spelling of simple words to suggest corporate sponsorship.

4. Oxygen

Everyone’s daddy. The multiple stages, the activities, the campsite. Oxegen, continued the tradition of misspellings and was the festival during which festivals in Ireland – and the new sector of independent radio – grew. It brought more bands to Ireland in a weekend that had graced our shores during some of the rough years of the 1970s.

5. Electric picnic

The festival iPad, the one we didn’t know we wanted until we saw it. He didn’t do anything new, he just did everything better: less crowds, better food, brilliant curation. Now we look back and think how did we live without it?

I must have missed a few. Who remembers Liss Ard, the small festival that first developed the idea of ​​“music in a beautiful place”, has now copied the country? And all together now, a reminder of what made the picnic so great.

At this point, there is almost one type of festival for everyone. Indie bands, surfers, literature fans, oldies, metalheads and all in between.

But when they come back, remember it wasn’t always like that. Some of us had to get in the Renault 5 and get there, stopping only at Foxrock for ice cream, a picnic basket and some nice drinks.


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From Puff Daddy to Puffy to Diddy to Love, Sean Combs reinvents himself yet again https://alabamabluegrass.org/from-puff-daddy-to-puffy-to-diddy-to-love-sean-combs-reinvents-himself-yet-again/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/from-puff-daddy-to-puffy-to-diddy-to-love-sean-combs-reinvents-himself-yet-again/#respond Tue, 03 Aug 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/from-puff-daddy-to-puffy-to-diddy-to-love-sean-combs-reinvents-himself-yet-again/ Combs says Belafonte was a role model for the type of activism he envisions for this next stage of his public life. “I was like, we were in similar situations. Do you know what I’m saying? Coming from where we had a position of power, being celebrities, and I was wondering, how [Belafonte] to sink […]]]>

Combs says Belafonte was a role model for the type of activism he envisions for this next stage of his public life. “I was like, we were in similar situations. Do you know what I’m saying? Coming from where we had a position of power, being celebrities, and I was wondering, how [Belafonte] to sink so much in [social action]? And by truly dedicating his life. He’s always dedicated himself to something. But as young Combs devoted himself to family, friends, and earning enough money to buy the kind of freedom he felt the world was denying him, the elder Combs devoted himself to making this happen. possible freedom for others. He says he walked through “history” and his own biography on his journey to the Age of Love. In this dig, he saw the stuff of someone destined to save his people. “The person who was able to go do Bad Boy, if he’s in charge of getting us together, that sounds like ‘He’s the good son of a bitch.’ “

I believe Combs. I also believe women in church who say God told them that someone else’s man is their husband. If they like it, then I like it. Yet if I could ask one thing of the women of the church, it would be the same thing that I tried to ask Combs with little success: I believe God told you that you have been chosen … but the did he tell everyone?

Sean “Love” combs is a man standing at the crossroads of many marine changes. He is a not-so-young man whose legitimacy as a cultural icon rests on his power to keep the culture of youth. The influencer culture took the prototypes that Combs helped innovate and blend business with social awareness. It is no longer enough to look elegant or create the new dance. Today’s celebrity must have a stance on climate change, white supremacy, LGBTQ + equality, and politics. Combs is also a father of a daughter. He has six children, including three 14-year-old daughters as we speak. He wants his daughters to inherit the keys to his kingdom equally with his three sons. Raising a trio of bosses brings a dad into the #MeToo movement. Combs looks back on the international playboy of his youth and on the near future where his daughters become young women. Most importantly, Combs is trying to do the brand iteration that made it successful in an openly hostile climate to what its brand represents. Combs’ “black excellence” is, in practice, a celebration of black capitalism. And, if you haven’t noticed, a lot of people have called capitalism the number one enemy. It is perhaps too fine a cultural wireframe for a diddy bop.

That won’t stop Combs from trying. He launched a diversity training program this summer with the mighty Endeavor. The six-week course is dubbed, after Combs’ style, “The Program of Excellence” and is designed to support aspiring entertainment executives from under-represented communities. It comes at a time when the entertainment agency model is being criticized for its lack of racial diversity. It’s part of Combs’ desire to use his platform for the collective good. But his understanding of what constitutes good may be at odds with the communities from which he draws some of his inspiration.

In the spring of 2021, Combs published an open letter to “American companies” in which it called on companies to increase their spending on black-owned media companies, claiming that “incremental progress” in ad spend parity is unacceptable. . Combs sees himself as the advocate for the black consumer in the “If you like us, pay us” missive. But critics were quick to say his appeal was hypocritical, in part because Combs owns Revolt, a cable TV network that courted ad dollars. Rapper Noname is the kind of artist that would have been hard to imagine during Puff Daddy’s heyday. Noname is a fiercely independent rapper who, along with other contemporary artists like Chance the Rapper, rejects the traditional contract with a label that is both artistic and political.

Former Bad Boy artists The LOX and Mase have publicly criticized Combs for trapping them in what they saw as unfair deals in the past. Black capitalism, argues Noname, wants Combs’ individual success to be celebrated as social progress. She said on Twitter that Combs “shamed white businesses for a capitalist business model that he almost entirely replicated.” This is not an isolated review. It’s a generation. Young audiences reject the uncritical boosterism of capitalism. And in a wider swath of pop culture, consumers are demonstrating a willingness to demand more from their para-social besties. This instinct is quite strong among young black audiences, many of whom have participated in the Black Lives Matter protests over the past couple of years. Hip-hop artists can still do a song like “Party and Bullshit”, that’s for sure. But they can’t do it without the audience wondering if the bullshit was consensual and if the party had a purpose.

For his part, Combs tells me that he doesn’t bother bringing in those who don’t agree with him. “I can’t get caught up in this. I know where my heart is, and you can’t do it alone with black people. You must have all types of allies. And that’s something I’m good at, I’m good at being a unifier, but I’m not going to be in a room with other tribes protecting themselves and making sure they’re straight and don’t not ensure that we are straight. But also, I’m not a politician, I’m not trying to be someone’s king or dictator. I am a boy from Harlem who came here for a change. We all have our story.

The story of Combs is a tale of Horatio Alger. He started from the bottom and now he’s here, so to speak. It was the story of a hero who made sense to know where culture was in 1999, even where it was in 2005. The 15 years leading up to the Great Recession of 2008 were a time of unbridled economic optimism. It was the era of turmoil, and the culture of black youth translated it into an ethic, identity and ideology. Lester Spence is Professor of Political Science and African Studies at Johns Hopkins University. In his book on black neoliberalism, he calls this hip-hop philosophy the “Can’t Knock the Hustle” mythology of modern black capitalism. This myth made sense in the year 2000, when black America, in particular, waged the war on drugs by squeezing every ounce of opportunity out of Bill Clinton’s expanding economy. Before financial bubbles burst rapidly in the 2000s, the stampede seemed democratic. Anyone with the right dream and the right grind could get away with this, sometimes literally but usually metaphorically. In 2021, jostling doesn’t sound like fun. It sounds like a chore, a set of coping responses to a hostile social order that has left millions behind. This kind of moment requires a different kind of story and maybe a different kind of storyteller. It’s not that unrest is dead, but that the valuing of the culture of restlessness is surely on the ropes. The hard core of hip-hop wants to debate the veracity of the scramble when predatory mortgages, student loan debts, rising rents, fixed salaries and surveillance police states choke the lives of even black lives, hopes black and black bustle. Combs reverently speaks of Black Lives Matter, calling it “part of the Black Renaissance” and truly “part of the Age of Love”.

“Her public face and her entertainment character don’t show what’s going on in her head and behind the scenes,” says Dalio. “It is not apparent how he uses his God-given talents, financial resources and network to make products that people love to buy, and then uses those resources to make the world a better place for the African American community.”


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