Music industry – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ Fri, 10 Sep 2021 11:56:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://alabamabluegrass.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music industry – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ 32 32 How returning to my father’s hometown brought back my love for live music https://alabamabluegrass.org/how-returning-to-my-fathers-hometown-brought-back-my-love-for-live-music/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/how-returning-to-my-fathers-hometown-brought-back-my-love-for-live-music/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/how-returning-to-my-fathers-hometown-brought-back-my-love-for-live-music/ This first-person article is the experience of Caitlin Stall-Paquet, a Montreal writer. For more information on CBC’s first-person stories, please visit the FAQ. Descending through the clouds on a small plane filled with people from the media and the music industry, I see the vast conifer-dominated boreal forest surrounded by felled swaths. We traveled 630 […]]]>

This first-person article is the experience of Caitlin Stall-Paquet, a Montreal writer. For more information on CBC’s first-person stories, please visit the FAQ.

Descending through the clouds on a small plane filled with people from the media and the music industry, I see the vast conifer-dominated boreal forest surrounded by felled swaths. We traveled 630 kilometers northwest of Montreal to Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec, the national brass capital, for the Emerging Music Festival (EMF).

Although this is my first time attending the festival, it is not my first time in the region otherwise known for its mining and forestry industries. This is where my father grew up, where he took my brothers and I 25 years ago to show us the lakes and woods of his childhood and it is a landscape I have wanted to return to since his death. in 2017. This Labor Day weekend – a relatively quiet time in the pandemic storm – is a time for a late comeback as we collectively try to redefine normal.

From the moment we step into the shuttle, it’s clear that FME is rooted in the community, as the volunteer drivers regale us with stories of past editions. Co-founder Jenny Thibault points out that the non-profit festival would not be possible without these volunteers. The community effort in the eclectic and inclusive event dates back to its pre-Spotify origins, when the founders wanted to bring indie music home rather than always having to travel to the big cities. It has changed the culture here since my family called it home.

Thibault says part of the festival’s legacy in the region is turning more people into engaged music lovers, who now sometimes suggest new artists to organizers. Although it has become the city’s biggest weekend of the year, FME’s modest primary goal is to build memorable lineups while remaining profitable.

After a very pared-down edition last year, the 19th edition of the WWF still had signs of the ongoing pandemic – like green bracelets indicating that your vaccination status had been confirmed. (Thomas Dufresne / Emerging Music Festival)

After a very sober festival in 2020, this 19th edition is a step towards a return to normalcy, with limited reception capacities and the new Quebec vaccination passport made visible in the form of green plastic bracelets. Some differences caused by COVID may turn into more lasting changes, such as the inclusion of more English-speaking groups from outside the province, as travel for European artists is currently not possible. This overcoming linguistic divides is something Thibault has been trying to do for years, and it reminds me of my French-speaking father from this predominantly French-speaking region, who told me that he considered himself bilingual.

One of the opening night programs, at the Poisson Volant outdoor stage on a shore of Lake Osisko, is full of linguistic diversity. There, Toronto’s Pantayo quintet, from the Filipino diaspora, performs a set combining traditional gongs and kulintang drums with groove synth lines and addresses the crowd in Tagalog. There is excitement in the air for this expected return to the stage for many artists, and our own return to the crowd.

When the Canadian-Congolese musician Pierre Kwenders comes out, opening with the song “Rendez-vous” from his 2017 Makanda at the end of space, at the beginning of time, he tells us how happy he is to see us again after so many months, “it’s a date“- it’s a date, he says. People are there to meet too, dancing to his sexy tunes which deliver his singular indie-afro electro with lyrics in Lingala, French, English, Tshiluba and Kikongo.

My father would have marveled at these sounds echoing in his hometown built around the copper mine that was active until his teenage years. I imagine him next to me, discreetly doing his characteristic awkward mix (like a real Quebecois dad, he was more used to Jethro Tull – he even played the transverse flute), alongside visitors and young people. local parents with breast-sleeping babies, all dancing.

Ducks Ltd. performs at the Last Chance Cabaret as part of the FME. (Submitted by Caitlin Stall-Paquet)

The shift in Canadian programming also brought my friend Tom McGreevy from Toronto on stage at the Last Chance Cabaret, which has been hosting shows since the early 1980s, along with his band mates from Ducks Ltd. When a barefoot Tom proclaims his joy to be in a province it is so beautiful“after a hiatus from the scene since 2019, the count of months turned into years is adding up in my head. They quickly enter the title track of their EP” Get Bleak “which strikes a clever balance between desperate-centric lyrics and sunny jangle-pop melodies – a timely combination that I danced to alone in my kitchen during confinement.

The main area occupied by FME in Rouyn-Noranda is compact – a 20 minute walk will get you almost anywhere in what looks like a sonic playground. Surprise shows are played everywhere, from DJ Gayance spinning in the parking lot of the institution of poutine Morasse (the site of the festival’s first spontaneous show by Frannie Holder of Random Recipe) to the backxwash artist, Polaris winner, who meets hardcore and hip-hop. a garage with its door wide open. This pop-up format binds locals to FME, highlighting how the festival and venue are one.

Backxwash performed from inside a garage with its door wide open. (Thomas Dufresne / Emerging Music Festival)

Thibault tells me that these spaces are often offered free of charge, recalling a story of helping his neighbor in the often inhospitable environment of Abitibi.

On a gray afternoon, I walk east past FME’s central hub to a personal landmark, the airy notes of a wandering middle-aged flautist fading as I go. As I turn onto verdant Chadbourne Avenue, I remember memories working in mysterious ways, sleeping in the hippocampus until the stimulus returns to rekindle them. I had forgotten that the tin roof of the house my father had grown up in was orange until I saw it. Standing in front of the modest house, I imagine the eight members of my family living here, half of whom are now gone. I imagine my aunts, uncle and father running along this sidewalk I stood on 22 years ago as now, throats tight, all ghosts in a time loop.

The memory of the orange roof echoed the night before, after walking up Eighth Avenue through an alley punctuated by the piles of the Horne copper smelter, like a smoking umlaut. The pulsating beat of psychedelic Montreal post-rockers Yoo Doo Right bewitched a small crowd at a sidewalk pop-up show that got louder until I got into it. The stimulus returned; I realized how much I missed being in the exploding radius of an amplified guitar and bass, flooded with sound. I had forgotten that feeling until I felt the waves reverberate off the water in my guts.


CBC Quebec welcomes your presentations for the first person trials. Please email povquebec@cbc.ca for more details.

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Arsena Schroeder uses her “Unplugged + Live” concert series to feature local musicians https://alabamabluegrass.org/arsena-schroeder-uses-her-unplugged-live-concert-series-to-feature-local-musicians/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/arsena-schroeder-uses-her-unplugged-live-concert-series-to-feature-local-musicians/#respond Thu, 09 Sep 2021 10:04:03 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/arsena-schroeder-uses-her-unplugged-live-concert-series-to-feature-local-musicians/ Arsena Schroeder has had her share of accomplishments as a freelance singer-songwriter for nearly a decade. The pop-soul artist has performed nationally and internationally while making a name for himself in the music industry. With her platform, she now wants to help and showcase other artists who are not signed by the majors. “I realized […]]]>

Arsena Schroeder has had her share of accomplishments as a freelance singer-songwriter for nearly a decade.

The pop-soul artist has performed nationally and internationally while making a name for himself in the music industry. With her platform, she now wants to help and showcase other artists who are not signed by the majors.

“I realized when I started music on my own I just needed a lot of resources,” the Charlotte native said in a recent phone interview. “Once I established myself, I formed a company that provides these resources.”

On Saturday, Schroeder and his team from Dear Soul Music Co., a Charlotte-based music label she founded in 2017, will host “Unplugged + Live”, a touring concert series that showcases the talent of artists. local independents. The event is sponsored by ASC Culture Blocks, a community partnership funded by Mecklenburg County.

Located on the lawn of the Eastway Regional Recreation Center, the Luncheon Edition concert will feature a live DJ, food trucks and special performances by artists from Charlotte AftanCi and Monalisa Music.

The Unplugged + Live series, founded in 2013, was initially a house concert.

Back then, whenever Schroeder traveled to perform, she would put on shows with friends and colleagues where she could entertain a small crowd and have a place to stay.

“It was a great way to compliment my public show with a more private show,” she said.

Seeing the success of these shows, she decided to start a series in Charlotte that would feature local artists.

As the popularity of these house concerts increased, Schroeder would move the shows to larger venues.

Since its inception, the series has featured more than 150 artists in cities like Atlanta and Los Angeles.

Each show features two or three hand-selected acts, giving them the opportunity to present their original work to a local audience.

Schroeder said she has worked with more than 100 Charlotte-based artists and put on nearly 200 shows across town.

Monalisa Music, one of Saturday’s featured artists, said she was excited to share her original music with the Charlotte community.

“The community really loved and supported me to get to know myself through my sarcastic love songs,” she said.

The neo-soul singer and musician said she has watched Schroeder and his series from afar and can’t wait to finally be a part of it.

“I was super excited to be included in what appears to be a very exclusive and elite musician’s club,” she said. this number.

An unexpected turn

While Schroeder was admired by many in the music industry, she hadn’t always planned to be a full-time singer-songwriter.

During her freshman year at Pfeiffer University, a friend asked Schroeder to write and sing a song for his mixtape. At first hesitant, she decided to do it.

“… I saw it as a stretch because I didn’t consider myself a singer,” she recalls. “I fell in love with this process, and that’s what kind of pushed me to become a songwriter and want to explore more.”

After obtaining degrees in mass communication and sociology in 2011, Schroeder decided to pursue a career in music and give up his original plan to pursue higher education.

In 2012, she released her first EP, titled “Abundantly”. It consisted of four songs that she wrote in college.

Since, Schroeder has released four EPs, two albums and has performed in national and international theaters. These venues include La Loca Music in Prague, Czech Republic; the Fleisher Art Memorial in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Rockwood Music Hall in New York.

Two of her most memorable venues, both in Charlotte, are the Neighborhood Theater and the Time Warner Arena, now known as the Spectrum Center, where she received a standing ovation, she said, from the owner of the Charlotte Hornets, Michael Jordan.

Schroeder said that while she enjoys performing in large venues, home shows provide an “authentic and organic” experience, which she hopes for her performers and guests at Unplugged + Live.

One of its goals, she said, is to provide local artists with a safe space to share their music in their own way, without fear of competition and high expectations.

“We try to get artists to do things at their own pace, and how they like to do it whether it’s popular or not,” she said.

A label to her

In 2017, Schroeder created Dear Soul Music Co. not only to manage its concert series, but also to help develop emerging artists.

His label offers workshops, called “Using Your Unique”, to provide training in areas such as songwriting, music production and branding.

Schroeder has received several awards and funding for his concert series and workshops.

She said she was happy with the recent success of her brand and that she hopes the local exposure will give artists a larger “home” fan base as they move up in the industry.

“It’s important that when people listen to your content, they bond with it,” she said. “With this event, as artists, we can get loyal fans because they see us in an environment that supports us.”

Unplugged + Live will take place from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. Although the event is free to the public, tickets can be downloaded from Eventbrite.

In accordance with pandemic protocols, visitors are encouraged to practice social distancing and wear face coverings, as required by Charlotte’s masking warrant.

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Column: Three chords and the truth https://alabamabluegrass.org/column-three-chords-and-the-truth/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/column-three-chords-and-the-truth/#respond Thu, 09 Sep 2021 00:31:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/column-three-chords-and-the-truth/ The bend of a guitar string, the soft drop of a violin bow and the nasal vibrato of a local voice: country music is the language of rural America. Once the anthem of the working class, it has become the calling card of conservative America. The genre emerged from the Appalachians on the tail of […]]]>

The bend of a guitar string, the soft drop of a violin bow and the nasal vibrato of a local voice: country music is the language of rural America. Once the anthem of the working class, it has become the calling card of conservative America.

The genre emerged from the Appalachians on the tail of bluegrass and folk music. At the end of the 19th century, when immigrants from all over the world found homes in the United States, they brought with them their own unique folk traditions. In the South, these musical styles mixed with white, black and indigenous rural traditions to create the models for what we know today as country music.

Songwriter Harlan Howard once infamously defined country music as “three chords and the truth.” A simplistic musical style which, between the melodies, is loaded with candor. Cape Cod-born, Nashville-based country artist Morgan Johnston can attest to this.

“Country music has a special way of connecting with the interior of people’s lives. [and] the way they tell stories, ”she said in an interview with The Daily Tar Heel.

Despite the roots of country music, time has given the genre new meaning. Cold War folk artists, many of whom sang from the perspective of the working class, have been accused of sedition at a time when the proletarian revolution and the red fear dictated foreign policy. These folk singers were renamed “country” to avoid persecution. In the 1990s, there were more country music radio stations than any other genre.

But no historical event has had such a lasting impact on gender as the terrorist attacks of September 11. As the political landscape of the country has undergone unprecedented changes, country music has become a place of manifestation of these changes.

A country shaken by extremism and the threat of foreign attacks, has rallied to its fundamental principles, as any suspicion of disloyalty has had social and legal consequences.

The post 9/11 political climate discouraged dissent of all kinds, even at the risk of silencing valid criticism of the United States and its wartime efforts against Iraq. September 11 rationalized country music as a vehicle for patriotism, but it also punished protests at the same time.

Natalie Maines, lead singer of the Chicks, the country girl group then known as Dixie Chicks, said in an interview with the Los Angeles Daily News in 2002 that Toby Keith’s song, “Courtesy Of the Red, White & Blue, ”was dangerous and under-informed.

“I hate it. It’s ignorant and it makes country music seem ignorant,” she said in the interview. “It targets a whole culture… and not just bad people who have done bad things. You have to be tactful.”

Keith retaliated by posting a falsified image of Maines snuggling up to Saddam Hussein, the then Iraqi president, on the jumbotron of his tour. Keith’s reaction illustrated the perceived link between dissent and betrayal that arose in post-9/11 America.

The chicks sadly began to don “FUTK” shirts, jokingly representing “friends united in kindness” or “freedom, understanding, truth and knowledge”. However, Maines later admitted that the acronym stood for “F — you Toby Keith”.

At a concert in London in 2003, Maines said she was “ashamed that the President of the United States [was] from Texas. His opposition to President Bush’s handling of the Iraq war virtually ended the Chicks’ career. In a nutshell, the Chicks have fallen out of favor – certified diamond albums to the blacklist of country radio.

The Chicks became the first example of Internet “cancellation”, with both their reputation and their careers in jeopardy. A wave of conservatism that had embraced the country after 2001 seeped into the industry itself and created new rules as to who could be a star in the country.

These rules punished vocal progressive women like the Chicks. Women would not reemerge in the traditional country until the early 2010s, with artists like Kacey Musgraves and Brandi Carlile.

Morgan Johnston says she has felt supported by men and other women in the industry who recognize the longstanding obstacles women have faced in order to be successful in modern country music. Over the past five years, Johnston says she has seen a resurgence of advocacy for women in the industry.

However, the growing presence of women in the country has not meant less variety in the political affiliations of gender performers.

George Floyd’s murder sparked a series of gradual name changes, including the Chicks – erasing their ties to “Dixie” – and Lady A – erasing their ties to pre-Civil War America, regardless of the scandal that would arise later with the pre-civil war. -the existing black singer Lady A.

Several country and public musicians, but not all, still have racist and sexist prejudices. Following the Morgan Wallen scandal in February, in which he was filmed drunk speaking racial slurs, Wallen has become more popular than before. Instead of suffering retaliation, his new album skyrocketed the charts and arguably performed better than initially expected.

Compare Wallen’s treatment, following a political controversy, to that of the Chicks almost two decades earlier.

Ian McConnell, another Nashville artist whose style leans towards pop and rock, notes how the country music industry is not ripe for change. The genre, explains McConnell, has a very focused demographics.

Over the past two decades, this demographic has been increasingly conservative America. Music and artists have bowed to the wishes of this audience, even if it means excluding people of color and women of the historically diverse genre.

“I think there is a wonderful talk about race in music and misogyny in the industry,” McConnell said. “I think the more we talk about it, the more the target audience will change.”

Women have once again found a prominent voice in the genre, but black country artists like Darius Rucker are still criticized for openly supporting the Black Lives Matter movement.

Like many in the industry today, we hope that country music will return to its diverse roots, serving not only a conservative white middle class, but also the diverse ethnic and racial traditions of the American working class.

In the meantime, the genre that has turned to pop, rock and blues now leans too often to the right.

@dthopinion

opinion@dailytarheel.com

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Mayk Raises $ 4 Million to Help Fans Become Music Creators https://alabamabluegrass.org/mayk-raises-4-million-to-help-fans-become-music-creators/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/mayk-raises-4-million-to-help-fans-become-music-creators/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 14:14:04 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/mayk-raises-4-million-to-help-fans-become-music-creators/ Mayk.it raised $ 4 million to join the Startup Parade on the premise that fans want to be music makers too. Co-founders Stefan Heinrich Henriquez, former head of global marketing at TikTok and chief marketing officer at Cameo, and Akiva Bamberger, former software engineer at Snap’s Spectacles, announced a $ 4 million funding round. Investors […]]]>

Mayk.it raised $ 4 million to join the Startup Parade on the premise that fans want to be music makers too.

Co-founders Stefan Heinrich Henriquez, former head of global marketing at TikTok and chief marketing officer at Cameo, and Akiva Bamberger, former software engineer at Snap’s Spectacles, announced a $ 4 million funding round.

Investors include Greycroft, Chicago Ventures, Slow Ventures, firstminute, Steven Galanis, Randi Zuckerberg, YouTuber Mr. Beasts’ Night media, Spotify first CMO Sophia Bendz, Cyan Banister, T-Pain and music industry veterinarian Zach Katz.

Mayk.it hopes to be the Canva for composing and sharing music.

Here is the pitch:

Create original songs for streaming or social media.

Collaborate with our team of professional producers to create fully personalized songs on our virtual studio!

Still in beta, May it has yet to release user statistics.

“I’ve been thinking about music since being at TikTok, and I was really thinking about building something on my own, but it took me another year to finally have the courage to do it,” Henriquez told TechCrunch . “Then when the pandemic started I think so many people were thinking like, ‘What am I doing with my life? “”

Bruce houghton is Founder and Publisher of Hypebot and MusicThinkTank and is Senior Advisor to Bandsintown which acquired both publications in 2019. He is Founder and Chairman of the Skyline Artists Agency and Professor at Berklee College Of Music.

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Sonnet & Jubël highlight K-Pop collaborations extending to new genres and territories https://alabamabluegrass.org/sonnet-jubel-highlight-k-pop-collaborations-extending-to-new-genres-and-territories/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/sonnet-jubel-highlight-k-pop-collaborations-extending-to-new-genres-and-territories/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 23:45:34 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/sonnet-jubel-highlight-k-pop-collaborations-extending-to-new-genres-and-territories/ Sonnet Warner Music Korea As Jubel has topped the charts in his native Sweden and across Europe, the dance-pop duo are expanding even further by enlisting one of Korea’s most promising singers, Sonnet, in a truly global collaboration. The transformation of their new single “Dumb” into an Anglo-Korean duo is just the latest example of […]]]>

As Jubel has topped the charts in his native Sweden and across Europe, the dance-pop duo are expanding even further by enlisting one of Korea’s most promising singers, Sonnet, in a truly global collaboration. The transformation of their new single “Dumb” into an Anglo-Korean duo is just the latest example of how the world of K-pop is making important crossovers beyond the traditional world of mainstream pop.

From the first listen, the single “Dumb” seemed poised for a revolutionary success similar to that of Jubël’s first hit “Dancing in the Moonlight” which featured the Swedish singer-songwriter NEIMY to a club trance tune. pop well-being. By collaborating again with a singer for this new version “Dumb”, this time with Sonnet, the singer-songwriter who first rose to prominence in her country by being the youngest winner of Korea voice—The duo deliver something all the more engaging and accessible to listeners who can appreciate both the male and female vocal tone and the lyrical perspective. Sonnet’s light vibrato fits perfectly into the summer production of “Dumb” while contrasting nicely with the raucous performance of singer Sebastian Atas.

MORE FORBESENHYPEN Reflects on Global Success, Future Goals, and “Creating Music Everyone Can Identify With”

While K-pop has led South Korea to become one of the largest music industries in the world (currently sixth behind the United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany and France, according to the the latest world music report of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry), the international expansion of the scene can not only be counted among the best mainstream pop groups, but also the continuation of the greater efforts of music, Korean singers and creatives getting noticed around the world. Bringing in a musically cohesive project like “Dumb” with Jubel and Sonnet can specifically help listeners in the dance, electronics, and club worlds get even more accustomed to hearing songs in Korean and English. which means that it is not necessarily necessary to take the bulk of the world. pop stars collaborate to deliver effective and meaningful collaborations. Rather, Jubel and Sonnet’s “Dumb” has the potential to take the two artists beyond their fan base, broaden their reach, but also create a greater impact on what international collaborations look like in the world. music industry today.

Going further with “Dumb” with a solo version of Sonnet as well as joint interviews with the two artists show that this collaboration is not just a pirated track, but a track with time and effort invested on both sides. Although there is a lot of talk about a global music industry these days, Sonnet and Jubël are ensuring that their respective stages and countries develop in a healthy way.

Watch the duet version of “Dumb” with Jubël and Sonnet below and look for the

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EVOS Esports announces collaboration with Universal Music Malaysia https://alabamabluegrass.org/evos-esports-announces-collaboration-with-universal-music-malaysia/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/evos-esports-announces-collaboration-with-universal-music-malaysia/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 10:59:19 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/evos-esports-announces-collaboration-with-universal-music-malaysia/ Southeast Asian Organization EVOS Esports announced a collaboration with the music label Universal Music Malaysia to organize a PUBG MOBILE community event. According to the statement, the collaboration will involve VIP players from EVOS and brand ambassadors, as well as artists from Universal Music Malaysia. Image credit: EVOS Esports, Universal Music Malaysia RELATED: Bank Mandiri […]]]>

Southeast Asian Organization EVOS Esports announced a collaboration with the music label Universal Music Malaysia to organize a PUBG MOBILE community event.

According to the statement, the collaboration will involve VIP players from EVOS and brand ambassadors, as well as artists from Universal Music Malaysia.

Image credit: EVOS Esports, Universal Music Malaysia

RELATED: Bank Mandiri Launches EVOS Esports Debit Card

OMEN by HP, Chek Hup, Domino’s and Matchroom have all been confirmed as partners for the event, which will be broadcast live on August 13.

Some of the talents involved in the event include Muhammad ‘Yakuza’ Afiq and Muhammad ‘xSamZ’ Abdul Samad, more Universal Music DOLLA Syasya, Shalma, and Meer Nash.

Fans who watch the live stream will also have the opportunity to play with the talents involved. EVOS has stated that custom rules will be implemented during these matches.

Matthew Chan, Business Development Manager for EVOS Esports Strategy, told Esports Insider that the two entities have planned for the collaboration throughout 2021.

He said, “We started connecting with Universal Music Group earlier this year, we shared our plans and they immediately got involved. It took us a few months to finalize the details and everything was postponed a bit due to the pandemic.

“However, they were very supportive and kept the talks going despite all the delays. Fortunately, after a little more back and forth, we were able to finalize the collaboration with them and start our schedule. “

RELATED: EVOS and Nexplay Join Forces to Create the MPL PH Team

The music industry and the esports sector have become even more closely linked over the past 12 months, with a variety of music labels partnering with esports entities.

This year alone, the Warner Music brands made deals with MAD Lions, ESPL and LCO. Additionally, ReKTGlobal recently announced a collaboration with the Breakaway Music Festival. According to Chan, this trend is expected to continue.

“Music and esports have always had a lot of similarities,” he explained. “The same audience, the same interest. This isn’t the first time this has happened and we’re sure it won’t be the last time either. We hope to take this collaboration even further. “

Esports Insider says: It’s very interesting to see how music is integrated into the esports industry. The collaboration of EVOS and Universal Music Malaysia is another example of how the two sectors can intertwine. The deal is expected to increase the popularity of all participating players / artists. In addition, securing a range of business partners for the event should also benefit both entities.

Follow ESI on Instagram

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The Female Songwriters Hall of Fame Presents https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-female-songwriters-hall-of-fame-presents/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-female-songwriters-hall-of-fame-presents/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-female-songwriters-hall-of-fame-presents/ Panels, workshops; Special programs from music label artists. Observations of special artists, mix of DJ performances; And a special broadcast of the inaugural 2021 Female Songwriters Hall of Fame Awards; More to be announced soon! WASHINGTON, August 10, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Female Songwriters Hall of Fame on December 18, 2021 welcomes its first […]]]>

Panels, workshops; Special programs from music label artists. Observations of special artists, mix of DJ performances; And a special broadcast of the inaugural 2021 Female Songwriters Hall of Fame Awards; More to be announced soon!

WASHINGTON, August 10, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Female Songwriters Hall of Fame on December 18, 2021 welcomes its first WSHOF -Winter Social Mixer

WE DID IT! IT WAS AMAZING – SO YOU MISSED IT! THERE IS ALWAYS NEXT YEAR! INAUGURAL EVENT AT THE TEMPLE OF FAME FOR WOMEN AUTHOR-COMPOSERS ON JUNE 25, 2021

Congratulations!! To the Female Songwriters Hall of Fame for an epic event that took place on Friday 25 June 2021 @ the National Museum of Women’s Arts in Washington DC . It was hosted by Dynamic and Amazing Singer / Songwriter and The Original Fashionista – Ms. Jody watley.

We have also honored iconic and legendary women and names in the music industry such as:

The incomparable Valerie Simpson who was a Total Class Act !! – and gave us confidence in being “Every woman and why she is rock solid”.

Irene Gandy we love you and we keep you. “You are a beautiful soul”

Naomi judd which recounts how music has helped her survive some trauma, heal, and connect with her daughters you know as (Wynona and Ashley Judd. This in itself is a testament to will – one singer girl and the other actress).

Dawn Lewis – who started the support to help the WSHOF mission by giving (3) $ 2,000 scholarships for young girls studying music.

Congratulations, again to -The Go-Go’s, Cheryl cooley of Klymaxx, the sweet heart Mrs. Jekalyn Carr, the inspiring Mrs. Rabbit shell and Dynamic Dr. Veryl Howard.

Amazing performances of Harpist – Marie Antoinette left you breathless and Soul Stirring performances in Renée Crutchfield Patterson, Jokia and Leah Oduro-Kwarten left us at Awwwe! The Sweet Cherie group rocked …

In a few months, you’ll have the opportunity to meet rising songwriters and singers at another new release for the Female Songwriters Hall of Fame – Our First Winter Social Mixer WSHOF.

We will share with you a first look at the panels, speakers, lively discussions, Q&A and events. This will take place in Washington, DC. to our mixer on December 18, 2021. The location of the workshops and one-day performances will be announced shortly.

The program will be face-to-face and virtual and will focus more on the aspiring songwriter, singer and performer. Although most of the entrants to date are quite young, we strongly encourage songwriters and singers between the ages of 18 and 75 to submit and participate. Since this is a fundraiser and a contest. Admission is chargeable. The fees will be used to help the expenses of the winner of the songwriting competition.

A WSHOF – Honoree or member will deliver a special message, you will see footage and video shorts from the Inaugural WSHOF Awards 2021, and there will also be a Jam session by songwriters and performers during the event.

The success and impact of the Inaugural Women Songwriters Hall of Fame has inspired other events and industry leaders to recognize women in the music industry such as: The Grammy’s, Rock N Roll Hall of Fame, Songwriters Hall of Fame and even Oprah winfrey and its Legends Ball 2021 with nods to Diana ross, Tina turner, Roberta flack who was also honored for the Women Songwriters Hall of Fame and others.

The success and impact of the Womens Songwriters Hall Fame has helped other organizations recognize and understand the importance of work.

This is the hope of the Women Songwriters Hall of Fame and those who will partner and connect with us to move forward and help open doors for women in a myriad of roles such as: CEO, Editing, musicians, songwriters and many other fields, says founder / executive director Janice McLean DeLoatch.

After 60 years in the music business, women practically left speechless. It’s time to take new steps, open doors, uplift the women of the past, and forge new frontiers for the women of today.

As such, the Women Songwriters Hall of Fame seeks partnerships, collaborations and opportunities to help advance this work and welcomes your request.

Registration is now open to register if you are interested in competing as a songwriter for our Winter Social Mixer

Then head to the Women Songwriters Hall of Fame (www.womensongwritershalloffame.org) to reserve your spot and receive updates on new events added to the lineup. We look forward to celebrating with you in December 2021.

To learn more about the Female Songwriters Hall of Fame, visit www.womensongwritershalloffame.org and follow Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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SOURCE Singer-Songwriter Hall of Fame

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A-level music education in schools could “disappear” in just over a decade https://alabamabluegrass.org/a-level-music-education-in-schools-could-disappear-in-just-over-a-decade/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/a-level-music-education-in-schools-could-disappear-in-just-over-a-decade/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 07:30:47 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/a-level-music-education-in-schools-could-disappear-in-just-over-a-decade/ A-level music education in schools could disappear altogether in just over a decade, new research shows. According to researchers at Birmingham City University, the decline in access to musical qualifications has been accelerated by cuts in funding to local and central governments. They are now warning that qualifying could be wiped out entirely by 2033, […]]]>

A-level music education in schools could disappear altogether in just over a decade, new research shows.

According to researchers at Birmingham City University, the decline in access to musical qualifications has been accelerated by cuts in funding to local and central governments.

They are now warning that qualifying could be wiped out entirely by 2033, cutting off an entire pipeline of future talent from the UK.

The findings from lead researchers Dr Adam Whittaker and Professor Martin Fautley have now led music academics and music industry professionals to call for urgent intervention and a package of political and financial measures to support the UK state music education system.

Dr Whittaker said: “We know from the trends in A-level adoption over the past few years that the number of students taking A-level music has fallen to a level of great concern.

“We are now in a position where there are parts of the country with very limited access to A-level music or, in some cases, no access at all.

“Children cannot choose a diploma that is not offered to them. What should a child who wishes to take a level A music lesson do if the nearest school offering it is 50 km away? We need A-level music and other specialized subjects to be offered in a range of schools across a local authority area.

“This is important because A-level music can help young musicians pursue higher education in music and their future careers, including as the next generation of music educators. “

In their research, which is available here, Dr Whittaker and Professor Fautley state that “Those who cannot afford to fund private instrumental studies are unlikely to have sufficient income to pay for independent tuition, even if a scholarship supports them at a higher or lower level. to a lesser extent… current rates of decline in admissions in recent years show that A-level music is likely to have zero admissions by 2033 if the current rate of decline continues in a linear fashion.

In the report, it was also revealed that independent schools account for a disproportionate number of A-level music admissions compared to national entry statistics, which could lead to a talent sinkhole.

Their research also confirmed that the proportion of students taking music training in the Midlands has fallen to just 1% following a drop in the number of schools and colleges offering the optional course – in line with national adoption.

Calling on the government for change, UK Music Director-General Jamie Njoku-Goodwin said: “There has been a worrying decline in the number of young people studying music at A level in recent years.

“Unless action is taken to reverse this trend, there is a real risk of serious damage to the talent pool on which the music industry relies.

“Music education enriches the lives of countless children and young people, but it also brings enormous cultural, economic and social benefits to the UK.

“At UK Music we continue to discuss with government and education officials how we can ensure that children of all backgrounds have the best possible chance to study music, which is one of the our great national assets. “

Professor Martin Fautley added, “We have been concerned about the decline in the number of A-level music for some time. Music is an important part of the lives of many of our young people, but fewer and fewer of them are choosing higher education while in school.

“With the increasing fragmentation of the education system that this government has overseen, there is a very real possibility that many of our young people will simply not have the opportunity to participate in this study, even if they want to. “

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Morgan Wallen Label Big Loud Announces New Rock / Alternative Footprint https://alabamabluegrass.org/morgan-wallen-label-big-loud-announces-new-rock-alternative-footprint/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/morgan-wallen-label-big-loud-announces-new-rock-alternative-footprint/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 20:38:53 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/morgan-wallen-label-big-loud-announces-new-rock-alternative-footprint/ Photo credit: Big Loud Records Big Loud Records is launching a new rock / alternative imprint called Big Loud Rock. Big Loud Records is the label for many country bands, including Morgan Wallen, Chris Lane, Hardy and Jake Owen. Now, the new Big Loud Rock label will hire AJ Kasen as senior vice president of […]]]>

Photo credit: Big Loud Records

Big Loud Records is launching a new rock / alternative imprint called Big Loud Rock.

Big Loud Records is the label for many country bands, including Morgan Wallen, Chris Lane, Hardy and Jake Owen. Now, the new Big Loud Rock label will hire AJ Kasen as senior vice president of A&R.

Kasen began his career in the music industry with Lava Records in 2011. In 2015 he joined Better Noise Music as the label’s A&R director, before becoming vice president in 2017. Kasen will join Greg Thompson and Lloyd Aur Norman within the label. .

“We are honored to have AJ join the Big Loud family,” said Thompson, president of Big Loud Rock. “It’s exciting to have someone with his pedigree to continue and develop our commitment to the rock world. Teaming him up with Lloyd will give us the best leadership we can imagine. “

Big Loud Rock signed their first act, Blame My Youth earlier this year. The group is led by former Empire member Sean Van Vleet. The group will release their debut EP this fall as their current single, “Fantastic” climbs the charts.

Big Loud Records also announced several advancements and new hires in recent weeks. Stacy Blythe moved to SVP Promotion from her previous role as VP Promotion. Ali Matkosky takes on Blythe’s former role as vice president of promotion after being replaced by national director of promotion. Tyler Waugh will take on this post after serving as Southeast Promotion Manager.

Sarah Headley will take on the role of South East Promotion Director following her previous role as Promotion Coordinator. Delaney Rogers will transfer her role as Executive Assistant from Big Loud Partner / CEO Seth England to Stacy Blythe.

Kelley Brock also joined the label as promotion coordinator. Previously, she was a radio personality at WKDF Nashville and WUSY Chattanooga. Aubrey Wilson joins Big Loud Records as Data and Analytics Coordinator to replace Giuliana Mignone, who left the label to pursue her career as an artist.

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LCCM Opens for Music Industry Insiders Day – India Education | Latest Education News | Global education news https://alabamabluegrass.org/lccm-opens-for-music-industry-insiders-day-india-education-latest-education-news-global-education-news/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/lccm-opens-for-music-industry-insiders-day-india-education-latest-education-news-global-education-news/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 12:14:57 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/lccm-opens-for-music-industry-insiders-day-india-education-latest-education-news-global-education-news/ London: On August 14, 2021, the London College of Creative Media opens its doors to anyone considering a career in the industry. The ‘Music Industry Insiders Day’ event will be held at LCCM’s iconic Music Box campus, where prospective students can attend one of the college’s ‘Box Talks’ events with DJ Semtex – DJ, presenter, […]]]>

London: On August 14, 2021, the London College of Creative Media opens its doors to anyone considering a career in the industry.

The ‘Music Industry Insiders Day’ event will be held at LCCM’s iconic Music Box campus, where prospective students can attend one of the college’s ‘Box Talks’ events with DJ Semtex – DJ, presenter, A&R and l ‘host of’ Hip Hop Raised Me ‘Podcast.

Those considering a career in the music industry will have the opportunity to participate in industry-relevant masterclasses, introductory workshops in performance, songwriting, music production and the music business, as well as receiving advice from key business organizations including Ivors Academy, Incorporated Society of Musicians and the Music Publishers Association.

“Our Music Industry Insider Day is perfect for passionate musicians and entrepreneurs of tomorrow who want to make their mark in the music industry, whether as a performer, songwriter, producer, framework or whatever in between, ”says JD Donovan, Industry at LCCM. Connection. “Not only will the day be educational with workshops and tours of our state-of-the-art studios, but also fun as we welcome people back to the music box after 18 months!”

Attendees will meet top LCCM staff and tutors, as well as current students and alumni, and watch the joint event of first-year music business management and music performance students, “LCCM Worldvision,” which celebrates college artists around the world.

Registration and visits will begin at noon with a welcome speech followed by a student show at 12:30 pm. At 1 p.m., prospective students can participate in a songwriting workshop or an introductory music business management session before a performance workshop at 2 p.m. The ‘LCCM Worldvision’ performances (level 4 student project) or the free music production session will take place at 3 p.m., followed by the production workshop at 4 p.m. and Box Talk with DJ Semtex at 5 p.m.

Throughout the day, where COVID-19 guidelines will be in place, admissions counselors and current students will be on hand to answer questions and there will be all-day access to industry partner booths. musical from the LCCM. Additionally, there will be an open door policy in some Music Box rooms and free soft drinks and snacks at Venue Bar.

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