Music industry – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:09:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://alabamabluegrass.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music industry – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ 32 32 See Music Data Starter Chartmetric Pitch Deck Used To Raise $ 2 Million https://alabamabluegrass.org/see-music-data-starter-chartmetric-pitch-deck-used-to-raise-2-million/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:09:24 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/see-music-data-starter-chartmetric-pitch-deck-used-to-raise-2-million/ Chartmetric is a data and analysis tool designed for the music industry and creators. The platform is used by more than 2,000 customers, including the three major labels. Read the pitch deck that helped the company raise $ 2 million in seed funding. For decades, determining the popular music of the day hasn’t been that […]]]>
  • Chartmetric is a data and analysis tool designed for the music industry and creators.
  • The platform is used by more than 2,000 customers, including the three major labels.
  • Read the pitch deck that helped the company raise $ 2 million in seed funding.

For decades, determining the popular music of the day hasn’t been that complicated. Consumers have mainly obtained music in two ways: through the radio and through record stores.

But the internet has changed that. First, there were online stores like iTunes; then came


Diffusion

giants like Spotify; and more recently, social media platforms like YouTube and TikTok have changed the way consumers listen to music.

Chartmetric hopes to simplify musical data again. The platform consolidates information about music consumption, including data from streaming and social media, and presents it in a digestible way to its more than 2,000 customers, which include major labels, music promoters live, independent musicians, etc.

“It’s getting overwhelming in a way,” Chartmetric founder and CEO Sung Cho told Insider. “There is more and more data that artists and labels measure and care about, and the importance of the data changes over time.”

Data goes beyond simple games. Chartmetric uses social media data to analyze fan demographics, the platforms used by fans, the best ways for artists to interact with fans, and where their songs are picked up, whether in a viral video TikTok or a popular Spotify playlist.

While a number of its competitors are connected to music platforms – Spotify offers its own in-depth measurement and analysis, and music analysis company Next Big Sound has been acquired by Pandora – Chartmetric offers data sets from from several different sources. It collects information from Spotify, Apple Music, and Amazon Music, as well as TikTok, YouTube, and Instagram.

Cho uses the example of a musician about to go on tour to explain how all of this data can be useful. The data could help them figure out where to go based on the cities their fans are in, what songs to play based on what their fans are listening to, and how best to market the tour based on what platform they are on. their fans.

“The music itself is the most important,” Cho said. “It has to be good music and the artist has to have an attractive personality to advance their career. But many artists have excellent talent – after that it’s about pitching.”

Artists and investors seem to agree and see the value of Chartmetric, which is profitable. The company said it has raised around $ 2 million in seed funding since its inception in 2015.

The main takeaways that Cho hopes investors understand? Market potential and real need for the tool, Cho said.

“Investors tell me, ‘How big can the analysis of the music industry reach? ” “, did he declare.

According to Chartmetric’s pitch deck, the music industry reached $ 21.6 billion in global revenues in 2020, and between record labels, independent artists, and tour organizers and venues, there are hundreds thousands of untapped customers.

Chartmetric also believes that its platform can also be of use to non-music creators who hope to better understand their fans. While these influencers make up only a small percentage of Chartmetric’s current user base, this is an area where the company sees potential for growth, according to the deck.

Read the 46-page pitch deck that Chartmetric used to raise $ 2 million.

Note: Some numbers and graphics in the game are written down.

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Only one EU country signs deal to save post-Brexit music tours, despite Boris Johnson vow to ‘fix’ crisis https://alabamabluegrass.org/only-one-eu-country-signs-deal-to-save-post-brexit-music-tours-despite-boris-johnson-vow-to-fix-crisis/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 18:13:05 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/only-one-eu-country-signs-deal-to-save-post-brexit-music-tours-despite-boris-johnson-vow-to-fix-crisis/ Only one of the 27 EU countries has reached an agreement to save post-Brexit musical tours despite Boris Johnson’s wish to resolve the crisis, protests an industrial group. The prime minister took the pledge under pressure nine months ago – but only Spain has signed a deal since, leaving artists to drown in costly ‘mountains […]]]>

Only one of the 27 EU countries has reached an agreement to save post-Brexit musical tours despite Boris Johnson’s wish to resolve the crisis, protests an industrial group.

The prime minister took the pledge under pressure nine months ago – but only Spain has signed a deal since, leaving artists to drown in costly ‘mountains of red tape’.

Today, the Incorporated Society of Musicians urges Liz Truss, the new Brexit minister, to reject the hard-line approach of her predecessor, David Frost, who failed to make ‘progress’.

“All problems first identified in the creative sector due to the TCA [the Brexit trade deal] still remain, ”said a letter to the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

In an article for The independent, opera singer Sarah Connolly describes the grim plight of touring artists as “a weeping, pale, undercooked, slippery slick.”

“2022 is a year that many players in the creative industries will view with concern,” writes Dame Sarah.

“Omicron is on the rise and the problems with the Brexit deal from 12 months ago are still on the rise today. My message to the government for the new year is ‘listen to us’.

The trade deal saw the UK – as The independent revealed – rejecting an EU offer to keep touring visa-free and permit-free, breaking a promise made to music organizations last year.

In March, Mr Johnson, facing serious problems getting documents to carry and transporting equipment across EU borders, told MEPs: ‘We have to fix this’.

But Lord Frost – the minister he appointed – appeared to wash his hands of the crisis and refused to say it would be resolved, before leaving cabinet.

Ministers were then attacked, including by Elton John, for falsely claiming that 21 of the EU’s 27 countries offer visa-free and work-permit-free access, while severe restrictions still exist in nearly all of them.

In its letter, the Incorporated Society of Musicians (ISM), representing 11,000 members, urges Ms Truss to change course and relaunch negotiations with EU states, while calling for a visa waiver deal with Brussels.

“The industry is now faced with mountains of red tape, which are both expensive and time consuming,” warns Deborah Annetts, its CEO.

“The proposed solutions such as bilateral agreements with EU states have not materialized, with the exception of Spain, and there are serious problems with cabotage, carnets and designated ports.

“All of these issues have a negative impact on the UK music industry and the creative industries at large, which account for £ 116 billion a year, along with finance or construction.”

To add anger, Nadine Dorries, the Culture Secretary, quickly claimed credit for the deal with Spain, allowing British musicians to work 90 days out of 180.

But industry insiders insist that organizations like the Association of British Orchestras and their Spanish counterparts have done most of the negotiation – and that doesn’t cover transport.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office has been asked to respond to the criticisms made in the letter.

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Round Hill’s Spending Madness Continues https://alabamabluegrass.org/round-hills-spending-madness-continues/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 07:36:40 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/round-hills-spending-madness-continues/ Round Hill’s spending madness continues – Round Hill Music has announced some new investments – making it three in three days. The Richardsons The fund has bought back 100% of a catalog of 308 songs from the Richardsons, Jack and his son Garth, made up of producer royalties and neighboring rights revenues. Garth Richardson is […]]]>

Round Hill’s spending madness continues – Round Hill Music has announced some new investments – making it three in three days.

The Richardsons

The fund has bought back 100% of a catalog of 308 songs from the Richardsons, Jack and his son Garth, made up of producer royalties and neighboring rights revenues. Garth Richardson is a Canadian record producer and musical engineer. He is the son of music producer Jack Richardson CM, who was described as a pioneer of the music recording industry in the 1960s and 1970s.

The catalog includes No. 1 songs “Send the Pain Below” (Chevelle), “Killing in the Name” (Rage Against the Machine), “Night Moves” (Bob Seger), “Swing Life Away” (Rise Against) and “stubborn” (Trap)

Catalog artists include Alice Cooper, Bob Seger, Rage Against The Machine, Chevelle, Nickelback, Rise Against, Trapt and Mudvayne

Garth Richardson once won Canada’s Juno Award for Producer of the Year and was nominated twice for that award and a Grammy Award.

The Junos honored Jack by naming him the recipient of the “Walt Grealis Special Achievement Award” in 1986 for his significant contribution to the Canadian music industry and renaming the “Producer of the Year” award to “Jack Richardson. Producer of the Year ”in 2003. Jack’s influence in the music industry was also recognized by inducting him into the Order of Canada

The catalog is heavily exposed to streaming, accounting for 72% of the revenue mix, with the rest being 6% physical, 5% download, 4% sync, 10% other, and 3% audio exchange.

The top five songs ranked by turnover are: “The Red” (Chevelle), “Send the Pain Below” (Chevelle), “Killing in the Name” (Rage Against the Machine), “Swing Life” (Rise Against ) and “Stubborn” (Trap).

Rebelution

The other purchase announced today was for the main recordings and music publishing assets of US reggae group Rebelution. This catalog includes the ownership of the master recordings of the entire career of Rebelution, including the share of the neighboring rights of the rights holder, and also includes the music publishing assets of Rebelution.

the wallet hadn’t had much reggae exposure before that. Part of the attraction is that the band spins a lot, playing in big venues across America, helping to propel future catalog revenues.

The acquisition is shared equally with Round Hill Private Fund III.

Founded in Isla Vista, California, we reggae band Rebelution has succeeded remarkable success of its kind since the release of its 2007 debut album, Courage to grow. In 2009, the group dominated Billboard Reggae Album Chart for the first of what would be five in a row # 1 Billboard reggae records; in 2014 they boasted of the best-selling reggae album exit of the year and in 2016, they got a Grummy nomination for best reggae album. The rebellion had Red Rocks sold-out shows, Colorado at the Greek theater, California as well as festival slots in Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza, ACL, Glastonbury and more. The group has independently sold over half a million albums to date.

The catalog features diversified revenue exhibits including, on the master side, streaming, accounting for 73% of the revenue mix, with the balance comprised of 18% publishing, 6% neighboring rights, and 3% others. In terms of geographic exposure, 90% of turnover comes from the United States, while the balance comes from other countries.

The best songs ranked by income are: Feeling Alright “,” Fade Away “,” Safe And Sound “,” Free Rein “and” Count Me In “.

RHM: Round Hill’s Spending Madness Continues

previous story | next story

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The state of the Philippine music industry and its next big move https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-state-of-the-philippine-music-industry-and-its-next-big-move/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 15:00:40 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-state-of-the-philippine-music-industry-and-its-next-big-move/ Over a year and a half has passed and no industry has been spared, including Original Pilipino Music. With Metro Manila still under Covid-19 Level 2 alert status, social events such as concerts, parties and concerts – considered the bread and butter of many OPM artists – remain off limits. Compared to other countries where […]]]>

Over a year and a half has passed and no industry has been spared, including Original Pilipino Music. With Metro Manila still under Covid-19 Level 2 alert status, social events such as concerts, parties and concerts – considered the bread and butter of many OPM artists – remain off limits. Compared to other countries where artists have started touring, it still seems like a far-fetched idea to resume crowded live performances, let alone for international artists to come as they often did before.

While a good number of OPM artists and producers flourished around this time [read, “To sing and thrive, no matter what,” also in this issue] by releasing “home-recorded” singles, filming music videos under strict health protocols and innovating through online concerts, there are those who still struggle and are forced to find other sources of income besides music. .

The following statements coming directly from the singers themselves show the state of OPM and its next big move.

“At first nagbakasyon kami. The first two weeks. Tapos after that, na-extend nang na-extend na ang ECQ. We knew we had to do something. At that time, organize virtual concerts. (Well , hanggang ngayon lang naman). Tipong can add drum tapos can maglatag ng bass, guitar, vocals, etc. Puro of old songs namin ginagawa namin dun. So naisip namin, eh di pwede pala gawin an original songs gamit ng ganitong method ! What were originally three original songs become an entire album! And with the help of the lovely folks at Backspacer Records and Sony Music PH, we were able to release “Waiting For The End To Start” on vinyl! cliché, but when life gives you alligators, go gatorade! ” – Jugs Jugueta, leader of Itchyworms.

Pitchers of Itchyworms Jugueta INSTAGRAM PHOTOS

“I’m fine. I quickly adapted from the pandemic as having been a music producer for over a decade, I usually work from home, and yet projects are limited, I continue to learn music in my spare time. ” – Bim Yance, music producer.

“I think what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. I’ve always been an optimistic person, so I took that as a challenge to become better for myself and did things that I didn’t. could never do in normal times, like going back to college. In fact, i’m better mentally now than ever, and this situation has helped me write more songs and understand what life really is. “- Chris Padilla, leader of Hilera

“Surprisingly, I did more music production at home. Projects are sent to me via the Internet, so there is no need to have a face-to-face meeting with artists or clients. – Dante Tanedo, sound engineer / producer

“I’m fine, still fine! I continued to cycle, listened to all kinds of music, took on the work-from-home vibe by learning to cook with weird recipes. Life goes on. wake up and smell the coffee. Dapat natin state of mind is pang araw-araw, hindi yung san na kaya ako next year? ”- Enzo Villegas, leader of Eevee

“Like most people around the world, I felt the impact of the pandemic as a performing artist performing and touring. Until I adjusted to the new normal in which I play and do shows online or digitally. It’s a huge blow to the lives of most musicians. With God’s blessing I got the opportunity again to record a contract with Star Music, and I’m about to release my new single. – Sheryn Régis

Sheryn Regis

Sheryn Regis

“We haven’t fully adapted to the new normal, and the situation is always tough and difficult, but since we love our job, we continue to strive to play for our fans. But with the reception we have received, it helps us keep going, and we are grateful that we can organize concerts, events (with “Global Live”, “Back in the Zone” and the upcoming “PhilKo” and “Forte”) and even produce “Pagsibol” outside of our personal activities. We want the weather to return to normal and we want everyone to be safe and healthy. ” – SB19

SB19

“I’m fine. It took me a while to adjust to the online gig setup, but I’m getting used to it now. One of the things that helped me during the pandemic was creating a Patreon account where I do exclusive content, monthly live broadcasts, and I can speak directly to fans. I’m just grateful that I can continue to connect with my fans online. ”- Clara Benin

Clara Benin

Clara Benin

“I can say that we have managed [the situation] pretty good. We turned some of our houses into virtual live and recording studios, and we released songs left and right. As a group we have collaborated with Janine Berdin, Gibbs and Leanne & Naara. I myself composed the music for the WeTV series “B&B The Story of the Battle of Brody & Brandy”, with Ian Veneracion and Iza Calzado. I also produced a song for Onin Musika, with DJ Joey Santos, and wrote the Kim Nemenzo single. If there is a will, there is a way. You just have to keep fighting. »- Yael Yuzon, leader of Sponge Cola

Yael Yuzon with her band Sponge Cola

Yael Yuzon with her band Sponge Cola

“Personally, I am in the happiest state I have ever known since the early forties because I focus more on myself and my personal interests. I have also just started college, and despite online setup, i’m lucky enough to meet new people, and by making personal connections i feel less alone during these times. i still feel fits of sadness every now and then, but i think it is now more important than ever to turn to your loved ones or whatever else you love to remind us that there is more to this life than we think. ” – Bianca

“So far, I’m doing really well. Being in a pandemic for about a year and a half is really tough, especially compared to the shows, guests, and events I usually had. Luckily, with help from different people. social media platforms, I have been very productive sharing my music with a lot of people. Especially on Kumu, by the way; this is where I spent my time having fun singing and entertaining many people. Internet users. “- Fana

“I used to say that life is not complete without the gift of music from God. It touched me even more when this pandemic hit us all. We all wake up every day with bad There are also limits to the way we do things. These constantly challenge and hamper my productivity. This has had a big impact on my mental health, affecting my creative output. I can’t imagine how I can handle it. ‘adapt and reset without music. Music has brought me healing and helped me embrace this new season, the new normal. Because seasons are temporary, we can look forward to the next best. One thing that I appreciate about this reality is that it is a bold reminder that life is too short to dwell on worry and loneliness. The smallest things now bring us happiness like never before. Although this pandemic has us took a lot of things, faith, hope and love will remain. These will continue to fuel the music I create. I hope the music I create will help heal one person at a time in my own way. “- Tri sha Denise

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The best music from Houston artists this year | 2021 https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-best-music-from-houston-artists-this-year-2021/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 19:01:26 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-best-music-from-houston-artists-this-year-2021/ 2021 was a one-year lunar launch for Houston artists: Megan Thee Stallion has won multiple Grammy’s and collaborated with K-Pop sensation BTS; Travis Scott reconnected with Drake for “Fair Trade”, Lizzo put an end to all these “rumors” with Cardi B; Tobe Nwigwe and Maxo Kream effortlessly don for Alief with their final efforts—At the […]]]>

2021 was a one-year lunar launch for Houston artists: Megan Thee Stallion has won multiple Grammy’s and collaborated with K-Pop sensation BTS; Travis Scott reconnected with Drake for “Fair Trade”, Lizzo put an end to all these “rumors” with Cardi B; Tobe Nwigwe and Maxo Kream effortlessly don for Alief with their final efforts—At the nursery Arrangements and Weight of the world; Slim Thug gave his character of Sugar Daddy Slim a real album; Paul Wall reminded us (and we certainly don’t disagree) that he is a Hall of Fame Hustler; Propain It’s not safe outside brilliantly succeeded in bringing out a rarely seen side of Walka Sauce; Big Pokey made its triumphant return with Sensei; and how could we forget Bun B and Le $ dropping the pandemic theme Far EP on New Years?

The amount of talent coming out of H-Town is at a critical level of acclaim; It’s not just a revival of our mid-2000s hip-hop domination, we’re now transcending pop, country, and all genres in between. If you’ve been stuck in the house making a permanent catastrophic scroll for a year and a half like the rest of us, you probably know the aforementioned stars, then here are our favorite Houston songs by (mostly) artists we don’t. have not yet named.

1. Monaleo, “Shoot Down Yo Block”

20-year-old artist Monaleo rocked the music industry with his viral hit, “Beating Down Yo Block”. The single track pays homage to Screwed Up Click’s Yungstar, using an excerpt from his 2000 hit, “Knocking Pictures Off Da Wall”.

2. Peyton, “Let it flow”

“My soul is a spaceship,” Peyton sings. And while we know they don’t come with mirrors, this particular vessel has looked inside for itself. Bass bangs hard, Peyton’s dreamy voice sails in the clouds, and Brice Blanco’s highly relevant verses wish for affordable therapy. “If I can get out of my mind,” Peyton assures us, “I’ll be fine.

3. Billy F. Gibbons, “Desert High”

ZZ Top’s Billy F. Gibbons takes a poetic approach with his song “Desert High”, offering a mysterious and disturbing theme. Gibbons recites the lyrics with vivid images that help listeners visualize a real desert, reminiscent of Joshua Tree, California.

4. Teezo Touchdown, “I’m just a fan”

If you had told teens in the mid-2000s that rappers would be the ones leading the pop-punk revival of the 2020s, we would have suspended our copies of Punk becomes crunk and thanked the rappers of the future for saving us. Teezo Touchdown is set to become the studded voice in the heads of emo kids around the world when he sings “Don’t mind me I’m just a fan on the wall!” “

5. Reggie with Smino, “Avalanche”

Reggie is one of a new class of artists expanding the definition of what Houston music can sound like. If you’ve been following Reggie’s path, this is the collaboration you’ve been waiting for. “Even when my quilts look like an avalanche,” Reggie sings, sounding like Andre 3000 in church, “Somehow everything in my life seems to be heaven-sent. “

6. Lebra Jolie, “And now”

It’s not since Yung Wun gave the world “Tear It Up” that a rapper has devoured a brass band with such voracity. “My foot hurts, probably because it’s on bitches’ necks / Lebra has now, fuck who’s next,” rapped Lebra Jolie. With such an awesome song and video like this, she might have it now for the foreseeable future.

7. Rodney Crowell, “Something Must Change”

Released in July, Crowell’s “Something Has to Change” was extremely relevant to the times of the ongoing pandemic and social injustices across the country. On the ballad, he sings of gluttony and pain, but hopes for a better tomorrow. Crowell appeals to our humanity in his words, “Where life has a purpose, faith has a voice.”

8. Esteban Gabriel, “Buenas Vibras”

A corrido toast to the friends you met, the same ones you ended up making money with. You don’t have to know much Spanish to know that the song title translates to “Good Vibes” and you don’t need to know Spanish at all to feel those vibrations.

9. KenTheMan, “I’m Perfect”

“North side, us in that bitch,” KenTheMan raps, and when she does, it’s more of a royal decree than just a word. Ken confidently claims his place among the new class of Houston rap heirs.

10. Rich O’Toole, “17 wild horses”

Four-story drums, hot summer night guitar riff with a breeze, Tom Petty’s influence is very apparent, and very welcome, on Texas country veteran Rich O’Toole’s big 2021 single. . “She came like 17 wild horses,” sings O’Toole, “Back against the wind.” It’s one of those songs that you can visualize by listening to over and over and over again.

11. LE $, “How now”

Following the release of his collaboration project, Far, with Bun B, The $ comes out the awesome Stay on the ground EP. “How Bout Now” was a standout piece of the project, where the laid-back emcee gets the last laughs from those who once doubted his talents.

12. Maxo Kream, “Cripstien”

Maxo Kream ends a successful year with the release of his third studio album, Weight of the world. One of his most experimental projects to date, the opening track, “Cripstian” is a vivid narration of his life, following the death of his brother, Money Madu, and the birth of his daughter.

13. Lilly Aviana, “Seasons”

Lily Aviana’s voice is divine, but there is also sin in there, and thank goodness for that. “If the season changes, my love,” sings Aviana, “All I ask is that we can keep in touch.” We don’t think she’s asking for too much.

14. Thomas Csorba, “Crystal eyes”

Thomas Csorba shows the meaning of true love in his song “Crystal Eyes”. The ballad pays homage to his wife, as the couple recently married last year.

15. Divine Body Bingo, “Last time”

God Body Bingo is the North Houston representative. His single “Last Time” is from his first album Out of the books. Using his motto “PRAISE”, he speaks divinely about how he stands out from others and describes the evolution of his manhood.

16. Doeman Dyna, “the brown soul”

The title of this song is not a false advertisement, we have a Mexican guy rapping on a soul sample, and it’s beautiful. “I grew up eating beans and rice / butter tortillas and migas, didn’t I?” / I wish my abuelo could see this life, ”Doeman raps on this triumphant thesis of a song.

17. Siddiq, “Pulp Fiction Freestyle”

Houston Host Siddiq Strengthens South and West Coast Ties Through Collaborative Project The Triangle3. On “Pulp Fiction Freestyle”, Siddiq raps confidently to a beat from King Most, speaking for Acres Homes.

18. Kam Franklin with Kareem, “Baby Please Don’t Go”

Kam Franklin and Kareem have joined forces to create a blues track that draws on country and gospel notes, transporting listeners to the modern metropolitan city we call home, to a simpler time.

19. Uncle Tino, “Orange”

What if Three 6 Mafia and UGK’s megahit “Sippin On Some Syrup” was an R&B slow jam? Well, you would listen to Uncle Tino’s “Orange”. A Tino’s stand-out crazy color album, it’s “Sippin ‘” meets Ginuwine’s “Pony”, and Tino throws in a rap verse for good measure.

20. Alaina Castillo, “Lips”

Alaina Castillo has had a successful career as the Mexican-American singer captured the hearts of thousands on Tik Tok. On her hit single “Lips”, the 21-year-old singer and songwriter passionately sings about a long-distance relationship and the need for physical contact from her significant other.

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Billie Eilish’s New Motto Explains Her Transition From ‘Identity Crisis’ To Adulthood https://alabamabluegrass.org/billie-eilishs-new-motto-explains-her-transition-from-identity-crisis-to-adulthood/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 02:46:21 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/billie-eilishs-new-motto-explains-her-transition-from-identity-crisis-to-adulthood/ Every year for the past five years, award-winning singer and songwriter Billie Eilish has spoken to Vanity Fair to reflect on her music career and life. Every year the post asks her the same questions, so it’s easy to see how the 20-year-old has grown and changed. For her fifth interview for the capsule series, […]]]>

Every year for the past five years, award-winning singer and songwriter Billie Eilish has spoken to Vanity Fair to reflect on her music career and life. Every year the post asks her the same questions, so it’s easy to see how the 20-year-old has grown and changed.

For her fifth interview for the capsule series, Eilish looked back on her responses from the past four years. She reflected on how she had grown since then and even disclosed how she experienced an ‘identity crisis’ along the way.

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Massimo Anthony Didomenico: a leading artist and music producer making his way to the top of the music industry https://alabamabluegrass.org/massimo-anthony-didomenico-a-leading-artist-and-music-producer-making-his-way-to-the-top-of-the-music-industry/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 03:11:47 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/massimo-anthony-didomenico-a-leading-artist-and-music-producer-making-his-way-to-the-top-of-the-music-industry/ A next-generation music producer and artist captivating millions of people, exuding talent, brilliance, passion, skill and expertise. The past two decades have seen the tremendous boom and growth of many different sectors and industries. The music industry, as a sector, has also grown immensely, providing countless opportunities for millions of artists and professionals across the […]]]>

A next-generation music producer and artist captivating millions of people, exuding talent, brilliance, passion, skill and expertise.

The past two decades have seen the tremendous boom and growth of many different sectors and industries. The music industry, as a sector, has also grown immensely, providing countless opportunities for millions of artists and professionals across the world. Every year new upcoming youngsters prepare to test their talent and potential within the music industry which has already faced fierce competition and saturation on some levels. Yet singers, songwriters, songwriters and producers have managed to rise to the top captivating millions of people around the world.


There is no doubt that the demand from audiences and listeners has increased dramatically, which in turn has given plenty of opportunities for new artists and professionals to show off their talent. One astute music artist and producer who made sure to create his own niche and name within the music industry was Massimo Anthony Didomenico.

Massimo Anthony Didomenico is an extremely talented young music producer who has been instrumental in delivering massive consecutive hits. It was his childhood dream to pursue music as a career and profession, in the future he embarked on his musical journey to reach great heights of success and set high benchmarks for many more to follow. . Coming from a modest family and going through many challenges early in his life, Massimo Anthony Didomenico had to fight to find his own place in the music industry.

By learning the art and craft of music creation and production, Massimo Anthony Didomenico learned industry tips and tricks to strengthen his overall music base, skills and expertise. Some of the colossal hits and songs like the songs that Massimo Anthony Didomenico produced include the names of Eyes, Crash, Beaches, Crack and Black. All of them have found a way to strike a chord in the hearts of the audience and propel them further to gain more love and popularity.

Massimo Anthony Didomenico now has a huge loyal fan base who are also eagerly awaiting his next release. For more details, follow him on Instagram @ massimoofficial1.


















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Hopes and dreams of Myanmar artists and musicians destroyed by coup https://alabamabluegrass.org/hopes-and-dreams-of-myanmar-artists-and-musicians-destroyed-by-coup/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 07:58:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/hopes-and-dreams-of-myanmar-artists-and-musicians-destroyed-by-coup/ Musicians take part in a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon on February 11, 2021. / AFP Through The Irrawaddy 20 December 2021 Before the coup shocked Myanmar, young artists and musicians were full of expectations and hope for 2021 after going through the first waves of the COVID-19 pandemic last year. But the […]]]>


Musicians take part in a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon on February 11, 2021. / AFP

Through The Irrawaddy 20 December 2021

Before the coup shocked Myanmar, young artists and musicians were full of expectations and hope for 2021 after going through the first waves of the COVID-19 pandemic last year.

But the coup turned all their dreams into nightmares, whether they were musicians or performers planning the return of live shows and exhibits after the country contained the coronavirus and the vaccination plan. national was in progress.

One of those musicians is Darko, singer of the local band Side Effect. His band had released a new single in January and they were planning to hold small gigs until the Burmese military coup on February 1 destroyed all of their plans.

“All my hopes for 2021 have vanished in the wake of the coup,” he told The Irrawaddy.

A demonstration against the coup of February 10. (Photo: The Irrawaddy)

Until the morning of the coup, which toppled the civilian party of the National League for Democracy (NLD) and saw State Councilor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and President U Win Myint detained, Darko said he thought 2020 was the worst year of his life, as the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted normal life and left him struggling with depression.

“I realized that 2020 was not the worst. Instead, I had the chance to learn what is the worst, ”he added.

Seeing the regime’s brutality and inhumane behavior towards civilians after the coup, Darko said he couldn’t find the words to express his feelings about these actions.

He couldn’t even listen to a song until recently because of these feelings, despite music being a central part of his life. And Darko has found it impossible to write and record new music over the past ten months, despite his plans for a busy and productive 2021.

Many other artists and musicians have had similar experiences seeing the coup and the junta deprive them of the freedom they have enjoyed in recent years.

Another of those affected is the street artist MS, who asked to use her nickname rather than her real name. Shortly after the coup, he joined the street protests against the military regime with his friends.

“Since the coup, I wake up every day with the heavy feeling that we are under military rule and a junta that has seized power illegitimately. With that feeling, I don’t want to do anything, ”MS said.

However, in order to make a living he had to start taking jobs. But the artist said he couldn’t enjoy doing public works of art now, like he did before the military takeover, because he has to be careful what he paints.

“We have lost our artistic freedom. If I create works of art against the military, they will definitely put me in jail, ”he added.

Although he no longer joins public protests due to the junta’s murderous crackdown, MS has found his own way to support the resistance movement against the regime.

He has helped create art to auction online to raise funds for resistance, as well as participate in online crowdfunding.

Darko also continued to aid the resistance movement, although he was forced to leave his home in March.

Side Effect singer and guitarist Darko performing the song ‘2019 Voices of the Youth’ in Yangon.

His house was raided by junta forces in March because he is friends with politicians like Phyo Zeya Thaw, a former NLD lawmaker and hip-hop musician.

The regime accused Phyo Zeya Thaw of being involved in one of the civil resistance units in Yangon that carries out attacks against junta targets. The former MP was arrested by regime forces during a raid on November 18.

“My house is always full of my friends. Before they raided my house, my family and I were already in a safe place because some of my friends had asked me to avoid being captured, ”Darko said.

He was sad when he left his house because it is full of memories of his life as a musician.

In recent years, the local music industry has opened up and started to reach new levels. The Burmese now accept all genres of music and some local musicians were collaborating with international artists.

But the coup destroyed everything, including the country’s vibrant and improving cultural scene, Darko said.

“We cannot accept this situation [military rule]. Many young people have taken up arms against the regime. I pity them because they sacrificed their future to take a stand against the regime. At the same time, I am so proud of them. And i feel guilty [about not joining them],” he said.

Street artist MS said some of his friends were on the run and others joined the People’s Defense Forces formed to defend civilians against the atrocities and violence of the junta.

“Low incomes, not being able to go out freely and the other problems we face on a daily basis cannot be compared to young people who sacrifice their lives and their future by resisting the military. They are really brave, but all I can do is support them, ”said MS.

He urged the Burmese people to continue to strongly support the resistance movement.

” They need us. I want to win this time, we have to win. So I want to ask everyone present, if you want to win this battle, please support them, ”MS added.

Artist MS created protest panels and joined a February demonstration in Yangon.


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Rosalie Trombley, who chose hits and made stars, dies at 82 https://alabamabluegrass.org/rosalie-trombley-who-chose-hits-and-made-stars-dies-at-82/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 14:50:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/rosalie-trombley-who-chose-hits-and-made-stars-dies-at-82/ Around 1968, Ms Trombley and her husband separated (they later divorced) and around the same time, she was offered the opportunity to take over from the station librarian, who was going on maternity leave. The station’s program director quickly took note of her ear for hits and appointed her musical director, a job she held, […]]]>

Around 1968, Ms Trombley and her husband separated (they later divorced) and around the same time, she was offered the opportunity to take over from the station librarian, who was going on maternity leave. The station’s program director quickly took note of her ear for hits and appointed her musical director, a job she held, Tim Trombley said, until she was fired in early 1980s in an effort to downsize.

Ms. Trombley didn’t just trust her own tastes; she called the area’s R&B stations to see what they were playing, which led her to give black artists a 50,000-watt CKLW exposure. It has also boosted the careers of Canadian artists like Gordon Lightfoot and The Guess Who, as well as a number of Detroit-area stars, including Bob Seger.

“Seger has never had any problem getting into CKLW,” she told the Detroit Free Press in 2004 when Mr. Seger was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. “Look at the songs. Listen to the lyrics. I’m a talkative freak. When someone says something in a song, I can’t be the only person who cares about it.

Well, Mr. Seger almost never had a problem getting up to the station. Some of her new songs came to her in the early 1970s, and she swept them away. He sat down and wrote a song about her called “Rosalie” – a tribute to her importance, but with a sly and disapproving undercurrent that they both laughed at later.

“He was pissed off when he wrote this song about me,” she said. “He told me!”

Payola – offering awards for having a song played – was part of the radio business during Ms Trombley’s reign, and her son said it was common knowledge in the industry that she was a single mother, so some promoters would subtly let him know that there was money available.

“She made it known in a less subtle way,” he said, “that if they wanted to continue meeting her every week, it wasn’t something that was going to get their radio record.”

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Redefining for 2022 https://alabamabluegrass.org/redefining-for-2022/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 23:25:43 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/redefining-for-2022/ When I was in bands in my late teens and early twenties, I had a very clear idea of ​​what success in the music business would look like. The idea was built around a 20th century “rock star” myth and what it took to make them successful. As the industry recovers from 20 years of […]]]>

When I was in bands in my late teens and early twenties, I had a very clear idea of ​​what success in the music business would look like. The idea was built around a 20th century “rock star” myth and what it took to make them successful.

As the industry recovers from 20 years of turmoil, it is time to address this idea of ​​success. So many of its facets no longer apply or have become toxic. With a new focus on wellness and mental health, with the decentralization of the business, with more opportunities and sources of income, now is the time to redesign the image of success and work towards something. generative, sustainable and healthy.

“We’re really going to get there, aren’t we?” I remember “Bird” the bass player from my old band Sprokit telling me as we played our new demo in my Nissan Pulsar. “I mean, the singer in my old band was like ‘when we do it …, when we do it …’ and I knew for real the band was going nowhere but WE are going to be huge. “. Like over-caffeinated rats in a lab maze, we propelled the moves we thought we had to embrace, into a pre-revolutionary internet music industry. Outside of practicing, recording some brash demos, and a few occasional gigs, we didn’t have a clear path to that concept of “Making It” that was in our heads.

We knew that “Making It” involved a “Big Break” and that there were only a handful of protests. Maybe it’s because a tour group we supported decided we were so amazing they wanted to take us on their next run and it was all going to take off from there. Or we sort of get listed on Triple J, either from a debut in a specialty program or by winning the Unearthed program (while on tour) and it would all take off from there. Or we would send a demo to a label and they would fall in love with us and it would all go from there.

The concept “it would all take off from there” was blind faith in the machinery of the music industry. The idea that once the machine is behind us an unstoppable momentum would be on our side. This blind faith was reassured by every success story we heard about. The story stated that a musical act was short lived, they would meet a caretaker who loved them, then “voila”, the act became a highlight. Machines weren’t a big part of this story. We knew he was there, we just didn’t know what he was doing. We knew even less about the heavy wooden shoe that was about to be wedged into the gears of this machine by our own generation and how it was going to make a permanent difference.

In 2001, peer to peer file sharing such as Napstar, Galaxy Audio & Lime Wire promised my generation all the music they ever wanted for free. Not only was it free, you didn’t have to go to a record store, you could just search and download it. You didn’t need to know you liked it, you could try out an album or song and if it sucked you could free up precious megabytes by deleting the file. Even as the industry struggled to maintain the scarcity and value of recorded music, the genius was out of the bottle and recorded music was about to become ubiquitous.

Fast forward twenty years and the music industry now appears to be in a sustained recovery and spared from total annihilation. The streaming model offers the same (or better) instant access as hacking, but with a payment system that consumers are happy to subscribe to. The steam along with other changes have resulted in steady revenue growth for our once struggling business. On top of all this, the price barriers to making a decent recording have collapsed. Without the need to physically print discs, the cost of music release basically evaporated, resulting in a huge increase in the amount of music released.

The result being that even though the money has returned to the industry, it has to be shared among many more musicians. The pie has a lot more slices. Additionally, the long tail of streaming revenue lends itself to extended and sustainable earnings rather than larger cash injections during active release cycles. These revenues can continue for many decades as long as the public continues to listen to your music.

So how does this affect the definition of success? Rather than a handful of musicians crossing the threshold of professionalism each year, a living wage from recorded music is more accessible than ever. Many of the processes (machines) kept by the gatekeepers of the past are now accessible to the public and at low cost. You can have an idea for a song, follow it and market it in a week. More importantly, it can be done with little capital expenditure and can be done over and over again.

Like any business, a freelance artist should aim to make money from their recordings, which means that process efficiency is paramount. You can of course try to go back to your long-awaited “Big Break”, but sustainability dictates that if your music is a constant drain on your income, your operating window is limited. I would also say that not only are the big breaks no longer necessary, but maybe just an archaic concept.

If an artist makes high quality / low cost recordings, the reality of the profitability of these projects comes much closer. If an artist can organize themselves to constantly make and release music, then these new benefits of profitability multiply. If they have a few projects in progress at a time, they can test ideas and keep track of the most successful projects. Income from successful projects can subsidize passion projects. If an artist connects with an audience, they will grow. If they feed their catalog, it will grow. This can train the artist in effective exit processes that will apply to any business.

If an artist spends their time making music they love, collaborating with talent they value, connecting with an audience, and generating a profit, then they are successful. It is nothing like the image of success I had when I was 19, but the world is a very different place.

Reprogramming 20 years of aspiration into something achievable in the modern age has been a challenge for me. But balancing a handful of projects, writing songs, producing, collaborating, and encouraging people to listen gives me a lot of joy and excitement. These motivating feelings have been the key to my continued involvement in (what can sometimes be) a brutal industry.

Redefining their image of success for the modern age can also free an artist from a lot of unfair self-criticism. When we try to compete with an image of success based on a 20th century rock star concept, we will of course be disappointed. It is clearly bad for our well-being. Creating a workflow that allows us to make music while still leaving room for social connection, exercise, mentoring and community engagement is, without a doubt, a mature and sustainable approach. If we can also find a way to do it affordably (or even profitably), then we’ve opened the final door to a career as a musician.

We need to love what we do rather than just love a dream of who we think we can be. If you like the idea of ​​yourself as a famous musician but find releasing music stressful, unaffordable, and overwhelming, then it will be very difficult to do the work you have to do to become a professional and it will be very difficult to do the work you have to do to become a professional. it will be very unlikely that you will be able to meet your precise aspirations.

Would I still wish Watermelon Boy had a massive hit streak? Yes sure, but it’s not the only model of success now and I’m happy to make and release the music that is close to my heart. My desire to live fast and die young faded as balance and sustainability became more important values. If I could explain this “long term” view of success to young musicians, it would involve dispelling the myth of the 20th century rock star and helping them build generative role models that will enable them to invest in a fulfilling career and to support them and their families for decades.


Arlo Enemark has spent over 11 years working in the music industry, from label and artist management to distribution and public relations. A longtime music producer, he released the debut album of his current project Watermelon Boy in November.

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