Music news – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 10:23:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://alabamabluegrass.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music news – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ 32 32 Local musicians write songs on charcoal to show support for miners https://alabamabluegrass.org/local-musicians-write-songs-on-charcoal-to-show-support-for-miners/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/local-musicians-write-songs-on-charcoal-to-show-support-for-miners/#respond Mon, 13 Sep 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/local-musicians-write-songs-on-charcoal-to-show-support-for-miners/ To say that Kentucky has a complicated relationship with coal is to take it lightly. Generations of miners have worked to power the nation despite dangerous working conditions and long term health effects like Black Lung. Although the economic power of coal in Kentucky has diminished, mines still impact millions of people. In addition to […]]]>

To say that Kentucky has a complicated relationship with coal is to take it lightly.

Generations of miners have worked to power the nation despite dangerous working conditions and long term health effects like Black Lung.

Although the economic power of coal in Kentucky has diminished, mines still impact millions of people. In addition to miners, local communities face contamination of the water supply. The Appalachians themselves have been forever changed by the removal of mountain tops.

The lingering effects of charcoal are motivating a new generation of Appalachian musicians. Inspired by heroism, sacrifice, neglect and greed as well as musicians like the late John Prine, they emerge with their own stories to sing along to the coal.

“’Dark Black Coal’ was written with the idea of ​​never wanting my kids to have to risk their lives for a paycheck,” said Logan Halstead, whose viral song chronicles the experience of extracting the charcoal of his grandfather, his father and his uncle.

Other Appalachian artists like Eric Bolander, Cole Chaney, and the Local Honeys grapple with conflicting feelings about coal. Recently, they have found musical expression as the best way to raise awareness and inspire change.

Eric Bolander: “Cold men”

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Eric Bolander wrote the song “Cold Men” after the Blackjewel bankruptcy. Photo provided

Even though his family didn’t work in the mines, singer-songwriter Eric Bolander couldn’t help but turn to music to voice his opinion on Blackjewel LLC’s brutal bankruptcy filing in 2019. The West Virginia-based company has left Appalachian miners without their last paycheck and countless abandoned mines without proper restoration. History made national news when the miners of Harlan Co. formed a blockade outside the mine they once worked, preventing the coal trains from leaving.

The idea to write a song came after Bolander performed a performance for unemployed miners at the Bell Theater in Pineville. “Cold Men” takes the point of view of a little girl whose father worked for the mine and was suddenly fired with no way to support her family. The song was released on February 5, 2021.

“I was moved by the plight of these workers and the courage it took to stand up for yourself and others,” said Bolander, a native of Lewis County. “I felt as a songwriter from a small town in Kentucky that I had to write a song that reflected that moment in history. These people have been wronged and deserve songs and stories written about them to help those in the future have enough courage to stand up for what is right.

Bolander hopes the song will help encourage others to stand up for what is right, stand firm in their beliefs, and support those who seek to have their voices heard.

“Coal has been a very important industry for our country and the Appalachian region for many years and I have tremendous respect for those who have worked and still work in the mines,” Bolander said. “But, there has been a lot of destruction and heartache associated with the industry which has unfortunately caused damage to some of the areas where these mines exist. Black lung and polluted water did not happen by accident and we should always be aware of bad conditions and bad business practices so that as we move forward, whatever the future of energy, we avoided making the same mistakes.

Cole Chaney: “coal shooter”

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Cole Chaney’s “Coleshooter” is based on his grandfather’s work as a 16-year-old miner. Photo provided

One of the youngsters (but not the youngest) who have appeared on the Kentucky music scene in recent months is Boyd County-born artist Cole Chaney. The 21-year-old comes from a family closely linked to the coal mines of eastern Kentucky which he integrates strongly into his music.

“Coalshooter”, from his recent debut album “Mercy” tells the story of his second generation Irish immigrant grandfather who was pushed to work in the mines as a coal shooter when he was only 16 years old. years to support his family.

“My grandfather grew up in the mines and saw people die and be maimed by stones, but he always talks about work as something to be revered,” Chaney said. “Despite the harsh working conditions and mistreatment from the coal companies, most workers were just doing what they had to do to provide for their families. That is why I have no respect for the coal companies, but all respect for the miners themselves.

One of the most dangerous jobs in mining, charcoal burners were limited to 18 or older at the time, which Chaney’s grandfather was able to bypass because his father also worked at the same mine. The work involved countless young and nimble workers who had to rush into the caves to light up the fuses to set off the dynamite that would open new parts of the mine. The high-stakes work resulted in many coal shooters being seriously injured or killed by falling rocks, mis-timed fuses, and accidentally triggering detonators while biting to activate them.

Although the job was dangerous, Chaney’s grandfather escaped relatively unscathed despite nearly three decades of underground work. Now 74, he continues to be a great inspiration to Chaney and cries regularly when he hears “Coalshooter” played.

“There are generations that came before us that are way tougher than we can imagine and didn’t have much choice in what they did other than being purely survival instinct,” said Chaney. . “You had to do what was best for the greater good of your family. It’s really not much different from a 17 year old who is shipped to Normandy. You face death in the face every day, sacrificing your body and your future in order to bring your family out of dire straits.

Logan Halstead: “Dark Black Coal”

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Logan Halstead enjoyed viral success with his song “Dark Black Coal”. Jonathan newsome

Another newcomer to the scene is West Virginia-based 17-year-old artist Logan Halstead, who only started performing live in March after a video for his song “Dark Black Coal” was released. went viral at the end of last year.

Based in Charleston, Halstead is well versed in charcoal farming. His grandfather, father and uncle all worked in the mines at one point and Halstead recounts his family’s experiences on ‘Dark Black Coal’, describing a rough blue collar life that he hopes others will. savings. He sings: “Dark black coal / Take my soul / I owe it to you anyway / Don’t leave my children / Become the victims / Evil mountain ways.”

While Halstead hopes for a better and more prosperous future for the Appalachians on “Dark Black Coal,” he also longs for more respect for those who have borne the burden of mining coal and keeping the lights on for the rest of the world. country for generations.

Despite the decline in mining, Halstead said he sees the scars in the mountains he used to roll on a daily basis flattened by surface mining and mountain top removal.

“I would like to think that the coal companies are trying to give back to our environment, but when I still have friends who live without clean water in 2021 because they live under a mine, it is difficult to give me back. hope, ”Halstead said.

Local Honeys

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The Local Honeys, Linda Jean Stokley, left, and Montana Hobbs have been talking openly about smut issues for years. Zacharie Martin

For years, the Local Honeys, centered around the duo of Montana Hobbs and Linda Jean Stokley, have spoken openly about environmental issues, the injustices of the coal companies and more in the Appalachians.

In 2017, the “Cigarette Trees,” written by Stokley, lamenting the misfortunes of mountain top removal, won top honors in the bluegrass category of the Chris Austin Songwriting Contest at the 30th Annual Merlefest in North Carolina. Now the group is recognized for two more songs, “Octavia Triangle” and “Dying To Make A Living”.

A stripped-down and ancient ballad, “Octavia Triangle” refers to a mine in Pike County. The song was taught to The Honeys by one of their greatest musical mentors, Jimmy McCown, in what is likely his last recording before he died in 2020. Originally written by McCown’s mother, the song tells the tragic story. of a love story gone wrong. the dark depths of the Octavia mine.

“This song means more to us than most and depicts a haunting scene of regret in the Kentucky coalfields,” The Local Honeys said in a Feb. 8 press release. “Jim left this world in a better place in 2020… We are honored to have had him as a friend, mentor and inspiration to share and teach the traditional music that makes us.”

The other song, “Dying To Make A Living,” came after the Honeys heard a traditional adaptation of the song at a festival in Letcher County a few years ago. Soon after, they began incorporating the song, modernized by WV Hill and AJ Mullins, into their shows. The decision to register it was boosted by the protests of the Blackjewel miners starting this summer.

“They literally mined the coal with their own hands,” Stokley said in a YouTube video posted Feb. 4, 2021. “This fuel is being used to power the whole world, so why not take better care of your people? You literally have people dying for a living and breaking their backs. “


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Lorde releases mini album in Maori language – Music News https://alabamabluegrass.org/lorde-releases-mini-album-in-maori-language-music-news/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/lorde-releases-mini-album-in-maori-language-music-news/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 10:36:49 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/lorde-releases-mini-album-in-maori-language-music-news/ Lorde has reissued part of his new album, Solar Power, in New Zealand’s native language. The EP, titled Te Ao Marama (translated as World of Light), features five songs sung in Te reo Maori, the language of the indigenous people of New Zealand. The 24-year-old released the surprise tracks during Te Wiki o Te Reo, […]]]>

Lorde has reissued part of his new album, Solar Power, in New Zealand’s native language.

The EP, titled Te Ao Marama (translated as World of Light), features five songs sung in Te reo Maori, the language of the indigenous people of New Zealand. The 24-year-old released the surprise tracks during Te Wiki o Te Reo, a week that celebrates the Maori language, and intends to donate all proceeds from the outing to Maori charities.

Although not fluent, Lorde realized while making the nature-themed album that much of it was inspired by her home country and came up with the idea to release songs in te reo maori. Determined to follow through on the idea, she told The Spinoff that she hired three Maori translators, who reworked some of the lyrics so that they made better sense in the language.

“I took each song line by line and really went into it,” she explained in the interview. “So Hana (Mereraiha) had a good grasp of where I was at and was then able to bring the translations to a more metaphorical place, or just summon a figure that she felt was relevant.” She also described meeting Sir Timoti Karetu, the 84-year-old former head of the Maori Language Commission, who is highly regarded for his work in preserving the language.

The singer, who is not Maori, admitted that some might disagree with her decision to record in the language. However, she explained that she would rather do it and be criticized than not do it at all.

“I’m white – however you want to interpret me as wanting to engage with our aboriginal culture, that’s fair enough. I totally accept that, because it’s really complicated, “she admitted.” It’s not something where I have both feet on the ground – I’m a little overwhelmed, and I’m the first to admit it, and I’m open to any response to that. “


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Metropolitan police looking for stolen trailer full of musical equipment | New https://alabamabluegrass.org/metropolitan-police-looking-for-stolen-trailer-full-of-musical-equipment-new/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/metropolitan-police-looking-for-stolen-trailer-full-of-musical-equipment-new/#respond Thu, 09 Sep 2021 10:26:08 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/metropolitan-police-looking-for-stolen-trailer-full-of-musical-equipment-new/ NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) – Metro police are looking for a stolen trailer carrying more than $ 100,000 in musical equipment. Nashville country music artist Adam Doleac was the victim of a burglary Tuesday morning in East Nashville. What was taken was all his equipment needed to put on shows. “It’s not a bunch of guitars […]]]>

NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) – Metro police are looking for a stolen trailer carrying more than $ 100,000 in musical equipment.

Nashville country music artist Adam Doleac was the victim of a burglary Tuesday morning in East Nashville. What was taken was all his equipment needed to put on shows.

“It’s not a bunch of guitars and stuff that you can bring straight to a pawnshop,” Doleac said. “These are $ 30,000 in-ear monitor racks and faceplate racks that play sound at our shows.”

Doleac shared a video of the theft with his followers on social media, and they were able to distinguish the trailer’s plate number as 196379T.

“We know the make and model of the vehicle that stole it, we know the VIN number of the plate numbers,” Doleac said. cash. ”

Thankfully, Doleac has said he doesn’t have a show this weekend, but will have to hire equipment for next weekend’s shows soon. Doleac is insured for all his equipment, he says it’s a short-term pain.

“Who knows if we get our things back, but if we can at least find this guy, he steals.” It looks like five to six trailers a week right now and unfortunately is doing it so far, ”Doleac said.

Doleac said he and his manager didn’t think it was a one-time incident. They believe that whoever is responsible for this crime has already committed it and could do it again.

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Titletown welcomes fall with new and returning activities https://alabamabluegrass.org/titletown-welcomes-fall-with-new-and-returning-activities/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/titletown-welcomes-fall-with-new-and-returning-activities/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 22:22:54 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/titletown-welcomes-fall-with-new-and-returning-activities/ With fall fast approaching, Titletown is poised to welcome community members and guests with several new activities to take advantage of the cooler temperatures and changing seasons. Starting this week, there will be daily fall activities and programs for all ages, with several different categories to enjoy: Get the apprenticeship presented by Imperial Supplies: With […]]]>

With fall fast approaching, Titletown is poised to welcome community members and guests with several new activities to take advantage of the cooler temperatures and changing seasons.

Starting this week, there will be daily fall activities and programs for all ages, with several different categories to enjoy:

  • Get the apprenticeship presented by Imperial Supplies: With something for everyone regardless of age, community members can develop their hobbies and skills in Titletown, from learning chess to exploring new global dance styles.
  • Get in shape: Enjoy comfortable temperatures with a variety of outdoor fitness classes to choose from, with free yoga, workout and zumba classes offered Mondays, Tuesdays and weekends, with the full schedule listed on titletown. com.
  • Be social: Meet new friends and have fun every day of the week by participating in Titletown’s interactive events, Acoustic Book Club and Lunch, a monthly playgroup for kids and adults. New this fall, Titletown is also making its debut Soul Sessions every Thursday evening from 5:30 am to 7:30 am until September, offering the mellow sounds of jazz and world music, located on the Grand Stairs at the west end of Titletown. The groups that occur are listed on https://www.titletown.com/events/calendar/soul-sessions.
  • To move: Community members can embrace many types of moves in Titletown, with tai chi, line dancing, and ballroom classes, as well as opportunities to show off their moves with line dancing and parties. weekly social services until September.
  • To show creativity: Opportunities for young and old to cultivate their creative side, with the Kids Art and STEAM Stop programs for the youngest and DIY + Cocktails for the adults offered on Thursdays.

Titletown will also bring back the favorite fall events: Mad Scientist’s Laboratory, with interactive and practical STEAM activities on Saturday, September 18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Pumpkin Palooza, the fall extravaganza with fall-themed activities and a free pumpkin carving for the whole family on Saturday, October 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Films in Titletown presented by Kemps will host its latest outdoor films this Friday September 10 and Saturday September 11. From Friday, September 17, Campfire Fridays will return for the fall through October 22, with weekly entertainment from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Community members can continue to visit Ariens Hill for Drinks with a view Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays in September, with free theme drinks.

The Titletown Kickball League presented by Miller Lite will also take place every Wednesday evening. Although registration is complete for the league, visitors should note that spectators are welcome and that the football field will be closed to other activities starting Wednesdays at 5 p.m.

To learn more about what’s in store at Titletown for the coming months, please visit titletown.com/events/calendar.

Every game day at home, Titletown Gameday Live presented by Pella Windows and Doors of Wisconsin will also be back for the football season this fall, with live music and entertainment on two different stages, as well as food and drink to buy, starting four hours before kick-off. A schedule of performing bands and DJs listed on titletown.com/events/calendar/titletown-gameday-live.

Up-to-date information on activities and programming is also shared via Titletown’s social media platforms at facebook.com/TitletownGB*, * twitter.com/titletown and instagram.com/titletown. Titletown also includes TitletownTech, The Turn, Bellin Health Titletown Sports Medicine & Orthopedics, Lodge Kohler, Hinterland Restaurant and Brewery, and Associated Bank. For more information visit titletown.com.



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Injury Reserve announces homecoming show in December, plus other music news from Phoenix https://alabamabluegrass.org/injury-reserve-announces-homecoming-show-in-december-plus-other-music-news-from-phoenix/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/injury-reserve-announces-homecoming-show-in-december-plus-other-music-news-from-phoenix/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/injury-reserve-announces-homecoming-show-in-december-plus-other-music-news-from-phoenix/ Click to enlarge Richie With AT (left) and Parker Corey (right) of Injury Reserve. Here’s a midweek recap of the latest music news from the metropolitan Phoenix scene, including details on local hip-hop group Injury Reserve returning to town in December, details on the Crescent Ballroom 10th anniversary festivities next month and The Maine revealing […]]]>

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Richie With AT (left) and Parker Corey (right) of Injury Reserve.

Here’s a midweek recap of the latest music news from the metropolitan Phoenix scene, including details on local hip-hop group Injury Reserve returning to town in December, details on the Crescent Ballroom 10th anniversary festivities next month and The Maine revealing lineup for their 8123 Fest in January.

Injury Reserve announces reunion show for December

Local fans of Injury Reserve are feasting for the holidays as the local hip-hop group returns to the valley in late December. The Tempe-born duo of rapper Ritchie With a T and producer Parker Corey have announced their fall tour dates, which will include a performance at the Van Buren on Wednesday, December 29. Tickets are $ 22 to $ 25.

Fittingly, the tour and local performance will support their new album, By the time I get to Phoenix, which comes out next week. This is the first music from Injury Reserve since the death of founding member Stepa J. Groggs in June 2020. The album was reportedly recorded before the rapper’s death and will feature his contributions.

Tempe EDM Boutique The Flow Shop becomes Rave Circus

Tempe Shop Adapted to EDM The Flow Shop has a new name: Rave Circus. The store, which is tucked away in Mill Avenue stores near Fourth and Mill avenues, recently announced the news on its Facebook page, saying it wanted a “brand that more accurately represents our customers.” As any kandi kid in their fan base will tell you, the place sells a variety of rave props like hoops, juggling props, light up toys, and string poi.

Click to enlarge Crescent Ballroom has planned a big 10th anniversary.  - FACEBOOK OF THE CRESCENT BALLROOM

Crescent Ballroom has planned a big 10th anniversary.

Crescent Ballroom announces plans for its 10th anniversary

The Crescent Ballroom in downtown Phoenix turns 10 next month, and its owners are planning a three-night celebration filled with DJs, bands and musicians in honor of the occasion. The evenings kick off on Friday October 1 with a region-focused show featuring the Phoenix Afrobeat Orchestra, Black Carl, The Stakes and Djentrification. Indie bands Shannon and the Clams, Wavves and Strange Lot will perform the following evening, Saturday October 2, with sets from Jazzmaster Jax and Nitro DJs. Soul singer Lee Fields and his band The Expressions will wrap things up on Sunday, October 3. Samara Cyn, Orkestra Mendoza from Tucson and DJ Johnny D share the bill. Ticket prices vary for each show. More information is available here.

Maine’s lineup unveils 8123 Fest

Talking about both the big birthdays and the local bands that made it big, pop-rock group The Maine announced who else will be performing at their 8123 Fest in January. The multi-day event, which celebrates the band’s 15th anniversary, will consist of multiple concerts taking place Jan. 21-24 at various venues in downtown Phoenix. Artists and bands The Summer Set, 3OH! 3, Tessa Violet, Derek Sanders from Mayday Parade, Beach Weather and John the Ghost are all scheduled to perform the event. This is the first time the festival has taken place since 2019. Tickets are on sale now via the 8123 Fest website.

Click to enlarge Costumed participants of the Talking Stick Wicked Ball in 2019. - BENJAMIN LEATHERMAN

Costumed participants at Talking Stick’s Wicked Ball 2019.

Benjamin leatherman

Talking Stick Resort announces wicked Halloween ball

As all of the candy, decorations, and costumes on sale at your nearest drugstore indicate, All Hallows Eve is just around the corner. As such, local sites and promoters have started revealing plans for their Halloween parties. This includes the Talking Stick Resort in Scottsdale, which has announced the return of its annual Wicked Ball. This year’s edition of the popular costume party will take place on Saturday, October 30 at the resort’s Salt River Ballroom and feature performances by electronic dance music DJs / producers Hook N Sling, Gattuso and Matoma. General admission is $ 50 and VIP tickets are $ 90.


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Gospel Fans Come From All Over To See Jeff And Sheri Easter Perform In Clarksburg, West Virginia | New https://alabamabluegrass.org/gospel-fans-come-from-all-over-to-see-jeff-and-sheri-easter-perform-in-clarksburg-west-virginia-new/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/gospel-fans-come-from-all-over-to-see-jeff-and-sheri-easter-perform-in-clarksburg-west-virginia-new/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 00:45:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/gospel-fans-come-from-all-over-to-see-jeff-and-sheri-easter-perform-in-clarksburg-west-virginia-new/ CLARKSBURG, Va. (WV News) – More than 200 gospel music fans listened and cheered for the Easter family on stage at the Robinson Grand Performing Arts Center on Sunday. “It’s good to be in West Virginia,” said Jeff Easter after performing a few songs, thanking the audience for coming. Jeff and Sheri Easter begin their […]]]>

CLARKSBURG, Va. (WV News) – More than 200 gospel music fans listened and cheered for the Easter family on stage at the Robinson Grand Performing Arts Center on Sunday.

“It’s good to be in West Virginia,” said Jeff Easter after performing a few songs, thanking the audience for coming.

Jeff and Sheri Easter begin their concert Sunday at the Robinson Grand Performing Arts Center in Clarksburg.






Jeff and Sheri Easter have performed together or with different bands for decades. They played on Sunday with some of their family.

The show was originally booked by AMT Productions for the 2020 schedule, but has been postponed due to COVID-19.

“The last time we had them was in 2018. We had to rotate every two years, and 2020 was supposed to be that year,” said Herbert Aaron Baker, director of AMT Productions. “We are grateful that we can now continue even with all the uncertainty.”

Baker called the group “very family oriented” as well as “fabulous.”

Jennifer Bradmon and her husband Eugene agree. The couple traveled from Uniontown, PA to sit in the front row.

“We’re friends with Jeff and Sheri, so whenever we can see them we make a point of going to see them,” said Jennifer Bradmon. “They are the most down to earth people – they are the most humble, generous and kind people I have ever met. I am grateful that I can call them friends.”

She said the couple met the musicians during an artist meetup in 2006 at the Gaither Family Fest in Gatlinburg, Tennessee and they often discuss upcoming performances.

The group will then perform as part of Music in the Mountains at Glenwood Park in Bluefield.

“We love Easter,” said Beverly Lowe, of Jarvisville. “I have my tickets since January 2020.”

Lowe and her husband Chip saw the band perform at Jewel City Church in Meadowbrook more than a decade before the church moved to its current location.

Susan Travers of Sistersville attended the performance with Garrytt Horner, senior from St. Mary’s High School. Travers is a guidance counselor at St. Mary’s High School and Horner is one of her students and the tennis team she coaches.

“He asked me to bring him to this concert, so I bought the tickets in January. He was looking forward to this concert,” Travers said. “He loves Southern Gospel music.”

“I’ve always loved watching (Jeff and Sheri Easter),” said Horner, a St. Mary’s resident.

A former Doddridge County resident, Travers visited the Robinson Grand Performing Arts Center several times, but the last time she saw country musician Mary Chapin Carpenter perform was in the 1980s.

Rex of Sistersville and Arretta Kisner were the first to walk through the doors. While it was their first time at Clarksburg or the Robinson Grand Performing Arts Center, they saw the band perform when AMT Production’s concerts were at East Fairmont High School.

“We have tickets for all the shows for the rest of this year,” Rex Kisner said. “I love music.”

AMT Productions will host the Nelons at 3:30 p.m. on September 12.


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Star-studded comeback concert in Central Park is silenced by lightning https://alabamabluegrass.org/star-studded-comeback-concert-in-central-park-is-silenced-by-lightning/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/star-studded-comeback-concert-in-central-park-is-silenced-by-lightning/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 14:50:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/star-studded-comeback-concert-in-central-park-is-silenced-by-lightning/ It was meant to be a glorious celebration of New York City’s re-emergence after more than a year of pandemic hardship – a concert bringing together thousands of vaccinated fans on Saturday night on the Great Lawn in Central Park to hear a star-studded lineup. . And for the first two hours it was, with […]]]>

It was meant to be a glorious celebration of New York City’s re-emergence after more than a year of pandemic hardship – a concert bringing together thousands of vaccinated fans on Saturday night on the Great Lawn in Central Park to hear a star-studded lineup. .

And for the first two hours it was, with messages about New York’s resilience sandwiched between performances from the New York Philharmonic, Jennifer Hudson, Carlos Santana, LL Cool J and Earth, Wind and Fire, among others.

But shortly after 7:30 p.m., while Barry Manilow was playing “Can’t Smile Without You”, lightning interrupted the concert. “Please seek shelter for your safety,” an announcer sang, turning off the music, as people started to walk out of the park.

The crowds were sent home and the concert was abruptly interrupted. Even with Hurricane Henri expected to make landfall in the region on Sunday, officials remained hopeful of resuming the show if the weather permitted, and CNN, which broadcast the concert, delayed the time. Many headliners, including Bruce Springsteen, Paul Simon, Patti Smith, Elvis Costello and Maluma, had yet to perform when he was cut short. But shortly before 10:30 p.m., the show was definitively canceled.

The concert had started with a ray of sun breaking through the clouds just before it started at 5 pm. Gayle King, host of “CBS This Morning,” started the evening by thanking the essential workers who had pulled the city through the darkest days. of the pandemic.

“We were once the epicenter of this virus, and now we have become the epicenter of the recovery,” she said. “We come together for a common purpose: to say, ‘Welcome to New York! “”

She presented the New York Philharmonic, which opened the concert with the opening of Leonard Bernstein’s “Candide”, conducted by Marin Alsop, a protégé of Bernstein. The orchestra then played a mix of New York-themed music, including tracks from “Rhapsody in Blue” by Gershwin, “New York State of Mind” by Billy Joel and “Theme From ‘New York, New York. ‘”, the anthem made famous by Frank Sinatra, among others.

The concert, “We Love NYC: The Homecoming Concert,” which aired live on CNN, was part of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plans to celebrate the city’s return from the pain and suffering of the pandemic.

When the concert was announced by Mr de Blasio in June, the drop in the number of coronavirus cases and the increase in vaccination figures had filled the city with hope.

But circumstances have changed dramatically over the past two months. The spread of the highly contagious Delta variant has led some businesses in the city to postpone the return to their offices, prompted the city to institute vaccination warrants for indoor dining and entertainment, and threatened to destabilize the city. concert activity in the broad sense.

On June 7, the day the concert was announced, the city had an average of 242 cases per day; the daily average is now over 2,000 cases per day.

With the Philharmonic still on stage, the concert continued with Andrea Bocelli, the Italian star tenor, singing “O Sole Mio” and Jennifer Hudson, the star of Aretha Franklin’s new biopic “Respect”, singing “Nessun Dorma” of Puccini – a beloved aria who teamed up with Franklin after performing her at the Grammy Awards in 1998.

As the crowds poured in, the thought of New York’s return – whether it was a two-fisted defeat by a viral foe or an untimely declaration of victory – was apparently on everyone’s minds.

“This is our reopening – this is our invitation to come back to real life,” said Dean Dunagan, 52, of the Lower East Side, who had come to see Mr. Springsteen and had been waiting outside the park for four. years and a half. hours before the doors open.

“New York has been punched in the face every ten years, or whatever,” Mr. Dunagan said, “and we’re getting up right away.”

A few feet from him was Alexandra Gudaitis, a 24-year-old Paul Simon fan from the Upper West Side. “I’m afraid this is a mass spreading event, with the Delta,” she said.

Still, she was one of the first fans to walk through the door and rushed past the general admission section with a few friends. They were wearing masks and Ms Gudaitis said they chose their location because it appeared to have better access to fresh air.

Some of the acts had only tenuous ties to New York. But rap pioneer LL Cool J led a New York ode to old-school hip-hop with Busta Rhymes, A Boogie Wit da Hoodie, French Montana, Melle Mel and Rev. Run of Run-DMC.

The Coming Home Show required anyone aged 12 and over to provide proof that they had received at least one dose of a vaccine; children younger than that, who are still not eligible for vaccines, had to wear masks.

“When it comes to concerts, they are outside, they are reserved for vaccinated people,” the mayor said on Wednesday. “We definitely encourage the use of the mask. But I really want to stress that the whole key here is vaccination. “

The Central Park show came after the city hosted a week of free hip-hop shows, featuring local heroes including Raekwon and Ghostface Killah in Staten Island, and KRS-One, Kool Moe Dee and Slick Rick in the Bronx. . Tickets were required to attend the concert on the Great Lawn – most were free, but VIP packages cost up to $ 5,000 – and the show was broadcast on CNN television and satellite radio on SiriusXM.

The concert was programmed by Clive Davis, the 89-year-old musical eminence, who, in an interview this week, highlighted the role music can play in shaping society.

“It is vital and important that New York is back,” he said.

Mr Davis, who joined Columbia Records as a lawyer in 1960 – with no relevant background in music – and rose through the ranks to become its president before arranging successful returns for label stars Arista and J , said he was contacted by Mr de Blasio in May about the show’s set-up. His first call was for Mr. Springsteen.

“I picked up the phone and told him we were going to celebrate New York,” recalls Davis. “He said he would introduce himself and he wanted to do a duet.” (The planned duet was with Patti Smith on “Because the Night,” a 1978 song they wrote together.)

From the scene on Saturday night, Mr Davis, from Brooklyn, appealed to the audience, “Tonight I only ask one thing: When you’re having fun, cheer him on hard – hard enough that he can hear you. to Crown Heights in Brooklyn.

The abridged concert came at an uncertain time for the music industry. While some top performers including Garth Brooks, BTS and Nine Inch Nails recently canceled tour dates, the show is largely set in the live music business – but it hasn’t been easy. Concert protocols, in New York and elsewhere, have been evolving for months, as federal authorities, local governments and businesses have adapted to the changing realities of the virus.

Broadway requires masks and proof of vaccination when its theaters reopen, and Los Angeles County recently announced that it will require masks at large outdoor events such as baseball games at Dodger Stadium and the concerts at the Hollywood Bowl.

Mr de Blasio defended the continuation of the concert, noting that it was held outside and for those vaccinated, although some other events were canceled. For example, this year’s American Caribbean Day parade in Brooklyn, scheduled for Labor Day weekend, has been canceled.

The eyes of the concert industry have been on Chicago, where the Lollapalooza festival drew 400,000 people over four days in late July and early August, fearing it could turn into a “superspreader” event. The festival, which was held outdoors, required participants to present proof of vaccination or a negative test. Last week, the city said 203 people attending the show subsequently tested positive and no hospitalizations or deaths were reported.


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Student Musicians Star at Annual Camerata Club Scholarship Event | New https://alabamabluegrass.org/student-musicians-star-at-annual-camerata-club-scholarship-event-new/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/student-musicians-star-at-annual-camerata-club-scholarship-event-new/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/student-musicians-star-at-annual-camerata-club-scholarship-event-new/ Since the 1990s, the Yakima Male Choir known as the Camerata Club has awarded annual scholarships to talented young musicians from the Yakima Valley. This year was no exception. On June 1, the group hosted 14 young musicians at Wesley United Methodist Church to showcase their musical abilities. Grade 11 and 12 musicians from Yakima […]]]>

Since the 1990s, the Yakima Male Choir known as the Camerata Club has awarded annual scholarships to talented young musicians from the Yakima Valley. This year was no exception.

On June 1, the group hosted 14 young musicians at Wesley United Methodist Church to showcase their musical abilities. Grade 11 and 12 musicians from Yakima Valley are invited to participate in the event, and this year’s contestants included pianists, singers and an oboist.

The top eight musicians received scholarships ranging from $ 500 to $ 1,625 from the Sundquist Fund, the Junior League and the Yakima Retired Teachers Association.

COVID-19 made this year’s contest unique, featuring social distancing and masks.

This year’s judges included local musicians Scott Peterson, Lynda Wall and Susan Hotchko. After long discussions, the judges announced a tie between two extraordinary pianists. First place went to Kayla Kwon for her performance of Greig and Ethan Kim’s “Prelude to the Holberg Suite”, performing “Fantasie Impromptu Op. 66.”

As a former Camerata Fellowship recipient, I remember the event as more than just a competition. It allows young musicians to come together, see familiar faces and share the results of their practice. Competitions are an opportunity to learn to adapt to an unfamiliar piano, calm racing nerves and find calm through mistakes and sweaty hands. It can be scary at the time, but these moments make performances like the Camerata scholarship particularly rewarding.

To view a video summary of this year’s performances, visit the Scholarships page of the Yakima Camerata Club website at www.yakimacamerataclub.org.

And keep an eye out for next spring for the 2022 Camerata High School Music Scholarship.


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Jason Isbell announces COVID rules | The music https://alabamabluegrass.org/jason-isbell-announces-covid-rules-the-music/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/jason-isbell-announces-covid-rules-the-music/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 11:35:01 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/jason-isbell-announces-covid-rules-the-music/ Jason Isbell is demanding that all viewers of his show be vaccinated against COVID-19. The 42-year-old singer threatened to withdraw from a concert where the venue received both coronavirus injections or failed to ask fans to prove that he had recently had negative consequences. “To attend all the shows, indoors and outdoors, you need an […]]]>

Jason Isbell is demanding that all viewers of his show be vaccinated against COVID-19.

The 42-year-old singer threatened to withdraw from a concert where the venue received both coronavirus injections or failed to ask fans to prove that he had recently had negative consequences.

“To attend all the shows, indoors and outdoors, you need an up-to-date vaccination record or negative test. If you don’t allow it on the site, you won’t play, ”Jason said on his Twitter account. I am.

Jason isn’t the only artist making rules regarding the coronavirus, as the Foo Fighters had a similar protocol for their concerts.

They asked concert goers to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19, with the last dose being received at least 14 days before the show. Children under 16 were allowed to test negative for coronavirus instead.

However, despite their strict rules, the group was forced to postpone the show last month after a member of their “organization” tested positive.

The Foo Fighters said in a statement at the time: “There are cases of Covid-19 identified within the Foo Fighters organization, despite all efforts to comply with the CDC Covid protocol and local law. .

“Saturday’s show at the Los Angeles Forum has been postponed to a later date due to the attention and concern for the safety of the group, the team and nearly all of the fans.

“The new date will be announced shortly. Tickets for July 17 will be honored on the new date.

The show was set to be the first full capacity concert in 18,000 venues since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

Jason Isbell announces COVID rules | The music

Source Link Jason Isbell Announces COVID Rules | The music


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Lakes Area Music Festival in Brainerd cancels season due to COVID https://alabamabluegrass.org/lakes-area-music-festival-in-brainerd-cancels-season-due-to-covid/ https://alabamabluegrass.org/lakes-area-music-festival-in-brainerd-cancels-season-due-to-covid/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 12:09:59 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/lakes-area-music-festival-in-brainerd-cancels-season-due-to-covid/ This article originally appeared on MPR’s YourClassical.org. By Randy Salas The Lakes Area Music Festival, which returned this summer to Brainerd, Minn., With live performances, canceled its season and all related activities after two performers tested positive for COVID-19. The concerts were to take place until August 22. “Last week our season started with optimism […]]]>

This article originally appeared on MPR’s YourClassical.org.

By Randy Salas

The Lakes Area Music Festival, which returned this summer to Brainerd, Minn., With live performances, canceled its season and all related activities after two performers tested positive for COVID-19. The concerts were to take place until August 22.

“Last week our season started with optimism and enthusiasm,” said artistic director Scott Lykins in an email sent late Friday night. “We were confident in our return to live performances, knowing that all of our performers are vaccinated and that 98% of ticket holders reported being vaccinated. …

“Unfortunately, two of our artists have tested positive for COVID. Therefore, it is with deep regret and with the safety of our LAMF community in mind that we must cancel all remaining activities for our 2021 season. ”

This season marked the start of a new concert hall, the Gichi-ziibi Center for the Arts in downtown Brainerd, and the festival’s first musical director, German conductor Christian Reif. He had directed the final performances of the festival in 2016, 2017 and 2018 and was scheduled this season to conduct six orchestral programs and a production of “The Rake’s Progress” by Igor Stravinsky.

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