Music industry – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 01:50:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://alabamabluegrass.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music industry – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ 32 32 Litmus Music Announces Music Rights Industry Veteran Monti Olson as Chairman https://alabamabluegrass.org/litmus-music-announces-music-rights-industry-veteran-monti-olson-as-chairman/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 01:50:42 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/litmus-music-announces-music-rights-industry-veteran-monti-olson-as-chairman/ On the heels of its launch, Litmus Music announced that Monti Olson has joined as president. Olson will lead music rights acquisitions for Litmus, co-founded by Hank Forsyth and Dan McCarroll in partnership with Carlyle Global Credit, which initially committed $500 million in equity and debt. Olson joins Litmus with over 20 years of music […]]]>

On the heels of its launch, Litmus Music announced that Monti Olson has joined as president. Olson will lead music rights acquisitions for Litmus, co-founded by Hank Forsyth and Dan McCarroll in partnership with Carlyle Global Credit, which initially committed $500 million in equity and debt.

Olson joins Litmus with over 20 years of music industry experience, most recently as Executive Vice President/Head of BMG Music Rights Music Publishing North America, where he led the national market division of music and was responsible for developing and executing its growth strategy and frontline/catalogue acquisition strategy and execution.

Olson previously served as senior vice president of A&R at Warner Bros. Records, Executive Vice President/Co-Head of A&R at Universal Music Publishing Group and Senior Vice President/Head of A&R at BMG Music Publishing. He is also co-founder of the famous vinyl reissue company Original Recordings Group.

“I’ve had the unique privilege of working with music creators throughout my career, and I believe everything I’ve done so far has prepared me for this moment,” Olson said. “I’m honored that my friends Dan and Hank have asked me to join them in building a world-class music rights company, and I thank Matt and everyone at Carlyle for their trust in me and their belief in the power of the music.”

“Monti has been a trusted friend and colleague for decades,” Forsyth and McCarroll say. “His passion for music, deep industry knowledge and relationships, business experience and integrity are valued by the entire team. We are so grateful that he has chosen to join us on this exciting journey as his next chapter of his career.”

Matt Settle, Managing Director of Carlyle Global Credit, said: “We are delighted to welcome Monti to the Litmus team. He brings significant industry expertise that will build on and complement the talent of the team, which we believe will serve as a differentiator for Litmus. Hit.”

Having operated at the highest levels of the music industry, the founding members of Litmus have collectively maintained deep ties with record labels, distributors, artist managers and the artists themselves. Olson’s addition to the Litmus team furthers its mission of creating value for artists and investors through thoughtful music management.

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TaFMA talks about the current musical scenario of Nagaland | Morung Express https://alabamabluegrass.org/tafma-talks-about-the-current-musical-scenario-of-nagaland-morung-express/ Sat, 13 Aug 2022 19:32:43 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/tafma-talks-about-the-current-musical-scenario-of-nagaland-morung-express/ TaFMA Conference on Scope and Scale of Music in Today’s Economy held at YBIM, Dimapur on 13th August. (Morung Photo) News Morung Express Dimapur | August 13 Drawing attention to the need to introspect and analyze the possibilities for the growth of the music industry in Nagaland, the Task Force for Music and the Arts […]]]>

TaFMA Conference on Scope and Scale of Music in Today’s Economy held at YBIM, Dimapur on 13th August. (Morung Photo)

News Morung Express
Dimapur | August 13

Drawing attention to the need to introspect and analyze the possibilities for the growth of the music industry in Nagaland, the Task Force for Music and the Arts (TaFMA) in collaboration with Yodh-Beth International Ministry ( YBIM) organized a conference on “Scope and Scale of Music in Today’s Economy”, at YBIM Chapel Hall, Duncan Basti, Dimapur on August 13.

Kashito Kiba, Founding Director and General Manager of PHETO Music & Film Academy, speaking on the main theme of the event, shared his personal opinions and experiences of working in the music industry for over 25 years .

Initially, he briefly highlighted the change in the way music was consumed, moving from vinyl, cassette, CD and currently to digital/mp3 files. He noted that online platforms such as Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music and YouTube have now reshaped the way musicians get known to their listeners around the world.

As such, Kiba emphasized the need to also use technology to create and promote music in the state. Specifically regarding the technical aspects of sound systems, he observed the lack of know-how among the Nagas. This, he felt, “creates trust issues between our employees and those outside because they don’t trust us to run big shows.”

He therefore appealed to the need to have sensible, efficient and intellectual sound engineers in the state with a sense of professionalism in the work they do. Furthermore, he mentioned how young unemployed people can also benefit from professional sound engineering courses offered by the government.

Discussing aspects of local talent, Kiba regretted that a lot of artists give up halfway through their career because they lack a vision of sound and also because they see music not as a full-time career. but as a part-time job. In this scenario, he called on upcoming local artists and musicians to take their career seriously as it has huge potential for them in the long run.

He further mentioned the need to create “new sound and melody” using elements of Naga folk music as he has a huge overseas market. However, he reminded the Nagas not to compromise on quality and effort at the same time.

“Concept” was another element that Kiba insisted on when it came to creating music. Having real reasons and knowing the end goal will automatically create great music, he said.

Furthermore, he pointed out how the government has made tremendous efforts for the growth of the music industry in Nagaland. At the same time, it is also promoting a considerable number of young Naga musicians not only within the state but also internationally, he claimed.

Accordingly, Kiba encouraged young people to be bold, confident and enterprising in their vision and approach to music as a career.

During the program, several special numbers and dance performances were presented by members of Yodh-Beth International Theological College & Seminary and individuals such as Khrutsulo Vero, Visano Kikon, Rhonbemo Humtsoe and Vini K Chishi.

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Blake Shelton has accepted that the end of his career in the country is coming https://alabamabluegrass.org/blake-shelton-has-accepted-that-the-end-of-his-career-in-the-country-is-coming/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 03:04:28 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/blake-shelton-has-accepted-that-the-end-of-his-career-in-the-country-is-coming/ All good things must come to an end, including careers in country music. Despite their heritage, there’s a reason you don’t hear Johnny Cash or Loretta Lynn hits on the radio very often. Eventually they give way to Dolly Partons and George Straits, who in turn reminisce about their careers as others like Blake Shelton […]]]>

All good things must come to an end, including careers in country music. Despite their heritage, there’s a reason you don’t hear Johnny Cash or Loretta Lynn hits on the radio very often. Eventually they give way to Dolly Partons and George Straits, who in turn reminisce about their careers as others like Blake Shelton and Carrie Underwood warm up.

Shelton is one of the biggest stars in country music right now. But a life steeped in the country music industry means he knows it won’t last forever. Shelton may be relishing the fame he’s gained now. But the country icon says he’s prepared to hang it all up when the time comes.

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More moolah for social media music creators + all the biggest tracks in the industry https://alabamabluegrass.org/more-moolah-for-social-media-music-creators-all-the-biggest-tracks-in-the-industry/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 03:06:44 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/more-moolah-for-social-media-music-creators-all-the-biggest-tracks-in-the-industry/ Lyrics by Christie Eliezer AIR Awards Celebrate Warren Costello, Gurrumul Estate’s Return to Court, and More! Not up to date with all the recent happenings in the music industry? We don’t blame you. Here’s a roundup of all the biggest Australian music industry news from the past fortnight. Headlines : Native Tongue bought by the […]]]>

Lyrics by Christie Eliezer

AIR Awards Celebrate Warren Costello, Gurrumul Estate’s Return to Court, and More!

Not up to date with all the recent happenings in the music industry? We don’t blame you. Here’s a roundup of all the biggest Australian music industry news from the past fortnight.

Headlines :

  • Native Tongue bought by the American publisher Concord.
  • Golden Robot launches an exclusively feminine label.
  • More moolah for the creators of Facebook, Snapchat.

Keep up to date with the latest industry news here.

Native Tongue acquired by the American publisher Concord

The Australian and New Zealand (ANZ) publisher Native Tongue has been acquired by the American giant Concord.

The price to pay is staggering. No details were given. But the British trade magazine Music Business Worldwide put it to an eight-figure sum in US dollars.

Concord is certainly cashed in: the biggest growing independent company in recent years, it turned down a $5 billion takeover offer in April.

Concord will establish its first ANZ office in Melbourne, under the leadership of Native Tongue Managing Director Jaime Gough and SVP Chelsea Gough, and their management team including David Nash, VP Publishing, and Matt Tanner, VP A&R.

John Minch, President of Concord’s International Publishing, said: “Australia and New Zealand are important music markets in their own right and it’s a region we’ve wanted to invest in for many years.

“This will be an important strategic step for Concord in coordinating our publishing initiatives in Asia, which Jaime will be handling.”

Native Tongue was founded in 2003 by Chris Gough and run since 2014 by brothers Jaime and Chelsea.

“It provides our local writers with a truly international organization capable of maximizing their potential around the world,” said Chris Gough.

NT’s roster includes Courtney Barnett, Stuart Crichton (Backstreet Boys, Kesha, Kygo), M-Phazes (Ruel, Remi Wolf), Sophie Curtis (Cosmos Midnight, Jessica Mauboy, aespa), Sir Dave Dobbyn, Jon Hume (Dean Lewis , Sofi Tukker), Don McGlashan, Steve Rusch (Clinton Kane), Gin Wigmore and Marlon Williams.

Some like Ciara Muscat (NiziU, Twice) and Tim Tan (Enhypen, Seventeen) were among Native Tongue’s hits in Asia, which included five #1 Korean releases and two consecutive #1 albums in Japan in early 2022.

The AIR Awards celebrate Warren Costello

The August 4 AIR Awards honored the late Warren Costello with the 2022 Outstanding Achievement Award for supporting independent artists for over 30 years through the Liberation and Bloodlines labels.

The five thousand dollar professional development award from a global independent advocacy group goes to Warren’s daughter, Caitlin Costello, to further her career as an entertainment lawyer.

The best independent label went to Johann Ponniah’s I OH YOU.

Gurrumul Estate matter back to court

The question of who will administer Gurrumul’s estate continues to be debated in the NT Supreme Court.

His daughter, Jasmine Yunupingu, has applied to run the estate, NT News reported.

The musician stipulated in his will that all posthumous earnings would be shared equally between Jasmine and her foundation.

According to court documents, Gurrumul had asked Mark T Grose of his label Skinnyfish to administer the estate.

Grose had asked the court to do so but withdrew this year with his lawyer explaining that he had not appreciated “the legal issues involved”.

The legal maze includes a number of women who have a legitimate right to inheritance.

They include his wife, a common-law partner, and the possibility of a third wife/common-law partner. The matter returns to court on August 26.

Gurrumul was inducted into the National Indigenous Music Awards (NIMA) Hall of Fame on Saturday August 6 at the Darwin Amphitheater.

Past inductees were Warumpi Band, Archie Roach, Roger Knox, Kev Carmody and Gurrumul’s former band, Yothu Yindi.

To coincide, a Gurrumul-themed exhibition has started at the Australian Music Vault in Melbourne, featuring an essay by award-winning journalist Tracee Hutchison.

Audoo Inks Song Detection Agreement with APRA AMCOS

British public performance royalty technology startup Audoo has signed a song detection deal with APRA AMCOS in Australia and New Zealand.

It helps ensure more accurate royalty payments on public performances in bars, cafes, dance schools, gyms and retail stores.

Audoo’s revolutionary audio meters are first deployed in six major cities: Adelaide, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra and Auckland.

Ten artists win sound recording grants

Ten artists won $15,000 each to participate in new sound recordings. This was the ninth round for the Phonographic Performance Company of Australia (PPCA) and the Australia Council for the Arts, grossing $807,000 over the years.

The 10 are Nina Wilson for the first album; Matthew Keegan for multicultural band The Three Seas to record at Peter Gabriel’s Real World Studios in the UK; and Angela (Angie) Hart to record her third solo album about mental health, intergenerational trauma, domestic violence, infertility and grief.

Lucas Abela will merge his textured glass noise with the thunderous drumming of Zach Hill from Death Grips. Australian-Japanese artist Taka Perry is releasing a bilingual English and Japanese EP using artists from both countries.

Melbourne pianist and composer Natalie Bartsch to reinterpret her 2021 album Hope in a jazz/post-rock vein. Tiana Naug records an album paying homage to her Samoan and Indian culture and dance music.

Ryan Hutcheson and Barkindji Song Woman are making an album of “cultural and humanitarian significance” and Frenzal Rhomb will complete a record started in 2018.

Tania Frazer records five new works to highlight the didgeridoo.

Class action lawsuit against NSW cops

Redfern and Slater & Gordon Law Center launched a class action against NSW Police for those ‘unlawfully searched’ at festivals.

More than 100 women are said to have endured what they described as “humiliating” searches over three years, which some in the legal community have called illegal.

Advanced course for artist managers

The Association of Artist Managers is looking for six artist managers who own medium-sized to established businesses for its new Revive professional development program, funded by the Australia Council.

It will be delivered virtually by Compton School founder David Court through short lectures, exercises, feedback and discussion, and participants will develop a personal business plan including a self-management to-do list. , professional development and business planning.

All the details about herethe application deadline is August 18.

Golden Robot launches an exclusively feminine label

Sydney/LA Golden Robot founder Mark Alexander-Erber’s long-standing plan to create a women-only brand has come to fruition.

Archangel Records is run by Golden Robot executives Jasmine Robins and Kay McRae.

His launch numbers include Meeanjin/Brisbane-based singer-songwriter Ella Fence, SCALLER in Indonesia, and Texas alternative rock Tough On Fridays.

More moolah for creators of Facebook, Snapchat

Creators are online to generate more funds through Facebook and Snapchat initiatives.

At Facebook, music revenue sharing is available to select people whose videos (excluding live and short uploads) use licensed tracks from Facebook’s song library.

Snapchat will pay DistroKid creators monthly grants of up to $100,000 through the “Sounds” creator fund. Videos created with music from Sounds on Snapchat have collectively generated over 2.7 billion videos created and over 183 billion views.

Grant McLennan Scholarship Opening

Now in its fourteenth year, applications are open for the 2022 Grant McLennan Fellowship, which offers $15,000 to live in New York, London or Berlin to immerse themselves in a foreign and vibrant musical culture to develop their artistic skills.

The current recipient, Brisbane guitarist, songwriter and singer Jack Bratt lives in New York and is writing his second album.

The scholarship is funded by the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland and presented by QMusic. The deadline is 11:59 p.m. (AEST) on Monday, August 29.

Head here for more.

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Major expansion announced for Music College – FE News https://alabamabluegrass.org/major-expansion-announced-for-music-college-fe-news/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 11:03:48 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/major-expansion-announced-for-music-college-fe-news/ Building on the phenomenal success of its inaugural college in Brighton, renowned music education college WaterBear has unveiled plans for the opening of its second college. WaterBear Sheffield will open in September 2023, providing an additional choice of venue for independent artists and student musicians wishing to embrace WaterBear’s philosophy of building a sustainable, long-term […]]]>

Building on the phenomenal success of its inaugural college in Brighton, renowned music education college WaterBear has unveiled plans for the opening of its second college.

WaterBear Sheffield will open in September 2023, providing an additional choice of venue for independent artists and student musicians wishing to embrace WaterBear’s philosophy of building a sustainable, long-term career in the music industry.

Founded by music education pioneers Adam Bushell and Bruce John Dickinson, and with BA (Hons) and MA degrees awarded by Falmouth University, WaterBear has built a reputation for its dedication to expert one-on-one mentoring, targeted class size and exclusive development. opportunities in the music industry. The college offers courses across the music spectrum, including songwriting, audio production, electronic music, performance, and corporate/business, as well as access to shows in its own venue .

Since opening in September 2018, the WaterBear site in Brighton has seen many successes, helping students connect with an audience and coaching them on how to maintain full control of their careers, down to stadium level and beyond. WaterBear has already built up an impressive body of alumni, including Sacha Skarbek, a Grammy-nominated songwriter and two-time Ivor Novello winner who has worked with artists such as Samantha Mumba and Beverley Knight, and who has also played a key role in the development of James Blunt with whom he wrote the world number 1 hit ‘You’re Beautiful’.

Co-founder Adam Bushell comments on the expansion plans:

“Thanks to our outstanding students – who will forever champion us – our unparalleled reputation for specialist music education quickly spread and we began to attract the attention of talent across the country.

“Our group’s name is taken from one of the toughest creatures on the planet, the water bear. We work closely with each student to ensure they have all the knowledge and support they need to develop a truly sustainable career to handle any setbacks or pitfalls they encounter along the way.

“The national recognition of our philosophy of education is heartening, as the opening of a college in the North has always been in our sights, after all the North itself is somewhat unrivaled in its musical talent and its industrial production,” adds WaterBear co-founder Bruce John Dickinson. — who in 2001 co-founded the now successful BIMM (British and Irish Modern Music) institute.

“We will open our college on the site of the iconic Gatecrasher nightclub building on Arundel Street, Sheffield. Gatecrasher was not only a global icon, but to many is a Sheffield treasure,” Bushell continues.

“Through our rich program of BA (Hons) Degrees and MA music courses, we hope to channel the creative spirit that Gatecrasher pioneered and imbue it with our own educational dynamism.”

An educational drive that, during their time at BIMM, saw Dickinson and Bushell help shape the musical careers of now-famous artists including George Ezra, James Bay, Tom Odell, Beth Rowley, The Kooks, Fickle Friends and many more. others.

Recommend0 recommendationsPosted in Education

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The Beyoncé-Kelis drama is a window into an age-old music industry problem https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-beyonce-kelis-drama-is-a-window-into-an-age-old-music-industry-problem/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 11:06:12 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-beyonce-kelis-drama-is-a-window-into-an-age-old-music-industry-problem/ Beyoncé, left (Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images for Disney); Kelis (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for Spotify) Editor’s note: The following article is an editorial, and the opinions expressed are those of the author. Read more opinions on the Grio. Beyoncé’s new album Renaissance flowed into my life like a sonic ray of sunshine. It’s […]]]>

Beyoncé, left (Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images for Disney); Kelis (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for Spotify)

Editor’s note: The following article is an editorial, and the opinions expressed are those of the author. Read more opinions on the Grio.

Beyoncé’s new album Renaissance flowed into my life like a sonic ray of sunshine. It’s so fun, so house, so club and so dance, and there are so many ear-candy moments—the pre-chorus on “Move”: “My friends and I went out to play! Fireworks and champagne/Chantilly lace…” or the moving rhythm of “Break My Soul”. The song “Energy” is yet another heat rock on an album full of them, but this one led to controversy that opened Pandora’s box for me as someone who watches the music industry. for decades. I don’t consider this gossip. I see it as a window into the world of recording artists and the people who determine who gets paid for their music.

The original version of “Energy” interpolated Kelis’ signature song “Milkshake,” which elicited an angry reaction from Kelis on Instagram. Beyonce removed interpolation of the song, but Kelis’ comments left me with questions about how the artists interact with each other and how they get screwed.

Beyoncé removes the tween

One of Kelis’ main complaints is that Beyoncé didn’t call her to tell her she sampled her. She’s not talking about officially deleting the song — that would go through lawyers and executives before it landed on Kelis’ desk (if she owned part of the song’s edit). She talks about what she calls “common decency,” one artist warning another that they’ve used their stuff. A sign of respect.

I didn’t know it was customary in the music world for a star to call another star and say, “Hey, I used your song to make a new one.” Is this how it is in the club of the great recording artists? Kelis claims it does – she names a singer who called her after using her music – but I had never heard of this custom before. I called a few friends, longtime music industry executives and artists, to figure it out. These people have been talking in the background because they are not directly involved in either side of the “Energy” situation. (I also called the folks at Pharrell who declined to comment.) My friends – people who have helped me understand the intricacies of the music industry in the past – have all said that if two artists had a relationship or a friendship, then yes, it’s normal to make a call like that. But if you are not friends, there is no obligation or expectation of such a call. This call is not about money. It’s about showing respect.

If Kelis didn’t know about the song until it was released, that means Beyoncé and her crew didn’t have to clear it with Kelis, which means she has no credits. writing – anyone credited as a songwriter must sign for the new song to be erased. Kelis, on Instagram, said Pharrell “cheated” her out of her publishing rights. Kelis doesn’t have a writing credit on “Milkshake.” The writers of this song are credited as Pharrell Williams and Chad Hugo—the Neptunes. We’ll probably never know if Pharrell and Chad are the only real authors of “Milkshake.” We’ll probably never know how much or how much Kelis contributed to this record, but she’s been talking for years about losing her edit to Pharrell. In 2020 she told the Guardian she had done nothing sales of her first two albums, which were produced entirely by the Neptunes because she was “flagrantly deceived and lied to”. She told the Guardian she was promised a three-way split but the contracts were worded differently. She said, “Their argument is, ‘Well, you signed it.’ I’m like, ‘Yeah, I signed what I was told, and I was too young and too stupid to check it.'”

It’s not uncommon for singers to help write a song for their own album and then have their songwriting credit erased. There’s a long, sad history of younger artists giving up publishing or having more experienced people push them out of credits. An example: longtime Prince bassist Brown Mark said in his recent autobiography My life in the purple kingdom that he did significant work on Prince’s classic “Kiss” that went uncredited. He told me in a interview on my podcast Touré show that if he had gotten even a small piece of that song, he would be financially set up for life, so there’s a lot at stake when considering who is credited with writing a song. And it’s not just editing that the bigger artists sometimes take from the smaller ones – it’s not unusual for the big pop stars, the people who are the backbone of the industry, to take melodies, rhythms, dances or fashion ideas from small artists who are not in a position to complain. The old adage “good artists borrow, great artists steal” is also part of the music industry. Kelis alludes to it, saying that Beyoncé “stole me before.”

One thing my friends saw in Kelis’ comments was an anger that many artists feel. It’s very difficult to make a living as a recording artist these days – for every Beyoncé who is worth nearly half a billion, there are 10,000 singers who are barely middle class or downright struggling. It costs a lot of money to make an album, and in the current model artists are supposed to give away music for free – the virtual pennies they get from streaming services just give it away. The only place most artists make real money these days is on tour or if they can use their artistry to turn into an ancillary business like Rihanna did using her fame and hiding place to build Fenty.

But this whole hamster wheel of making music to make money some other way isn’t viable for most. Many artists are upset that the industry prevents them from making money doing what they love to do: making music. Kelis’ anger about the way the industry works is not an aberration. Many artists feel the same way. I saw that anger boiling over for a while – years ago a successful artist told me the label owed them between $5 and $10 million. They had been so upset about it for so long that they were paralyzed. My first question was how could an artist be so unsure of what was due to him? How could you not know if your employer owes you $5 or $10 million?

Kelis accuses Beyoncé of sampling her music without her blessing:

Well, that’s partly because industry payment and accounting practices are opaque. When you release an album, guess who’s counting the number of records you’ve sold: the label. This number indicates how much you make, but there is no incentive for labels to be honest and pay artists all their due. Several people have told me over the years that being a recording artist is like doing a job and your salary goes to your boss, not you. You never even get to see it. Your boss tells you how much you earned and then pays you. Would you feel comfortable in this system? Many recording artists are fed up with all of this.

At the end of Kelis’ Instagram thoughts, she says “Something has to change” and she’s right. Artists aren’t treated fairly by the industry, but we’re in a world where artists have more opportunity than ever to get their music straight to people. I wonder if in the years to come we’ll see artists start to bypass the traditional system and distribute music themselves and find ways to make sure they feel respected.


Touré, theGrio.com

Touré hosts the “Touré Show” podcast and the “Who Was Prince?” He is also the author of seven books.

TheGrio is FREE on your TV via Apple TV, Amazon Fire, Roku and Android TV. Please download theGrio mobile apps today!

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Nicky Youre already knows what he wants to do “once my music career is kind of over” – Deltaplex News https://alabamabluegrass.org/nicky-youre-already-knows-what-he-wants-to-do-once-my-music-career-is-kind-of-over-deltaplex-news/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 10:40:38 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/nicky-youre-already-knows-what-he-wants-to-do-once-my-music-career-is-kind-of-over-deltaplex-news/ You might be the greatest musician in the world, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you know anything about the music industry. You’d think the “Sunroof” singer Nicky you are seems to be ahead of the game since graduating from college with a degree in international business. But according to Nicky, it’s only helped him “a […]]]>

You might be the greatest musician in the world, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you know anything about the music industry. You’d think the “Sunroof” singer Nicky you are seems to be ahead of the game since graduating from college with a degree in international business. But according to Nicky, it’s only helped him “a little bit” as he tries to navigate the industry.

“I don’t think I learned much at school,” he laughs. “I think it just helped my entrepreneurial spirit with … how to think about certain things and think critically. Because the music industry is, like, the most complex, complex thing I’ve ever seen.

“So it’s super, super interesting, but having some kind of entrepreneurial spirit helps me a lot,” the California native continues. “And ultimately, I want to get into the business side of things once, you know, my music career is sort of over.”

Currently, Nicky has only released three songs, but he is already planning his next move. In fact, he already knows what he doesn’t want to do behind the scenes of business: be a manager.

Nicky explains: “I hadn’t realized all that managers did until I had my manager. So I don’t know if I want to be a manager because… we text like every day from 9am to 12pm and we’re always doing something!

Nicky adds that he would prefer a job in A&R, meaning he would seek out and sign talent to a record company and oversee their artistic development. “I feel like I have a good sense of things that are really cool,” he explains. “And musically, I think that would be a cool job for me.”

“But I don’t know,” he laughs. “That’s going to be hopefully in the very, very long future.”

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

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Will TikTok Music be the next big podcast platform? https://alabamabluegrass.org/will-tiktok-music-be-the-next-big-podcast-platform/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 18:04:26 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/will-tiktok-music-be-the-next-big-podcast-platform/ Selena Gomez would develop a A hard worker to restart, and I don’t know what to think about it. As the daughter of a girl from Staten Island who worked on Wall Street in the 80s, the original is too close to my heart. In any event, let the river flow – Audacy and Snap […]]]>

Selena Gomez would develop a A hard worker to restart, and I don’t know what to think about it. As the daughter of a girl from Staten Island who worked on Wall Street in the 80s, the original is too close to my heart.

In any event, let the river flow – Audacy and Snap are trying to be more like TikTok, TikTok is trying to be more like Spotify, and Spotify is trying to charge you extra for a play button.

Audacy’s new podcast discovery app removes a page from TikTok’s playbook

Radio giant Audacy has acquired podcast discovery app Moonbeam, according to app founder Paul English. The discovery was a huge challenge for the industry, and Moonbeam is responding to it by operating less like a traditional podcast player and more like a social platform.

“We developed a feature called ‘Beam’ which started playing an episode immediately. If you didn’t like it, you swiped and we then played another show,” English wrote. in a blog post. “This approach was very inspired by TikTok, the best video discovery app.”

Audacy previously acquired top production teams such as Pineapple Street Studios and Cadence13 and has its own app for podcasts and radio streaming. Audacy did not say whether Moonbeam will continue to operate as a standalone app or whether its functionality will be integrated into the Audacy app.

English declined to disclose terms of the acquisition at The Boston Globeand Audacy did not immediately return hot capsulerequest for confirmation of the agreement. Audacy may provide the details when it is presentation of results on Friday.

Spotify’s latest premium feature is a play button

Premium subscribers will now have access to separate play and shuffle buttons in the app. Spotify’s default shuffle has been the bane of extremely serious artists and playlist builders everywhere, so the development is probably welcome. Last year, the company introduced a dedicated play button for albums with some persuasion from Adele, who said, “We don’t create albums with as much care and think about our track list without raison.”

I’m all about the shuffle, but my Edge His colleague Chris Welch argued that an app-wide play button just for premium subscribers is an odd choice. “It seems a little silly that Spotify is now using buttons and its user interface as a differentiator between the service’s free and paid offerings, but here we are,” he wrote.

Acast’s investment spree is coming to an end

Swedish podcast distribution and advertising company Acast has been making big moves into the US market lately, announcing its $34 million acquisition of podcast database Podchaser last month and an ad sales deal three years with WTF with Marc Maron in May. As the economy depresses ad revenue, Acast will slow its frenzy, executives said Tuesday during its mid-year presentation to investors.

Emily Villatte, Chief Financial Officer of Acast, said a call to investors that the company “will slow down this pace of investment”. But it looks like Acast’s expansion strategy is already paying off, posting 72% growth in North America in the second quarter, about 2.5 times its growth rate in Europe. It also adds podcasts to a clip, representing 66,000 shows, up from around 40,000 at the end of 2021.

But even with the addition of new shows and tools, the slowdown in the ad market has forced the company to lower its guidance on annual sales growth until 2025 from 60% to 40-45%. Acast shares are down almost 5% on the news, and that may be a warning sign for the entire industry. When the Interactive Advertising Bureau predicted the market would reach $4 billion by 2024, it depended on a healthy advertising market. If things continue, this figure could be out of reach.

Snap launches creative fund for independent artists

It’s been a a difficult few weeks for Snap, the company is therefore making a play for TikTok music artists. Last week, the company announced the Snapchat Sounds Creator Fund in partnership with DIY music distributor DistroKid.

Snap is offering attractive grants up to $100,000 to top music creators who distribute their tracks on the platform through DistroKid. In addition, selected artists will be placed in more visible places on the platform, such as Snapchat Lens or in Spotlight. Eligible entrants must be based in the United States and 16 years of age or older.

“We want to support independent and emerging artists who are driving creation on Snapchat,” Ted Suh, global head of music partnerships at Snap, said in a statement. “By providing meaningful funding and creative support, our goal is for artists to feel empowered to continue creating and pursuing a career in music.”

Snap introduced Sounds, which allows users to include music videos in their posts, in 2020. But its impact on the music industry has been fairly minimal so far. TikTok remains the music most influential discovery tooland it may not end there…

TikTok Music could be the next big podcast app

TikTok parent ByteDance could be coming for Spotify lunch. As first spotted by Initiated, the Chinese company filed an application with the US Patent and Trademark Office for “TikTok Music” in May. In addition to music and videos, the file says that the new app would also support podcasts and digital radio content.

If a TikTok Music app comes to fruition, it wouldn’t be ByteDance’s first streamer. In 2020, it launched Resso, which is available in India, Brazil, and Indonesia (which is exactly where Spotify wants to expand). In June, Resso added podcasts to their library thanks to a partnership with Acast.

Despite warnings from people like Senator Mark Warner and Joe Rogan on TikTok’s data practices, it seems basically unstoppable. Maybe Rogan will change his tune if he becomes a major podcast platform and his Spotify contract expires.

That’s all for today! Friday, I leave for Scandinavia, the country of sound technology fjords and sandwiches open, so you’ll hear from Jake the next two Tuesdays. We meet on the other side.

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Iowa City musician Alyx Rush gives insight into his career as a pop artist https://alabamabluegrass.org/iowa-city-musician-alyx-rush-gives-insight-into-his-career-as-a-pop-artist/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 02:21:19 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/iowa-city-musician-alyx-rush-gives-insight-into-his-career-as-a-pop-artist/ Alyx Rush explains how he got into the music industry, which inspires his work and his music-making process. Alyx Rush’s love for music started with her mother. As a young child sitting in church, Rush found himself involved in the church band his mother led, singing and playing guitar. What started as a pastime in […]]]>

Alyx Rush explains how he got into the music industry, which inspires his work and his music-making process.


Alyx Rush’s love for music started with her mother. As a young child sitting in church, Rush found himself involved in the church band his mother led, singing and playing guitar.

What started as a pastime in church soon turned into so much more. With the full support of his parents, Rush immersed himself in the world of music production. In 2012, Rush wrote a song called Apocalypse about the hypothetical end of the world, which he would eventually take to a recording studio in Chicago. This song has since been deleted from his discography, so it is not available.

“That’s where I kind of set foot in a studio and started recording my own stuff. It was a really cool and very eye-opening experience for me,” Rush said in an interview with The Iowan Daily.

Between gigs in small bars and working to write more music, Rush found a manager in 2015 who was able to get him into a recording studio in Manhattan after his experience in Chicago. Rush said his visit to New York and his exposure to music there is what really pushed him to pursue music in a professional setting. Rush said that even though he wasn’t signed at the time, it was cool to be around other people who were making music professionally.

“It really allowed me to hear the music and know what I’m listening to,” Rush said.

RELATED: 80/35 Festival Brings Variety to Iowa Music Scene

Rush said that while he strives to create his own sound, he certainly draws inspiration from other music industry legends. He said he looked to artists like Frank Ocean and SZA, among others, for the overall style he wanted to capture.

The themes that Rush typically addresses with his music tend to show up in songs about love – more specifically, heartbreak. Rush said he didn’t do it intentionally, but those most painful emotions are what tend to come through throughout his writing process.

When creating a song, Rush said it usually starts with him and his guitar. After settling on a general topic, he said the end result flowed from him, which is one of his favorite parts of music-making.

“For me, the music is so cool because it’s so fluid. You can do whatever you want with it. You can explore different sounds, you can explore different genres,” Rush said. “It’s really cool to collaborate with other people in the music world because it’s cool to see how they influence your sound. It’s cool to see how my sound influences them.

Growing up in small town Iowa, Rush said her recent move to Iowa City was a great experience.

“After moving here, there were so many people who kind of blew me away with the talent they had and their ability to collaborate,” he said. “It kind of helped me adapt to this new music scene and helped me find the sound I was looking for. It’s been amazing so far.

RELATED: Paimon Alipour finds passion as a DJ, music creator and film producer

Rush said one of the hardest parts of the industry is knowing that there will always be people who don’t like him or his sounds. However, Rush said he seeks to use this as motivation to improve.

“It’s just really rewarding to be able to see that I can kind of see myself growing as a musician,” Rush said. “It’s really gratifying for me because music is just a very difficult industry to break into.”

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Lyricist Sameer Anjaan says ‘the music industry is dead’ https://alabamabluegrass.org/lyricist-sameer-anjaan-says-the-music-industry-is-dead/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 01:12:40 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/lyricist-sameer-anjaan-says-the-music-industry-is-dead/ Lyricist Sameer Anjaan spoke about his latest song Aa Bhi Jaa exclusively with Hindustan Times. He also shared his thoughts on the music industry amid remix culture and single song. Renowned lyricist Sameer Anjaan is happy and satisfied with his brand new song titled Aa Bhi Jaa amid the ongoing remix culture in the music […]]]>

Lyricist Sameer Anjaan spoke about his latest song Aa Bhi Jaa exclusively with Hindustan Times. He also shared his thoughts on the music industry amid remix culture and single song.

Renowned lyricist Sameer Anjaan is happy and satisfied with his brand new song titled Aa Bhi Jaa amid the ongoing remix culture in the music scene. Starring Rajniesh Duggal and Rozlyn Khan, the music video is directed by Prini Siddhant Madhav and sung by Farhan Sabri. Read more: 3,524 songs, 650 movies, 1 world record, meet lyricist Sameer Anjaan



Reflecting on the response to Aa Bhi Jaa, Sameer Anjaan told Hindustan Times, “Anyone who listened to the song loved it. It was shot very well. Singles are going to be a trend in the market because I think the music industry is totally over right now. I can see the result after releasing the music from the movies, the music is nowhere. I think it’s a good time to work on singles. People appreciate our song. Read also :

Sameer Anjaan wrote the lyrics for the title track Bhool Bhulaiyaa 2 by Kartik Aaryan. When asked about the inspiration for the songs, he joked, “Aa Bhi Jaa isn’t inspired by any old or new songs. It’s a visually appealing song. While we can’t stop the recreational songs, it has no future. It’s like junk food. It only works because those songs are already connected to the audience. I think new music composers are not going to give 100% freedom to create their own stuff. They are pressured by the producing company and others. The producers are also not very inclined to work hard in the songs. That’s why this remix trend is on. But it won’t last long. »



“90% of the recreated songs are just me. You just name it, every second song is mine. Why did Bhool Bhulaiyaa 2 new song work? It had to because most 90s songs are mine,” the 64-year-old singer added. He believes the concept of unique songs will soon gain popularity in India, just like in the western world.

Sameer was also close to Bhupinder Singh, who died on July 18. Reminiscing about Do Deewane singer Shahar Mein, he shared, “I learned of Bhupinder’s death after a reporter called. He was not well. I knew he had health issues. We expected something to happen to him soon. He was serious. He suffered for a long time. Without a doubt, he was one of the best singers and he has a totally different kind of voice. I’m lucky he also sang 1 or 2 of my songs. He was a very nice person and a very good musician too. He played the instrument very well.





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