Corporate music – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 23:53:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://alabamabluegrass.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Corporate music – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ 32 32 Reviews | The challenges of keeping schools open https://alabamabluegrass.org/reviews-the-challenges-of-keeping-schools-open/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:30:09 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/reviews-the-challenges-of-keeping-schools-open/ For the publisher: Re “Don’t Close Schools Again” (guest op-ed essay, December 22): Essay by Dr. Joseph G. Allen fails to recognize a painful reality that will make it nearly impossible for many schools to keep their doors open during an Omicron wave: We don’t have enough subscribers. When teachers are inevitably infected, who will […]]]>

For the publisher:

Re “Don’t Close Schools Again” (guest op-ed essay, December 22):

Essay by Dr. Joseph G. Allen fails to recognize a painful reality that will make it nearly impossible for many schools to keep their doors open during an Omicron wave: We don’t have enough subscribers. When teachers are inevitably infected, who will teach during their absence? The shortage of substitute teachers is already forcing teachers to scramble to replace their colleagues when those colleagues or their children need to be quarantined. Teachers often do not have preparation time because they are covering unfilled vacancies.

As educators, we understand the impact that time away from school has on our students’ academic growth and on their mental and physical health. We have spent a good part of the last year trying to repair this damage. Dr. Allen’s adage “Schools should never close” would hold true in an ideal world.

But the sad truth is that if we don’t have enough teachers to teach, our schools will be forced to move to a virtual format. I hope that if and when this happens, society will not blame the schools. No one wants to close schools, especially educators.

Kerry Burke
Madison, Wisconsin.
The writer is a school counselor.

For the publisher:

I agree with Joseph Allen on the damage to children caused by school closures and the critical need for creative strategies to keep children in school and safe during the pandemic. His emphasis on health buildings – the use of ventilation techniques, reorganization of installations and air filtration systems to reduce the spread of microorganisms – illustrates such an innovative approach.

As a pediatrician I focus on healthy children and healthy families. I am sensitive to the intergenerational trauma experienced by the estimated at 175,000 children who have been orphaned or lost a primary caregiver due to Covid, and I am aware that children who contract Covid in school can pass it on to parents, grandparents and others at risk.

Since one of the most effective mitigation strategies to date is masking, I was therefore surprised by Dr. Allen’s recommendation of voluntary masking in schools. I have not seen any studies demonstrating the detrimental effects of masking on the quality of the educational experience of children.

Plus, the test-to-stay policies that Dr. Allen supports only work under masking. Why not implement all the effective strategies to keep kids learning and safe in school: masking, testing to stay, building improvements and most importantly, as Dr Allen said. , the vaccination !

Deborah Moss
Pittsburgh
The author is Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh and Past President of the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

For the publisher:

We all know that keeping schools open is essential for the educational and social growth of children. However, in downtown public schools, protocols are not in place to protect students and staff from Covid.

In New York City elementary schools, many students are still not immunized. Schools are overcrowded, so it’s impossible to stay socially distant. The infrastructure is archaic, with poor air circulation, and classrooms often go uncleaned. Random testing is done only with parental consent, so many children simply never get tested.

We are in the midst of a public health crisis and our schools should remain open, but only if health protocols are respected. So, Dr Allen, I invite you to come into my class, sit next to the unvaccinated students who cannot keep their masks on, and join them as they have their breakfast and lunch at their home. office. And maybe you should get tested after your visit.

Nancy lehman
Bronx

For the publisher:

Re “Scientists Urge President to Slash Nuclear Arsenal” (press article, December 17):

We congratulate the nearly 700 scientists and engineers whose open letter to President Biden draws public attention to the crucial issue of the administration’s upcoming nuclear posture review. Global nuclear weapons truly threaten the very existence of humanity, but are far too much of an invisible problem.

As good as the letter is, however, it doesn’t go far enough in what it asks the president to do. In early 2017, Joe Biden, then Vice President speaking on behalf of the Obama administration, gave a political discourse on nuclear weapons in which he said: “If we want a world without nuclear weapons, the United States must take the initiative to lead us there.” He added that “as the only country to have used nuclear weapons, we have a great moral responsibility to lead the charge.”

Since then, the threat of nuclear extinction has worsened; the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists reduced the nuclear clock to 100 seconds before midnight, as close as it was during the height of the Cold War. President Biden must lead the charge as he has proposed: initiate negotiations among the nine nuclear-weapon countries to simultaneously eliminate all of their nuclear weapons over the decade under perpetual, enforceable and comprehensive verification protocols .

It will take a monumental diplomatic effort, but we can do it. We need to.

Pierre Metz
Ira Helfand
Mr. Metz, Engineer, is a member of the Massachusetts Peace Action Nuclear Disarmament Working Group. Dr Helfand is the outgoing co-chair of International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War.

For the publisher:

Re “The Free Press Needs Our Help,” by Maria Ressa and Mark Thompson (guest op-ed essay, Sunday Review, December 12):

The best protection we have for capitalism and freedom in America is a free press. Over the past decade, greedy businessmen and investment bankers have taken advantage of the outdated business model of American newspapers, buying them out and draining their equity to invest in other companies.

Ms. Ressa and Mr. Thompson warn us that independent journalism is on the verge of extinction, threatening our freedom to express ideas without retaliation and our ability to stop the growing trend of authoritarianism globally.

Visionary leadership is needed from among the best, brightest and wealthiest in our community to form coalitions of influence to save independent journalism. Ms. Ressa and Mr. Thompson are rightly pushing for their international fund to support public service media globally. Another step here at home is to financially support a newspaper business model as a not-for-profit company, safe from poachers in capital markets, and with missions defined by the public interest.

With so many crises facing us in the world today, ask yourself if any of these threats will ever be understood or resolved without journalists finding out the facts. A free press is our best road map to truth and a common future. Now is the time to heed the warning and act.

Stuart Z. Goldstein
Township of Monroe, New Jersey
The writer has made a career in corporate communications for the financial sector.

For the publisher:

Re “In the early scripts,“ The Music Man ”included a disabled character” (Arts pages, December 15):

I read with interest Meredith Willson’s attempts to write a disabled character in her classic musical. It was not the first time that he sought an inclusive representation.

According to my research, NBC celebrated the opening of its corporate headquarters at Rockefeller Center in 1935 with a live radio broadcast. It featured congratulations broadcast by NBC stations across the country. Mr. Willson, then director of programs for the San Francisco branch, KPO, asked Etta Moten, the black actress and singer who had recently appeared in the films “Gold Diggers of 1933” and “Flying Down to Rio”, to read the message from KPO. Hers was the only female voice – and perhaps the only black voice – played during the festivities. When Ms Moten praised him for his foresight, Mr Willson insisted that he had simply chosen the best person for the job.

It was a gesture that Ms. Moten has never forgotten. Twenty-one years later, although still a few years before Mr. Willson enjoyed his “Music Man” fame, she devoted an episode of her Chicago radio show to him, placing him in his “Hall of Fame.” »Staff alongside Sojourner. Truth, James Weldon Johnson and Leontyne Price.

Catherine karlin
Manhattan, Kan.
The writer, associate professor of English at Kansas State University, is working on a book about Etta Moten.


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What our post-sales purchases say about our mood https://alabamabluegrass.org/what-our-post-sales-purchases-say-about-our-mood/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 05:24:42 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/what-our-post-sales-purchases-say-about-our-mood/ The pair hit sales ahead of a trip to the three-day Tabula Rasa music festival in Hamilton in the southwestern state for New Years Eve – a reunion event for their friends who haven’t been to a festival for two years. Zainab Ali, 29, bought new outfits for her whole family in Zara during this […]]]>

The pair hit sales ahead of a trip to the three-day Tabula Rasa music festival in Hamilton in the southwestern state for New Years Eve – a reunion event for their friends who haven’t been to a festival for two years.

Zainab Ali, 29, bought new outfits for her whole family in Zara during this week’s sales.Credit:Paul Jeffers

“We were going to get a $ 50 tent at Kmart or Big W, but they were sold out,” Brown said.

The couple ended up buying a discounted tent, air mattress, sleeping bag and sun hat from Aussie Disposals.

“It was pretty good – I wasn’t looking forward to spending hundreds of dollars on a tent,” Brown said. “I’ll probably have it for the rest of my life too.”

Personal clothing will top the list of the most popular items bought by Australians in sales, according to a Commonwealth Bank survey, which showed that 36% of all planned purchases are for wardrobe items.

Technology will come in second, followed by appliances and home furnishings in third, with buyers expecting to shell out an average of $ 557 each in sales this week, up 14% from what people say they spent $ 487 a year ago. .

While popular categories during sales tended to stay the same year over year before the pandemic, Ms Lamb said personal attire was generally not as high as this year.

Best friends Jen Osborne and Natalie Daniel, of Camberwell, were among those shopping for a new post-containment wardrobe during this week’s sales.

“I had shoes for the summer because last summer came and went and we were all nervous and didn’t do much,” Ms. Osborne said, speaking to Age in a bustling Bourke Street mall.

“Today I bought sandals, earrings to go out, dresses to go out,” she laughs. “And lipstick because every woman needs a signature lipstick.”

Ms Daniel, who like her best friend is a high-level executive in a corporate workplace, said she bought a new wardrobe during the sales because the dress code in her office had changed. away from blazers and heels during the pandemic.

Best friends Jen Osborne and Natalie Daniel spend their first shopping spree together at the post-Christmas sales at Bourke Street Mall.

Best friends Jen Osborne and Natalie Daniel spend their first shopping spree together at the post-Christmas sales at Bourke Street Mall.Credit:Paul Jeffers

“It used to be very corporate and a lot of heels. But what you can wear is different because it’s fallen off and you’re a lot more dressed up for your day, ”she said.

“So I bought some dress sneakers that you can wear with a nice dress and a denim jacket and wear them to the workplace – where you never could before. ”

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According to Commonwealth Bank survey data, men were looking to spend more on average than women ($ 646 versus $ 459) and parents with one or two children were expected to spend $ 731 on average.

There are other differences in sales this year – there has been a 25% increase in online sales this year compared to last year, and people tend to enter and exit stores faster with it. mask warrants in place, according to the association of retailers.

A spokeswoman for David Jones said brightly colored evening dresses, jewelry and evening shoes were among their bestsellers this week, along with colorful home goods, luggage and swimwear. lively.

Kmart also saw in-demand children’s, male and female swimmers, along with beach towels, toys, fans, drink bottles, and lunch boxes.

The Morning Edition newsletter is our guide to the most important and interesting stories, analysis and ideas of the day. register here.


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Business 2021 in Butte: optimistic, pessimistic and intermediary | Local https://alabamabluegrass.org/business-2021-in-butte-optimistic-pessimistic-and-intermediary-local/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/business-2021-in-butte-optimistic-pessimistic-and-intermediary-local/ DUNCAN ADAMS Butte’s benefits in 2021 have found ground in Uptown. Ongoing or completed renovations included: the O’Rourke building, the Curtis Music Hall building and the former Montana headquarters for NorthWestern Energy, a complex of buildings on East Broadway Street that will house Montana Studios. Joe Willauer, executive director of Butte Local Development Corp., celebrated […]]]>

DUNCAN ADAMS

Butte’s benefits in 2021 have found ground in Uptown.

Ongoing or completed renovations included: the O’Rourke building, the Curtis Music Hall building and the former Montana headquarters for NorthWestern Energy, a complex of buildings on East Broadway Street that will house Montana Studios.

Joe Willauer, executive director of Butte Local Development Corp., celebrated this work at Uptown Butte.

“We have continued to see an incredible amount of investment in Uptown,” he said, noting that work is continuing to finalize the Uptown Butte master plan.

He said a strong urban core benefits all of Butte-Silver Bow County.

Separately, Willauer noted that positive economic news has also occurred at Montana Connections Business Development Park. The park is west of Butte and near the junction of highways 15 and 90.

There were commercial expansions in the park in 2021 and the completion of a multi-million dollar project adding rail infrastructure.

People also read …

On a less positive note, the widespread staff shortage in the country in 2021 has kicked a herd of regional businesses like a 10-legged mule.

Willauer readily acknowledged that the region’s business challenges in 2021 included finding people to fill jobs. Some companies cut their hours or their vacancies because it was harder to find the right people to hire than to find a fine feathered snow goose in the Berkeley Trench.

“The biggest challenge is the workforce,” said Willauer. “It’s not unique to Butte.”

The Uptown Café eliminated dinner and focused on lunch after struggling to find the caliber of workers owners wanted.

Companies have tried to sweeten the pot to attract the kind of worker who would show up regularly and on time.

Town Pump spokesperson Bill McGladdery said the company had increased his starting salary and taken steps, such as signing bonuses on occasion, to attract new hires.

He noted, however, that Town Pump’s staffing needs are greatest during the summer months due to increased travel and tourism.

Other companies trying to hire and retain staff in Butte-Silver Bow County in 2021 include: Silver Bow Pizza Parlor, Mac’s Tavern, Lisac’s Tri-Stop & Good Tymes Casino, and The Derby Steakhouse.

A December 17 summary from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that Montana had about 42,000 open jobs in October, an increase of about 4,000 since September. The same report found that Montana had fewer people leaving their jobs in October, with 17,000, than in September, with 21,000 quits.

Nationally, according to the BLS, there were more than 11 million job postings in October across the country.

Jobs in Montana included a key position in this wintry state: Snowplow Operator.

Bill Fogarty, district administrator in Butte for the Montana Department of Transportation, reported in December that he had vacancies for permanent staff and seasonal workers focused on snow removal.

NorthWestern Energy, with Montana headquarters in Butte, has reported staffing issues.

“In 2021, NorthWestern Energy encountered new challenges in hiring certain positions, such as technology professionals,” said Jo Dee Black, spokesperson for the company.

“With more remote work opportunities available for certain industries, NorthWestern Energy is now competing for talent with a wider range of potential employers,” she said.

Black said that while NorthWestern Energy continues to be a preferred employer in Montana, some positions have taken longer to fill than three years ago.

“Our vacancies continue to attract qualified candidates,” she said.

Regional businesses have also battled the continuing impacts of COVID-19, including new strains emerging, and with supply chain challenges, inflation and high gasoline prices.

“In 2021, NorthWestern Energy experienced disruptions and delays in the supply chain as well as many other industries,” said Black.

“For example, equipment that typically delivered six weeks after being ordered, such as meters and voltage regulators, took three to eight months to deliver,” she said. “NorthWestern Energy continually monitors and adjusts the critical inventory of these types of materials to meet longer lead times. “

Black said materials and suppliers are subject to a range of market forces affecting cost and availability.

“For example, hurricanes impacted resin prices, which impacted the price of PVC pipes,” she said. “Increases in the prices of raw materials on metals such as steel, copper and aluminum, as well as petroleum and chemicals, have had an impact on many materials. “

NorthWestern Energy’s access to supplies has also been affected by a nationwide shortage of truck drivers. Industry observers differ on the number of drivers needed.

The American Trucking Associations estimate that the shortage of truck drivers will reach “an all-time high of just over 80,000 drivers” nationwide in 2021. Others suggest the number is around 20,000 .

Regardless, the shortage had impacts in 2021 on businesses large and small in Montana.

Black said NorthWestern Energy had been working with additional carriers to adjust to the shortage.

“Nonetheless, last year and through 2022 the sourcing and delivery of materials is a constant challenge and requires daily vigilance,” said Black. “NorthWestern Energy continues to use many strategies to deliver the materials we need to serve our customers. ”

Meanwhile, people remained interested in Butte and Anaconda real estate.

The Rocky Mountain Association of Realtors in Butte reported on December 14 that home sales in the area “have been the best in 15 years.” The association said 613 homes were sold in Butte-Silver Bow from January 1 to December, up from 2020 when 500 homes were sold. Anaconda-Deer Lodge County also saw an increase over the same period, selling 142 homes in 2021 compared to 110 in 2020.

Anaconda: The Forge and Murdoch’s

The County of Anaconda-Deer Lodge celebrated a new hotel, The Forge, and the hotel’s new home for Barclay II, an Anaconda restaurant long known for its steak dinners.

Anaconda also hailed the news in 2021 that Murdoch’s Ranch & Home Supply is planning to build a store on the eastern outskirts of town. On December 28, John Aitchison, construction manager for Murdoch’s, said the retailer was excited to continue with the project. He said Murdoch will likely innovate in the spring.

Of course, not all the news was good.

US Minerals announced the closure at the end of June of its Black Diamond dairy plant in Anaconda. The Illinois-headquartered company pleaded guilty in August in federal court to exposing employees to high levels of arsenic at its Anaconda plant, a violation of the Clean Air Act.

Meanwhile, Willauer said he feels optimistic about the New Year.

“We are certainly optimistic for 2022,” he said.

The same could be said of Ray Rogers, CEO of the Praxis Center, a medical simulation training center project that hopes to locate in Uptown Butte.

The $ 36 million project could create jobs and medical interns in Butte-Silver Bow County and be an economic engine for the community and Uptown.

In October, commissioners approved the closure of a block of Wyoming Street and its transformation into a plaza and green space if the Praxis Center becomes a reality at the corner of Arizona and Park streets.

If Praxis goes ahead, it will offer high-tech medical simulation training to rural health practitioners.

In a December 29 email, Rogers reported that things are going well with the development of the Praxis Center.

“In November, we opened a private placement for investors, and we were very successful in attracting investment from southwestern Montana,” said Rogers.

“We will continue to accept investors until early 2022 – interested investors can inquire directly through me,” he said. “We are approaching our financial targets and we hope that our financing will be completed by the beginning of 2022. We still aim to innovate in 2022.”

A private placement is a sale of stocks or bonds to a limited group of investors and institutions rather than on the open market. This is an alternative to an initial public offering for a company seeking to raise capital for a project or expansion.

Rogers was asked how he might respond to people increasingly skeptical of the prospects for the Praxis Center.

“The Praxis Center is a large and complex project that required the integration of many funding sources as well as more than a dozen key business partners and suppliers,” he said.

“This is a local Butte project, and we have worked diligently to make sure the Praxis Center takes place in Uptown Butte,” Rogers said.

“This project has been in the works for a long time and we are very close to the finish line. We would like to thank everyone who patiently and quietly encouraged us. Everywhere I go in Butte, people stop me and ask me how the project is going. The support has been overwhelmingly positive.


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In Saint Paul’s Square, promoters are working on the construction of a nightlife district in San Antonio https://alabamabluegrass.org/in-saint-pauls-square-promoters-are-working-on-the-construction-of-a-nightlife-district-in-san-antonio/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 18:21:44 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/in-saint-pauls-square-promoters-are-working-on-the-construction-of-a-nightlife-district-in-san-antonio/ San Antonio dance clubs are scattered all over the place. There’s Bonham Exchange in the middle of downtown and the Brass Monkey on St. Mary’s Strip. The Discotheque hotel and DZĪR are miles apart in the far north. Local builder David Adelman and his partners Michael Jersin and Don Thomas believe San Antonio should have […]]]>

San Antonio dance clubs are scattered all over the place. There’s Bonham Exchange in the middle of downtown and the Brass Monkey on St. Mary’s Strip. The Discotheque hotel and DZĪR are miles apart in the far north.

Local builder David Adelman and his partners Michael Jersin and Don Thomas believe San Antonio should have a nightlife district like Nashville and Miami and so many other cities. They are therefore working to create it, on Place Saint-Paul, a historic district just east of the city center which challenged past revival efforts.

In 2017, the partners became the dominant landowner in the neighborhood when they purchased more than a dozen buildings from Zachry Corp., including the Sunset Station rail depot with its iconic high vaulted ceiling. They then converted it to Espee, a venue that houses the 1902 nightclub, complete with a Prohibition-era design scheme and state-of-the-art lighting and sound equipment.


They recruited entrepreneurs to open new bars and restaurants such as Cuishe Cocina Mexicana and Toro Kitchen + Bar with the Cellar Mixology underground bar in its basement.

“San Antonio is a great city, but we don’t have a nightlife district per se,” Adelman said. “There are some pretty cool restaurants outside, some pretty cool bars outside, but people don’t know they exist. It’s kind of a collaborative effort among all tenants to transform that.

Saint Paul’s Square benefits from its abundant historical architecture and its proximity to the city center, the Alamodome and the convention center. The partners’ vision owes a lot to construction manager Bartell Zachry, who spent last year. Decades ago he saw the potential for an entertainment district there.

“It might have been a little early,” Adelman said, pointing to the recent growth in the downtown housing market. “But I think his vision was great. So now what we’re trying to do is hone that vision and take it to the next level.

Adelman and Jersin recently discussed their plans for the neighborhood, their methods of finding the right commercial tenants, and their thoughts on city council housing policies. They were joined by Moris Saide, a partner of the 1902 Entertainment Group which operates the 1902 Nightclub. The following has been edited for brevity and clarity.

Question: Do you think there is an appetite in San Antonio for a nightlife district?

Moris: Let’s move on to the economy of this formula. What we’re saying is what if we can get tourists to spend one more night in San Antonio? Imagine the Ubers, the meals, the accommodation, whatever they would spend if they stayed an extra night. So we’re trying to give them that excuse – here in 1902, and all around St. Paul’s Square.

San Diego, New Orleans, Nashville – all of these cities have nightlife or an entertainment street. San Antonio doesn’t have it. We need it.

David: I have no doubts that if we run right on all the properties here what the pearl is to food, what Blue Star is to art, I think the historic St. Paul Square can be to entertainment and entertainment. ‘experience. With the experience of food and drink, it’s not just the food you eat, it’s how you enjoy that food. It’s the dinner experience. If you go to Cuishe there is good energy. And Toro has a great energy and a great vibe.

Question: Apart from 1902, what else have you planned?

David: We are talking to a number of tenants. We are considering the possibility of having a private club, such as a Diamond Club, in one of our buildings. We see the private catering club starting to take off across the country, certainly for a younger set. There are private catering clubs in San Antonio for older people, but there is nothing for young professionals, and we think it can have a place here. We’re exploring a wine bar right now, a more casual type place.

We actually hired the CE group. They did a lot of the original planning and activations at The Pearl. They’re engaged with us, starting to think about what kind of property-wide activations we could do that would also draw people to this location. It can be a small-scale music festival or a food-focused festival.

Question: Do you expect the hospitality and convention industries to regain the strength they had before COVID?

David: What I hear from my sources is that the leisure industry has grown so dramatically that it has almost replaced the loss of business travel. Convention business, I believe, will come back entirely. I attended my first convention in the fall – I went to Chicago for the conference (Urban Land Institute). I wouldn’t pay a dime for a virtual conference. I am in the camp for a 100 percent return to convention business. I think business travel in general will be affected. I think a lot of people were able to move some of their trips with Zoom meetings, virtual meetings and the like, but I think a lot of those business trips will come back. Pleasure travel is what’s really on the rise, mainly because a lot of international travel is going down, so people are forced to travel within the country, and San Antonio has taken advantage of that.

Question: How do you go about filling the commercial spaces?

Michael: Having complementary businesses is really important. We believe in success with numbers, so it’s important to have multiple entertainment concepts where you can go to two or three places on each visit to experience something different. We are looking for unique opportunities, top notch operators. Even groups from out of town looking to come to town. A few of our prospects come from out of town and recognize this is a truly unique and exciting opportunity.

Question: Do you make an effort to get to know the owner of the business?

Michael: Yeah, absolutely. Some kind of understanding of their thought process. When we made this filling (from Toro), this is their second restaurant. These guys did an amazing job with a tapas restaurant and they’re in a bar downstairs. So we thought, “We would love to have one of your other concepts. They came in and they built the space themselves and did a great job with their creativity. They have the Midas touch with what they do.

David: I would say there’s a difference between what we’re doing here, which is hyperlocal, and what you see in the suburbs, where generally you’re going to have more channels. Therefore, this idea of ​​knowing these customers and choosing the right horses is really important. And I have chosen bad horses in my experience. Hope you learn from some of these mistakes.

It has certainly been difficult. I can’t tell you how many people said, “Yeah, but it never really worked. It was on the wrong side of the highway. You’re just going to be another failed effort. I have heard this so many times. But what you are seeing now is a new generation coming. I think that Bartell Zachry, whose original vision was to restore this and create an entertainment and nightlife district 30 years ago, was on the right track. He might just be a little early.

Question: What makes you think now is the right time?

David: Return migration to the central core. Previously, the only thing you had in the city center was that they were central business districts. They had no housing, almost exclusively. Now you start to see the accommodations move in. We don’t have enough, we don’t have enough. We need so much more. But we are definitely on the right track. From the time Julian (Castro) took over as mayor until now, we’ve probably added 10,000 people to the greater downtown area.

Michael: I think the other thing to mention is that we are creating a neighborhood, and there aren’t a lot of neighborhoods in San Antonio with unique offerings like the ones we have. The Pearl has done a tremendous job of creating a neighborhood; Southtown a. It’s going to have music, it’s going to have entertainment. We have a disco, we have venues. I think people today want to experience things differently than in the suburbs.

David: Ultimately, it’s about creating a vibrant, sustainable 18-hour city. We’re trying to be competitive, frankly, with some of the other cities that are on a roll, like Denver and Nashville, Miami, places like that. My great hope for San Antonio is that at some point the word spreads. I’m not sure people understand how awesome it is here. We do! I’m not even sure some people living in San Antonio know how awesome it is.

Question: We have a new city council with members who are critical of the city’s practice of offering market-priced housing incentives. Are you worried about this?

David: Yes, I am worried. It is portrayed as either / or when it should be both / and. They confuse affordable housing with market housing; we need more of both. One does not come at the expense of the other.

Question: They could argue that when you build market-priced housing, new residents move in and the neighborhood becomes more expensive, driving out old residents.

David: This is the basic argument of gentrification. The answer is that the most sustainable neighborhoods are mixed income neighborhoods. You want to do affordable projects and projects at market price in these neighborhoods. The people who own their homes, they are really great, they benefit financially. Now, culturally, there can be challenges to gentrification. We could probably spend about 10 hours on it. It’s super complicated and super contextual to the neighborhood.

I am of the opinion that I would rather see a city progress in terms of investment and renovation of these neighborhoods, rather than trying to restore them through social housing. There just isn’t enough money in the public sector to do it. And it is generally the jurisdiction of the federal government, not the local one. So if all the local government has the capacity to do is limit development, through a regulatory environment or a lack of incentives, then all they are going to get is more. nothing. This is what worries me.


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Recall of influential people who died in 2021 https://alabamabluegrass.org/recall-of-influential-people-who-died-in-2021/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 20:57:58 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/recall-of-influential-people-who-died-in-2021/ Akis Tsochadzopoulos, 82. A once prominent Greek socialist politician who held nearly a dozen ministerial posts for two decades but then fell out of favor, has been convicted and jailed in one of Greece’s most high-profile corruption trials. August 27. Ed asner, 91. The burly, prolific actor who rose to stardom in his middle years […]]]>

Akis Tsochadzopoulos, 82. A once prominent Greek socialist politician who held nearly a dozen ministerial posts for two decades but then fell out of favor, has been convicted and jailed in one of Greece’s most high-profile corruption trials. August 27.

Ed asner, 91. The burly, prolific actor who rose to stardom in his middle years as gruff but lovable reporter Lou Grant, first in the hit comedy “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and later in the drama “Lou Grant”. August 29.

Michel Constantin, 94. An Emmy Award-winning character actor who achieved worldwide fame playing the father of the bride Windex in the 2002 film “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”. August 31.

SEPTEMBER

Syed Ali Geelani, 91. An icon of Kashmir’s contested resistance against Indian rule and a senior separatist leader who has become the emblem of the region’s mistrust against New Delhi. September 1st.

Mikis Theodorakis, 96. Beloved Greek composer whose catchy music and life of political challenge have been acclaimed abroad and inspired millions of people nationwide. September 2.

George M. Strickler Jr., 80. A civil rights lawyer who fought to desegregate Southern schools in the 1960s and was kicked out of his teaching post at the University of Mississippi amid outcry over his work on behalf of the black clients. September 2.

Grand Ayatollah Sayyed Mohammed Saeed al-Hakim, 85. One of Iraq’s oldest and most influential Muslim Shia clerics. September 3.

Willard scott, 87. The beloved weather presenter who charmed viewers of NBC’s “Today” show with his self-deprecating humor and playful personality. September 4.

Jean-Paul Belmondo, 88. Star of the iconic French New Wave film “Breathless”, whose crooked boxer’s nose and racy smile have made him one of the most recognizable men in the country. September 6.

Sunil Perera, 68. A singer and musician who has entertained generations of Sri Lankans with captivating songs, but won their minds and hearts with his candid comments against social injustice, corruption, racism and the suppression of democracy. September 6. Complications of COVID-19.

Elizabeth Ireland McCann, 90. A Tony Award winning producer who has helped mount an astonishing array of Broadway and London hits including “The Elephant Man”, “Morning’s at Seven”, “Amadeus”, “Life and Adventures” by Nicholas Nickleby “and” Copenhagen. ” September 9. Cancer.

Abimael Guzman, 86. The leader of the brutal Shining Path insurgency in Peru that was captured in 1992. September 11.

Reverend Cho Yong-gi, 85. His founding of the largest church in South Korea was a symbol of the post-war growth of Christianity in the country before this achievement was marred by corruption and other scandals. September 14.

Norm Macdonald, 61. A comedian and former “Saturday Night Live” writer and performer who hosted “Weekend Update” when Bill Clinton and OJ Simpson provided comedic fodder in the 1990s. September 14.

Jane powell, 92. The bright-eyed, opera-voiced star of the musicals of Hollywood’s Golden Age who sang with Howard Keel in “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” and danced with Fred Astaire in ” Royal Wedding “. September 16.

Abdelaziz Bouteflika, 84. A former Algerian president who fought for independence from France, reconciled his conflict-ravaged nation and was later ousted amid pro-democracy protests in 2019 after two decades in power. September 17.

Georges holliday, 61. The Los Angeles plumber who shot a grainy video of four white cops beating black motorist Rodney King in 1991. September 19. Complications of COVID-19.

Hussein Tantaoui, 85. The Egyptian general who took over the country when longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak was forced to resign amid the Arab Spring uprising of 2011. September 21.

Melvin Van Peebles, 89. The revolutionary filmmaker, playwright and musician whose work ushered in the wave of “blaxploitation” of the 1970s and influenced filmmakers long after. September 21.

Théoneste Bagosora, 80. A former Rwandan army colonel considered to be the architect of the 1994 genocide in which more than 800,000 Tutsis and ethnic Hutus who tried to protect them were killed. September 25.

Georges frayne, 77. As the leader of Commander Cody and his Lost Planet Airmen, he enjoyed a cult following in the 1970s with party and concert favorites like “Hot Rod Lincoln” and “Smoke!” Smoke! Smoke! (This cigarette). September 26.

Bobby zarem, 84. A tireless and relentless entertainment publicist, with a client list that reads like a Who’s Who of a certain era: Cher, Diana Ross, Dustin Hoffman, Kevin Costner, Michael Douglas, Ann-Margret, Al Pacino, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sylvester Stallone and more. September 26.

Michel renzi, 80. During a musical career rich in history, he worked with Peggy Lee, Mel Tormé, Lena Horne and some of the other biggest names in jazz and pop, and was also for years the Music Director of “Sesame Street”. September 29.


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St. Louis County Company, Animals Bring Nurseries to Life | Local company https://alabamabluegrass.org/st-louis-county-company-animals-bring-nurseries-to-life-local-company/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/st-louis-county-company-animals-bring-nurseries-to-life-local-company/ They installed the animals outside for drive-thru events, and they took trips inside to punctuate special Christmas services. Tobler also supplied horses to Roman soldiers and sheep to shepherds to help them craft “Journey to Bethlehem” events, where groups walk through a series of outdoor stations that tell the story of Christmas. Churches typically provide […]]]>

They installed the animals outside for drive-thru events, and they took trips inside to punctuate special Christmas services. Tobler also supplied horses to Roman soldiers and sheep to shepherds to help them craft “Journey to Bethlehem” events, where groups walk through a series of outdoor stations that tell the story of Christmas.

Churches typically provide their own Mary, Joseph, and baby Jesus, Tobler said. But Cowboy Critters employees can take on the role of supporting characters if needed.

On Friday afternoon, Tobler set up a collapsible wooden enclosure outside the Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd and brought each of the animals in the Cowboy Critters trailer to a temporary enclosure. The group was warming up inside and the music floated faintly in the parking lot.

After the animals were tied, Tobler slipped a long green dress over her clothes, tied a white sash around her waist, and wrapped a purple headgear over her hair.

When the families started to arrive in the parking lot, they stopped to greet and take pictures with the animals.

“Very sweet!” exclaimed 10-year-old Margaret Mueller, stroking the miniature horse’s mane.

“She would stay here all day,” said her mother, Amy Mueller, before leading Margaret and her brothers, Gus and Hank, inside.


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Who invented the metaverse? https://alabamabluegrass.org/who-invented-the-metaverse/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 05:00:05 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/who-invented-the-metaverse/ This is an audio transcript of the FT press briefing podcast episode: Who invented the metaverse? Marc FilippinoHello from the Financial Times. Today is Thursday, December 23, and this is your FT News Briefing. [MUSIC PLAYING] Financial conditions in the United States remain historically relaxed, despite the Federal Reserve’s withdrawal from its pandemic stimulus. And […]]]>

This is an audio transcript of the FT press briefing podcast episode: Who invented the metaverse?

Marc Filippino
Hello from the Financial Times. Today is Thursday, December 23, and this is your FT News Briefing.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

Financial conditions in the United States remain historically relaxed, despite the Federal Reserve’s withdrawal from its pandemic stimulus. And US equity markets have surged this year, but a handful of stocks did most of the work. Besides, who invented the metaverse? Tech companies are investing billions in something that comes from an early ’90s sci-fi novel by Neal Stephenson.

Madhumita Murgia
But he was quoted somewhere saying he was just making things up, so we don’t really know how it ended up being taken so seriously by tech companies.

Marc Filippino
We’ll see how science fiction shapes the way we think and feel about robots. I’m Marc Filippino and this is the news you need to start your day.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

The Federal Reserve may be pulling out of its pandemic stimulus package in an attempt to fight inflation, but financial conditions in the United States, like corporate borrowing costs, are still near their peaks. weak never recorded. After the Fed meeting last week, there was only marginal tightening. According to Goldman Sachs, it is still very easy for companies to register in the public markets and apply to lenders for new loans. This shows the extraordinary levels of liquidity flowing through the global financial system, which means that there is no shortage of liquidity available for new transactions.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

This year the S&P 500 hit a record high after a record high, so you might think the stock market is in great shape, right? Well, take those layers off and things aren’t as sturdy as they might seem. FT US Markets Editor Eric Platt reminds us that the S&P, Nasdaq and other indices are not monolithic.

Eric platt
Just over two weeks ago there was a fascinating day when the S&P 500 fell. I think it was about two percent. And on the same day Apple, the biggest member of the S&P 500, it has more influence on that index than any other stock, actually rose 3%. And so this spread has been really pretty big and really unusual, considering all the big macro pilots you have in the market right now.

Marc Filippino
So Eric, are the S&P and the Nasdaq bad indicators? Are they misleading about how the wider market is doing?

Eric platt
It’s not that it’s not a good indicator, right? Because otherwise, what you would have to do is really look at the individual performance of each stock every day. And that’s quite a laborious task, right? The problem is, there are times when you see this focus and you see these clues and the stocks below moving in different directions. And I have to say, that’s not always a bad thing, right? Sometimes that makes a lot of sense if you know you have financial stocks and energy stocks are really lagging behind. But you know, consumers and the values ​​of transportation and industry are recovering. And I hope at least more than half of the index is picking up, which would, you know, go up. But if you’ve just watched the S&P 500 this year, you’ve missed a lot.

Marc Filippino
Eric Platt is the FT’s U.S. Markets Editor.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

This year, a new word has exploded into the mainstream: metaverse. Companies like Facebook spend billions to create virtual worlds where people can live online and use services as avatars. Facebook even changed its name to Meta, and it all made our European tech correspondent Madhumita Murgia wonder where the word came from. She is joining me now. Hey, Madhu.

Madhumita Murgia
Hey. Hi Mark.

Marc Filippino
So where does this word metaverse come from?

Madhumita Murgia
So I found out that the word metaverse had been coined or that the term had been coined in Snow accident, a science fiction novel by Neil Stephenson from 1992. It’s funny because I was looking for why he created this, because he inspired so many tech luminaries like Jeff Bezos. But he was quoted somewhere saying he was just making up stuff. So, you know, we don’t really know how this was taken seriously by tech companies, but it originally came out of his novel.

Marc Filippino
Thus, in this new technological frontier, Facebook and Microsoft are investing billions of dollars in development. It came from a work of fiction. But I guess that doesn’t sound surprising, does it?

Madhumita Murgia
Yeah, I mean, exactly because the whole idea sounds really fictional and like, you know, like we’re talking about living in a video game, but they really take it seriously. And like you said, you know, Facebook is investing tens of billions of dollars in that and even Microsoft, which is a lot more laid back and a little more practical and the way it does business, they’ve already built in some form. of that in Teams, which is, you know, their workplace communication and productivity software. So that’s what’s happening. But the question is how quickly it will be adopted.

Marc Filippino
So Madhu, you and I talked about how fiction affects technology, but it also affects popular perceptions of technology, especially when it comes to artificial intelligence. What did you learn about it?

Madhumita Murgia
Yeah, I thought it was really interesting because I had a conversation with a researcher called Kanta Dihal, she’s in Cambridge, and she runs a program called AI Narratives, looking at that across all different cultures. And most research shows that the West’s attitudes towards futuristic technology, especially AI, mostly come from a few sci-fi movies, mostly The Terminator.

[FILM CLIP PLAYING]

Madhumita Murgia
That kind of Frankenstein monster that’s invading the world. And it also shapes our kind of fear of these robots and our kind of fear that humanity will be wiped out by them.

[FILM CLIP PLAYING]

Marc Filippino
And then there’s Hal, the robot in 2001: A Space Odyssey, which ends up turning against humans. So like, robots are just kind of really bad people.

Madhumita Murgia
Well, exactly. And also, and also the fact that, you know, once they become conscious and intelligent, then by necessity they destroy the human race. It’s just kind of a narrative that comes up over and over again.

Marc Filippino
Note that it is in the West or at least in the United States. You know, you pointed out in your article that Japan has a very different relationship with robots. And you’ve written about the classic sci-fi animated series in Japan, which really changed attitudes in a very different way.

Madhumita Murgia
There were two animated series, Astro boy and Doraemon, and both were extremely popular and influenced many generations of Japanese opinions.

[ASTRO BOY CLIP PLAYING]

Madhumita Murgia
Astro boy was a happy little android living alongside humans and Doraemon was a cat. These are just much cuter pictures. The stories were, you know, of these characters helping humans, saving humans, and that kind of has an impact on how people see AI as something that can help them.

Marc Filippino
What about China? What influence has science fiction had on Chinese attitudes? And you know, how is it different from the West in Japan?

Madhumita Murgia
It is really fascinating. So you know I got interested because there is such a powerful culture and ubiquitous high tech culture now in China and the lifestyle genre is so permeated with the digital world. So I was really curious about how their attitudes were affected, and spoke with Chen Qiufan, who is a well-known science fiction writer who has appeared in recent years. And he said historically, you know, Chinese attitudes were just influenced by western pop culture and western science fiction. And he grew up himself, you know, reading Philip K. Dick and so on. But this new wave of sci-fi writers is really focused on the social issues that have grown out of this kind of pervasive surveillance culture in China, especially private companies, you know, where things like WeChat, you get it. Consistently use for everything from food delivery to education to transportation.

Marc Filippino
You made an interesting point in your article that entrepreneurs often take the ideas of sci-fi writers, but not their warnings. What did you mean by that?

Madhumita Murgia
I think it’s really interesting the disconnect I found talking to writers and then looking at what’s being said in the real world of business by business leaders. Really, a lot of science fiction like, for example, even if we watch Snow accident, and then when I was talking to Chen about his job, there was a feeling of dystopia. There is a sort of warning about the direction in which we are moving as a humanity. You know, none of that, it’s not, you know, festive and positive that we’re all going to be living in this virtual world and it’s going to be awesome. There are warnings in there about what this means for humanity and how we are going to lose the core of who we are. Yet that is completely absent, I thought, from this conversation we have in the real world.

Marc Filippino
Madhumita Murgia is the European technical correspondent for FT. Thanks, Madhu.

Madhumita Murgia
Thank you.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

Marc Filippino
Before leaving, this Saturday, Christmas Day, the most ambitious telescope ever built is expected to be fired into space. The $ 10 billion James Webb Space Telescope has been in the works for three decades. It will orbit four times farther than the Moon is from Earth, and it will take photos of the very first stars and galaxies formed at cosmic dawn. It’s about 200 million years after the Big Bang. Let’s see what science fiction writers think about it.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

You can read more about all of these stories at FT.com. This has been your daily FT News briefing. We’re taking away the rest of 2021. We want to thank you for making this one hell of a year for us. Happy holidays, and we’ll catch up with you in 2022. The FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and me, Marc Filippino. Our editor is Jess Smith. We’ve had help this week from Joanna Kao, George Drake Jr., Peter Barber, and Gavin Kallmann. Our executive producer is Topher Forhecz. Cheryl Brumley is the FT’s Global Head of Audio, and our theme song is from Metaphor Music. We also want to give special thanks to Michael Bruning. You never hear his voice, but he’s been editing scripts for this podcast since day one. He is sadly leaving the Financial Times and will be sadly missed. Thank you Michel and best wishes from all of us.

This transcript was generated automatically. If by any chance there is an error, please send the details for correction to: typo@ft.com. We will do our best to make the change as soon as possible.


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“Christmas on Death Row” and a Stormy Season for Historic Rap Label https://alabamabluegrass.org/christmas-on-death-row-and-a-stormy-season-for-historic-rap-label/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 13:55:08 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/christmas-on-death-row-and-a-stormy-season-for-historic-rap-label/ “Christmas on Death Row” broke the streak. Starting with Dr. Dre’s “The Chronic” in 1992, every album released by Death Row Records went at least platinum, but the gangster rap label’s vacation album wasn’t exactly a huge hit. The LP – containing rap tracks with Snoop Dogg, OFTB and Tha Dogg Pound surrounded by seasonal […]]]>

“Christmas on Death Row” broke the streak. Starting with Dr. Dre’s “The Chronic” in 1992, every album released by Death Row Records went at least platinum, but the gangster rap label’s vacation album wasn’t exactly a huge hit. The LP – containing rap tracks with Snoop Dogg, OFTB and Tha Dogg Pound surrounded by seasonal favorites performed by the artists who sang the hooks of Death Row hip-hop releases – didn’t even go gold when when it was released in 1996.

If the LP has not been successful, it should not be reduced to a novelty. “Christmas on Death Row” has more to it than its title suggests – and the story of its creation speaks volumes about a crucial chapter in the history of one of hip-hop’s most famous labels.

But first: how was this record even made?

Rap songs about the holidays had already been released. “Christmas Rappin ‘” by Kurtis Blow was the first hip-hop record on a major label when Mercury released it in 1979, and “Xmas Rap” by the Treacherous Three, “Cold Chillin ‘Christmas” by Juice Crew and the Touchstone of Run-DMC “Christmas in Hollis” followed. The full album “A LaFace Family Christmas” arrived in 1993 with Outkast’s debut single, “Player’s Ball”. “West Coast Bad Boyz: High fo Xmas”, a compilation from Master P’s No Limit label, was released the following year. Death Row, with its mystique built on oxen and gang associations, was different, but a vacation outing probably seemed like a safe bet.

Daz Dillinger, half of the Tha Dogg Pound duo (with Kurupt), claims credit for the idea. “I saw that others were releasing Christmas albums and I thought we should too,” he said in an interview.

Vocalist Daniel Steward, who records as Danny Boy, recalled Death Row general manager Suge Knight’s enthusiasm for the idea, and said the two had discussed it more than once. times “while driving the car”. Knight is currently in prison and has not responded to requests for an interview.

Tha Dogg Pound cut his track at the end of 1995 and set the tone for the album. “I Wish” does not ask for gifts, but reverts to the “I wish I had love” realization over and over again.

“The main thing we wanted at Christmas was love, and that’s what we got from our mothers and that’s what we got from our fathers,” Kurupt said in an interview. In his mind, the song and album presented something precious for a label known for its elaborate stories of drugs and violence: “It shows people that we are human. We have hearts. We have families. This Christmas album gave us the opportunity to show them another side of us.

The idea of ​​having a Christmas song of their creation reach those he loved as a child, like “Happy Holidays to You” by the Whispers and “This Christmas” by Donny Hathaway, filled Kurupt with pride. “These are classic and classic records that we grew up with,” he said. “I looked at him like, ‘We star now. We made a Christmas album, because. ‘”

(Snoop Dogg took an alternate route for “Santa Claus Goes Straight to the Ghetto,” in which he counts some of the 12 days of Christmas and how he will get drunk on each one.)

Recording continued throughout 1996, even after one of the label’s biggest stars, Tupac Shakur, was filmed in Las Vegas in September. Knight booked additional sessions in the Bahamas following Shakur’s death. “Suge wanted to run away,” Danny Boy said.

Kevyn Lewis, the son of jazz pianist Ramsey Lewis and producer on the album, formed a band and traveled to Compass Point Studios to record additional tracks, including Danny Boy singing versions of “The Christmas Song” from Nat King Cole, Hathaway’s “This Christmas” and an original tune, “Peaceful Christmas,” which he wrote with Lewis. The song reflected his mood at the time as he sang, “Sounds like I’m missing joy / Santa doesn’t know me anymore.”

“It really told the story of what we were going through at that point,” Danny Boy said.

Overall, the album presents itself as a hip-hop version of Christmas in Compton – half black humor, half melodrama – punctuated by the traditional songs of the season (“Silver Bells” sung by Michel’le; ” Christmas in the Ghetto ”produced by the OFTB). Its mix of genres structure, and extends beyond rap, provides a glimpse of what Death Row would have been if so much hadn’t changed for the label the year it was released.

Critics often point to the R&B versions of holiday favorites as filler, but these songs reveal a less heard side of Death Row. Suge Knight said he wanted the label to be “90s Motown”, and in 1996, Dr Dre told Vibe that the label diversifies into rock, reggae and jazz. The soundtrack of the 1994 film “Above the Rim” hinted at a different possible future for Death Row. Warren G and Nate Dogg’s “Regulate” was the flagship single, but R&B groups such as SWV, H-Town, Sweet Sable and 2nd II None dominated the album.

“Death Row was very versatile,” John Payne, known as JP, said in an interview. Payne was on Death Row’s founding team in 1991, and he believes the label has become “one-dimensional” by focusing on hip-hop at the expense of other talent he signed. “There was a lot going on that people never realized,” he said. “Look what’s in the safe. There’s gospel, there’s R&B, there’s all kinds of stuff.

In 1996, Shakur’s death wasn’t the only blow that rocked Death Row. Dr. Dre, the rapper and responsible producer of blockbusters like Snoop Dogg’s “Doggystyle” and his own showcase “The Chronic”, left the label in March after clashing with Knight over contracts and personnel issues. In October, Knight went to jail for a probation violation related to an altercation with a rival in Las Vegas.

When “Christmas on Death Row” arrived on December 3rd, the label was in chaos. There were only three weeks left for the album to sell before the holidays, and the label team, mourning Shakur, were unable to promote it.

“We were upset,” Kurupt said. “Everyone was angry and hurt.

With Knight’s incarceration, the label’s chief security officer, Reggie Wright Jr., took over operations, despite his poor business background. While Knight kept a sparse release schedule, Wright released three albums in November 1996 alone: ​​”The Don Killuminati: The 7 Day Theory” by Makaveli (better known as Shakur), “The Doggfather” by Snoop Doggy Dogg and “Death Row Greatest Hits.” When “Christmas on Death Row” came out a week later, he had to compete with the label’s biggest artists for fan money.

Bill Adler, former Def Jam executive and hip-hop author and archivist, said business considerations weren’t the only reason the album failed to connect. “This album was not produced by Dr. Dre, and that makes all the difference,” he said. Without the producer’s signature G-funk, it didn’t feel like Death Row.

Writer Dan Charnas, author of “The Big Payback: The History of the Business of Hip-Hop,” agreed that the loss of Dr. Dre was a devastating setback for the label because of his musical credibility and his sense of the hit. offered a balance. for Chevalier. “He was an entertainment executive who liked to watch hard and play hard,” Charnas said of Knight. “Looking tough and scary was a big part of the mystique of Death Row. This way of doing business tends to implode on itself.

In many ways, the arrival of “Christmas on Death Row” coincided with the start of the label’s final chapters.

“No Suge, no Dr Dre. That’s the key to the game, ”Kurupt said. “Tupac was the icing on the cake. It was all gone.

Death row did not end in 1996; he limped until 2006, when he and Knight filed for bankruptcy. After that, the rights to the label and its catalog went through a number of corporate hands to the MNRK label group, now celebrating Death Row’s 30th anniversary, focusing on digital spaces that did not exist. at the peak of the label.

Death Row’s Instagram account invites visitors to tell the stories of the first time they heard key songs or share the tracks they would use to start themed playlists. He also posts vintage photos of the most charismatic stars of Shakur, Snoop and Death Row. The photos of Knight, which gave Death Row its “unstoppable, invincible evil mystique,” Charnas said. (In 2018, Knight pleaded guilty to manslaughter, hit and run in 2015 after a dispute over the movie “Straight Outta Compton,” and was sentenced to 28 years.)

This is the tension that “Christmas on Death Row” struggled to overcome back then, and it makes the album fascinating now. “This really, really scary outfit applied to this pop culture phenomenon, Christmas music, which is amazing,” Charnas said. “It’s a Christmas miracle! “


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Can something be done to prevent Christmas music from playing in stores? https://alabamabluegrass.org/can-something-be-done-to-prevent-christmas-music-from-playing-in-stores/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 23:52:51 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/can-something-be-done-to-prevent-christmas-music-from-playing-in-stores/ I was recently deflated to find a store playing Christmas music – loudly – the day after Halloween. Can something be done to stop (or at least postpone) this horrible mess? We all know this is just a business trick to make us spend more. -Grognon Long ago, the Christmas season violated the once presumed […]]]>

I was recently deflated to find a store playing Christmas music – loudly – the day after Halloween. Can something be done to stop (or at least postpone) this horrible mess? We all know this is just a business trick to make us spend more. -Grognon

Long ago, the Christmas season violated the once presumed impenetrable Maginot Line of Thanksgiving. Now, as you note, he is gathering his strength on the brink of October. If Halloween falls, nothing will stop Yuletide from walking virtually unhindered during a desperately past Labor Day through July 4 and beyond.

The artistic term for this phenomenon is “Christmas creep”. But is Christmas really scary? The phrase has been in use since at least the 1960s, and I found a complaint about the October Christmas advertisements “rushing the season” in a newspaper since 1901. Is Christmas Creep one of those everlasting reproaches, like the way the old people blasted the terrible music of the young and the disrespect for lawn care since Plato’s time?

Another example: In 2015, a story went viral about Nordstrom’s “one party at a time” policy: no Christmas decorations in their stores until Thanksgiving. The internet rejoiced that, finally, someone would take a long overdue stance against the Christmas creep, but it turned out that in fact, Nordstrom had been doing the same thing every year since at least the 1980s.

If each generation has the same complaint, one explanation is that nothing changes. Perhaps it is just an illusion that the Christmas season is stretching. Maybe there is actually no reason to worry? Maybe Crimea has always been part of Russia, wait, what is it? Why, that’s an October 2021 press release from Nordstrom. In it, they promise Christmas-themed photo booths, an in-store “holiday gift shop” and tours with Santa, all starting October 4.

If every generation has the same complaint, another explanation is that the thing that you complain about is really just more and more shit, every year, forever. By this logic, Justin Bieber is literally the worst thing ever, Plato had to have a lawn to die for, and it is only a matter of time before the Christmas season actually begins before Christmas Eve. year before – and God only knows what kind of ungodly interdimensional time portals that will be unleashed on the world. Good luck.

Questions? Send them to dr.know@wweek.com.


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Latest announcements, merchandise and more https://alabamabluegrass.org/latest-announcements-merchandise-and-more/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 21:18:42 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/latest-announcements-merchandise-and-more/ Before we dive into eggnog (and queso) and let visions of sugar plums dance through our heads for the holidays (and by sugar plums we mean barbecue tacos), wander around the latest announcements. Programming, Holiday Hits Playlist, SXSW Merchandise Sale and Registration Details for SXSW 2022 in Austin, TX and online March 11-20. Newly Announced […]]]>

Before we dive into eggnog (and queso) and let visions of sugar plums dance through our heads for the holidays (and by sugar plums we mean barbecue tacos), wander around the latest announcements. Programming, Holiday Hits Playlist, SXSW Merchandise Sale and Registration Details for SXSW 2022 in Austin, TX and online March 11-20.

Newly Announced

At the heart of SXSW, there is much to discover in the world of tech, film, music and beyond through our 2022 conference and festival lineup list.

From the Conference side, Keynotes Reggie Loved Son, Founder and Managing Partner of Brentwood Growth Partners, and Alexis McGill Johnson, the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the President and CEO of the Planned Parenthood Action Fund have been announced and additional keynote speakers will join them in January. Plus explore our stellar Featured speakers range that so far includes the corporate vice president of the Xbox game creator experience and ecosystem Sarah bond; CEO and co-founder of Patreon Jack Conté; Founder and CEO of Everly Health Julia plays; Oscar nominated and Golden Globe winner Roman coppola; Global Editorial Manager Apple Music Hip-Hop and R&B Ebro Darden; futurist, engineer and designer at Google Emily ma; and master cook Andrew Zimmern, to only cite a few. Dive deeper into hundreds of sessions through our 15 tracks and Vertices with more additions for all current conference formats.

Turn the tape over on the music Festival, we have more than 500 showcasing artists ready to take the stage, including rising R&B singer from London Poppy Ajudha; Hip-hop queen of the south bbymutha; New York rock trio Sunflower Bean; experimental noise poet Moor Mother; Swiss-Tamil R&B singer Priya Ragu; trash punks have become Gucci models Surfbort; Zambian psychedelic rocks from the 1970s WITCH (We intend to wreak havoc); and avant-garde singer and songwriter Eye Circuit. Listen, watch and build your must-see list with our Discover 2022 Showcasing Artists guide.

While the Film festival is set to release its full lineup on January 12, we got a sneak peek with the reveal of the Opening night film 2022 which will be the world premiere of Everything everywhere at once directed by Daniels.

Future: After singing a few sparkling bars by Auld Lang Syne (bonus points if you really know all the words) – the new year kicks off with more SXSW event updates! Stay tuned for big announcements coming in January. including keynotes and guest speakers, film festival lineup, a third set of music festival showcases, mentoring sessions, SXSW Pitch finalists and (you guessed it) more.

Holiday jams

Make yourself comfortable by the fireplace and transform your holiday spirit for up to 11 with the SXSW Holiday Success playlist containing songs from SXSW 2022 featuring Music Fest artists and alumni like Spoon, Black Pumas, Glüme, and more.

Listen

SX Swag

Speaking of comfortable – explore official SXSW Goods for exclusive collections including t-shirts, posters, hoodies, hats, Austin cookbook, Aviator Nation sweatshirts, fanny packs and more.

Give gifts twice as beautiful with our Collaborations for a Cause collection designed by local artists. A portion of the proceeds from this collection supports some Austin charities – find out more here.

To have 25% discount on the whole store when you use the discount code CHEERS at checkout at merch.sxsw.com.

Find your SX Lewk

See you next year

Looking for a holiday gift for a friend, your team, or to treat yourself? The New Year’s resolution to tap into your creative spirit, find collaborators, elevate your career? register today to take advantage of the unique opportunities that the SXSW 2022 Conference and Festivals has to offer, including sessions, music showcases, film screenings, world-class exhibits, a host of networking and professional development opportunities, and the unexpected discoveries that are still part of SXSW from March 11-20, 2022 in Austin, TX and online.

All SXSW Badges access SXSW Online, our digital event component that includes content streamed live from conference sessions to iconic film and music festivals, as well as unique networking opportunities and more. And if you can’t do it in IRL, check out our Online pass.

Register early to save by next price increase on January 13, 2022. Registrants also have access to the lowest hotel rates in Austin during the March event when booking through Accommodation and Travel SXSW.

The whole SXSW family wishes you a safe, relaxing, cookie-filled happy holiday season. We’ll see you back in 2022 with more exciting lineup announcements!

Register now

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