Music organization – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 01:50:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://alabamabluegrass.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music organization – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ 32 32 OneBeat 11 & 12 – Applications open until September 02! https://alabamabluegrass.org/onebeat-11-12-applications-open-until-september-02/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 01:50:46 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/onebeat-11-12-applications-open-until-september-02/ OneBeat is accepting applications for two months of U.S.-based music exchanges scheduled for Spring and Fall 2023. OneBeat 11 (April-May) and OneBeat 12 (September-October) will bring together 50 musicians (ages 19-35 years) from certain countries to write, produce and perform original music in collaboration and to develop strategies for social engagement based on the arts. […]]]>

OneBeat is accepting applications for two months of U.S.-based music exchanges scheduled for Spring and Fall 2023. OneBeat 11 (April-May) and OneBeat 12 (September-October) will bring together 50 musicians (ages 19-35 years) from certain countries to write, produce and perform original music in collaboration and to develop strategies for social engagement based on the arts. Each session begins with a residency followed by a tour. OneBeat Fellows will perform for a wide range of US audiences, collaborate with local musicians, and lead workshops with young people. After the program, OneBeat musicians return to their home countries and communities to develop mutually-reinforcing music-focused social enterprise network projects.

OneBeat is an initiative of the United States Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs in collaboration with groundbreaking New York-based music organization Band on a Can’s Found Sound Nation, celebrating its 10e anniversary, OneBeat is redefining music diplomacy through a series of programs using collaborative music-making as civic discourse, Young musicians (ages 19-35) from around the world explore how artists, communities and institutions can work together to rejuvenating local economies through music, technology and the creative arts. OneBeat is a global community of tastemakers who combine their artistic processes with improving their communities.

We are looking for candidates who excel in the following areas:

Musical/artistic genre: folk music, hip hop, electro music, jazz, experimental music, classical music, sound art installation, DJ, audio engineering and others (including singing and dancing).

Age: Applicants must be between the ages of 19 and 35 on the program dates.

English proficiency: applicants must be able to converse and understand basic English, as this will be the common language of the OneBeat Virtual program.

Musical excellence and innovation: A high level of performance, composition, improvisation, production and/or technological competence.

Social engagement: Musicians who have used music in the service of their communities or larger societies. This may include guiding young people through music education, addressing socio-political issues, reviving dying musical traditions, etc.

Collaboration: Willingness of candidates to overcome cultural and musical divides by creating original music or reinterpreting traditional music, while respecting the essence of each tradition.

Registration deadline: apply via the online application system at apply.1beat.org before September 02, 2022 (5:00 p.m.)

Application results: the program office will notify applicants of their selection by the end of January 2023.

Eligible Countries:

Albania, Algeria, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Cambodia, China, Colombia, Cuba, Democratic Republic of Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Malaysia, Mexico, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestinian Territories, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United States, Uzbekistan, Venezuela

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Middletown Grange Fair is back for its 72nd year in Wrightstown https://alabamabluegrass.org/middletown-grange-fair-is-back-for-its-72nd-year-in-wrightstown/ Tue, 16 Aug 2022 01:59:18 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/middletown-grange-fair-is-back-for-its-72nd-year-in-wrightstown/ With the end of summer in sight, what better way to spend one last night then outside with animals, families, live music and the smell of freshly popped popcorn. The Middletown Grange is hosting its 72nd annual fair, a Bucks County tradition that dates back to 1948, from August 17 to August 21 this year. […]]]>
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Gerds/Review: The classical music scene on the mend | WFRV Local 5 https://alabamabluegrass.org/gerds-review-the-classical-music-scene-on-the-mend-wfrv-local-5/ Sun, 14 Aug 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/gerds-review-the-classical-music-scene-on-the-mend-wfrv-local-5/ GREEN BAY, Wis. (WFRV) – Northeastern Wisconsin’s classical music scene has taken a hit from the COVID-19 pandemic. But the music makers didn’t leave. Here’s a look at how some groups are coming back: Expert musicians from across America continue to perform at the peninsula’s first music festival in three seasons. Three of the festival’s […]]]>

GREEN BAY, Wis. (WFRV) – Northeastern Wisconsin’s classical music scene has taken a hit from the COVID-19 pandemic.

But the music makers didn’t leave.

Here’s a look at how some groups are coming back:

Expert musicians from across America continue to perform at the peninsula’s first music festival in three seasons. Three of the festival’s nine concerts remain at the Door Community Auditorium in Fish Creek this week.

The organization is looking for a successor to its beloved conductor and musical director Victor Yampolsky, whose title is now Laureate Conductor.

For small ensemble classics, the group called Midsummer’s Music offers dozens of concerts throughout the summer.

After the Peninsula Music Festival wraps up, The Midsummer’s Music season will continue at newer venues like the Carol and Donald Kress Pavilion in Egg Harbor.

As fall approaches, the Sheboygan Symphony Orchestra will have a new conductor/music director, Ernesto Estigarribia, chosen from a pool of 107 applicants from 14 countries.

As the orchestra enters its 104th season, it will also have a new executive director. Joshua Hernday arrives after leading the Green Lake Music Festival and concert stage.

Door County’s own Griffon String Quartet/Brown County will begin their concert season next month in many locations.

The Brown County Civic Music Association expects its first uninterrupted season in a few years, with three of its performances at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts in Green Bay.

The Weidner Philharmonic at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will have a slightly bigger presence in the center, starting September 24 with “Women’s Work” featuring compositions by women.

The American Czech and Slovak International Voice Competition – the region’s one and only international voice competition – after a postponement, returns in October for three days at the UWGB’s Fort Howard Hall at the Weidner Center.

Organizers Sarah Meredith Livingston and Sharon Resch invite talented singers from North America and abroad.

Conductor/Music Director Seong-Kyung Graham of the Civic Symphony of Green Bay has planned a huge day for November 19 – “Gridiron Gala with the Symphony” – with multiple events and a concert at Lambeau Field Atrium.

On the program for the Fox Valley Symphony Orchestra season, two world premieres, including one composed by John Henneken of the faculty of St. Norbert College in De Pere.

Developments about these and other items will continue to be part of my columns on this site.

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NJ State Fair offers sensory day for children with autism https://alabamabluegrass.org/nj-state-fair-offers-sensory-day-for-children-with-autism/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 19:07:48 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/nj-state-fair-offers-sensory-day-for-children-with-autism/ FRANKFORD — The New Jersey State Fair carnival area normally flashes with bright lights and blares with upbeat music. For two hours on Thursday, it was strangely subdued. The rides were still clattering. But throughout the morning, another noise became more frequent: the delighted howls of the runners, taking advantage of an environment usually uncomfortable […]]]>
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NERVO Tackles Child Trafficking With Future Rave Banger – Billboard https://alabamabluegrass.org/nervo-tackles-child-trafficking-with-future-rave-banger-billboard/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 18:23:04 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/nervo-tackles-child-trafficking-with-future-rave-banger-billboard/ They may not have realized it at the time, but the Tomorrowland 2022 crowd was taught a lesson in the grim realities of child trafficking, as they raved. This transmission happened during a trio of sets by NERVO, who during each episode of the three-weekend Belgian mega-festival played a new song with lyrics asking: “Did […]]]>

They may not have realized it at the time, but the Tomorrowland 2022 crowd was taught a lesson in the grim realities of child trafficking, as they raved.

This transmission happened during a trio of sets by NERVO, who during each episode of the three-weekend Belgian mega-festival played a new song with lyrics asking: “Did you know she didn’t doesn’t always have a choice / Did you know that he doesn’t ‘ you don’t always have a voice?

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“If you look around, things might not appear as they seem,” the female voice continues during a moody future rave production. “If your eyes are open, you can help free her.”

NERVO hopes this track will inspire that exact effect. The song, which is yet to be named, was produced to raise awareness about child/family separation and child trafficking, with NERVO’s latest performance at Tomorrowland on July 30 coinciding with the United Nations World Day Against trafficking in persons, a global opportunity to raise awareness. On the question. (Listen to an exclusive preview of this song below.)

The track is the centerpiece of a campaign on which the Australian duo – twins Liv and Mim Nervo – are collaborating with Hopeland, a UK-based organization that works to stop children being separated from their families. and to help prevent children who have had such experiences. separation from trafficking. The UN notes that one in three trafficking victims detected is a child.

For NERVO, the partnership is literally a family affair, with Liv’s three-year-old daughter, Ace Paloma, featured on the song, announcing in a small but mighty voice that “Together we can help!” make known.”

“She wasn’t even three at the time,” Liv says, speaking to Billboard on Zoom from Ibiza,” and she was a little scared of the mic at first. But she styled it.

According to Hopeland’s 2021 annual report, more than 25 million children worldwide are separated from their parents, including up to 9.4 million children who live in orphanages. Hopeland’s mission is to ensure that children have safe and loving families, saying that children separated from their families become more vulnerable to trafficking and that the huge amount of foreign funding that goes into orphanages encourages recruitment active of children in orphanages.

This devastating problem may seem far from the carefree confines of Raveland, but it’s one the Nervo sisters have been forced into for a very personal reason: their own children. Both Mim and Liv gave birth to daughters in 2019, with Mim having a second child. (Since becoming a mom, Liv has shared on social media how Ace Paloma’s father abandoned Liv and her daughter, with Liv discovering he was hiding another committed relationship in which he had two children.)

“I’m partly ashamed to admit that becoming a mother was the turning point,” says Liv. “There are a lot of people who have a stronger social conscience [than I did before], and I admire them a lot for that. But going through that personal journey and raising my daughter alone – there were abandonment issues I had with her father – made me look out into the world and see other children who have been abandoned by their parents and by the society. It inspired me to practice a lot of gratitude for my own situation and my own privilege, and to want to do something – like anything.

That something became Hopeland, the organization founded in 2014 by Nicholas Evans and Deborah-Lee Furness, wife of Hugh Jackman. After being introduced to Hopeland through manager David Guetta, NERVO bonded with Evans, and together they thought about how they could get involved. Eventually, the group decided that the most effective path would simply be for the sisters to do what they do best: make music.

Thus, the spark for the song was created, with Hopeland and NERVO collaborating closely on the lyrics, which nod to the issue without being entirely overt. (“Is someone looking for me?” asks Ace Paloma in his feature.) The song marks Hopeland’s second high-profile musical collaboration, following the 2019 release of Coldplay’s “Orphans,” which focused on the global refugee crisis.

“This project with NERVO was particularly special, as we explored how to communicate on such an important issue,” says Evans. “How do you give people something to do with it? That’s what we’ve done with the NERVO team – creating lots of content so we can direct people to a site to learn more about the issue and understand how they can support different organizations tackling it.

Part of the strategy behind this campaign is its length, with the song’s debut in July at Tomorrowland marking the public launch of a partnership that will continue with information sharing on social platforms and, eventually, the release of the song. This release date is yet to be determined, with the NERVO camp still in discussion with the label. All proceeds from the track will go to Hopeland, and Liv assures that this collaboration is “just the beginning” of NERVO’s partnership with the organization. “We’re going to continue with that and keep doing more,” she said.

Both parties believe this expanded campaign will help bring attention to the world of dance and beyond, helping people better understand a massive issue often hidden in an ordinary site, and then use Hopeland as a resource to find out. how to help support organizations focused on its resolution.

According to them, all of this will be much easier to accomplish with a track that you can really dance to.

“A lot of songs about these kinds of issues are kind of corny,” says Evans. “So how do we create something that continues to engage people on global issues so they don’t just check in? That’s where it’s been really great – with these guys who are so creative and finding ways to engage people who are really confronting, but with a song that’s also really hitting.

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News from across the Canton area https://alabamabluegrass.org/news-from-across-the-canton-area/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 09:59:12 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/news-from-across-the-canton-area/ Festival Props and Pistons AKRON – The Props and Pistons Festival will be held from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and August 14 at Akron Fulton International Airport, 1600 Triplett Blvd. The festival features flight demonstrations, aircraft exhibits, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) activities, airplane tours, and airplane rides. The dozens of exhibits […]]]>

Festival Props and Pistons

AKRON – The Props and Pistons Festival will be held from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and August 14 at Akron Fulton International Airport, 1600 Triplett Blvd.

The festival features flight demonstrations, aircraft exhibits, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) activities, airplane tours, and airplane rides. The dozens of exhibits range from WWII warbirds to current military, commercial and specialty aircraft. There will be a car show on Saturday, free flight simulators, a children’s play area, live music and food trucks.

Free parking and shuttles will be available at marked car parks near Derby Downs. For more information, visit www.flyohio.org or Facebook.com/flyohio.

Palace monster party

CANTON – The Palace Theatre, 605 Market Ave. N, will host the Monster Bash: Bela Lugosi Film Festival and Expo on Friday and Saturday.

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The Greencastle-Antrim community is ready for Old Home Week https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-greencastle-antrim-community-is-ready-for-old-home-week/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 09:03:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/the-greencastle-antrim-community-is-ready-for-old-home-week/ A tradition that dates back 120 years to the Old Boys Reunion of 1902 returns to the Greencastle-Antrim community with the 41st Triennial Old House Week which kicks off on Saturday August 6th and runs until Saturday August 13th. The celebration lasted every three years through two World Wars and the Great Depression. The three-year […]]]>
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Grand Rapids to celebrate Hispanic culture through an annual festival – Grand Valley Lanthorn https://alabamabluegrass.org/grand-rapids-to-celebrate-hispanic-culture-through-an-annual-festival-grand-valley-lanthorn/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 19:00:01 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/grand-rapids-to-celebrate-hispanic-culture-through-an-annual-festival-grand-valley-lanthorn/ The 44th Annual Grand Rapids Hispanic Festival is set to take place for the first time since 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic and will once again be a space where the community comes together through music, food and dance. The festival will start on August 5, 2022 and will take place over three days. […]]]>

The 44th Annual Grand Rapids Hispanic Festival is set to take place for the first time since 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic and will once again be a space where the community comes together through music, food and dance.

The festival will start on August 5, 2022 and will take place over three days.

Grand Rapids is home to approximately 33,000 Hispanic Americans, and the Grand Rapids Hispanic Festival celebrates this deeply rooted culture.

The festival is a fundraiser organized by The Hispanic Center, a nonprofit organization founded in 1978 with a mission to provide social care and stability to Hispanic communities in Michigan. The center strives to provide resources such as grants and educational opportunities for individuals.

However, this event aims to engage everyone in a multitude of performances.

Grand Rapids Hispanic Festival communications director Elizabeth Hickel said this year the event will have more groups and activities than in previous years and everyone is welcome to participate. Groups will come from various countries in South America and Mexico to offer their own styles of musical performances.

“There will be a catalog of Latin musical bands and groups who will present their different representations of storytelling through their music,” Hickel said.

On the first day of the event, various bands will welcome the audience with their musical styles. Some of the bands that perform include Tributo a Mana, Arkangel R-15 and Sonora Tropicana. Many of these groups develop a fusion of traditional Hispanic music with other genres.

For example, Tributo a Mana is a Chicago, Illinois-based band specializing in classic and modern rock as well as traditional Latin music. Additionally, Arkangel R-15 is a regional Mexican band founded by Jesus Navarro in Las Varas, Nayarit, specializing in the Technobanda genre. Technobanda takes regional Mexican music and replaces some instruments like synthesizers. The R-15 also refers to an assault rifle known in the banda mafia music genre.

In addition to the more modern elements of the festival’s musical performances, there are traditional dances. One tradition is a Mexican folk dance that is often referred to as “the national dance of Mexico”. This dance is commonly done between a man and a woman and celebrates romantic courtship.

“It’s a traditional Mexican dance that has many forms throughout Latin history,” Hickel said. “For example, the most popular folk dance is the Tapatío jarabe, which people like to call the Mexican hat dance.”

However, this dance was not so openly celebrated. At the beginning of the 19th century, the Spanish colonizers banned the practice of this dance due to its sexually suggestive nature. There was a resurgence of this dance after Mexican independence in 1821 and is now a central part of the culture.

The integration of new and traditional cultural elements aims to make the festival an experience that connects participants to the past, present and future of the community’s heritage.

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Families attend back-to-school celebration in Bay St. Louis https://alabamabluegrass.org/families-attend-back-to-school-celebration-in-bay-st-louis/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 02:48:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/families-attend-back-to-school-celebration-in-bay-st-louis/ BAY ST. Louis, Miss. (WLOX) – The nonprofit organization Retrofit held a back-to-school celebration for families at MLK Park in Bay St. Louis. Community leaders have helped organize an event for the children to enjoy before they start school next week. The celebration included music, food, and each child left home with a backpack full […]]]>

BAY ST. Louis, Miss. (WLOX) – The nonprofit organization Retrofit held a back-to-school celebration for families at MLK Park in Bay St. Louis.

Community leaders have helped organize an event for the children to enjoy before they start school next week. The celebration included music, food, and each child left home with a backpack full of school supplies. Volunteer Candace Johnson said this is the first year the organization has returned after a two-year hiatus due to COVID.

“It’s the first year that we have been back in the park and the children are running, playing and jumping. Food, fun and games,” Johnson said.

A few months ago, local leaders added a new splashpad to the park. Bryson Jones, 10, said the new addition to the park has helped him stay cool over the summer holidays.

“We just came here to have fun. It’s hot outside and I just came here to have fun,” Jones said.

The volunteers also distributed bags filled with toiletries for the elderly.

The organization, The Village, also hosted a 3-on-3 basketball tournament for kids. President Leo Hawkins said they would continue to organize events for children in the community.

“I have an eleven year old son and I want him to grow up in a good community. I want him to have opportunities, so it’s kind of selfish, but at the same time I’m giving back,” Hawkins said.

The Retrofit organization is hosting a free movie night on August 20 at MLK Park.

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Copyright 2022 WLOX. All rights reserved.

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Laura Petillo appointed Manager of Music Programs at Count Basie Center Academy of the Arts https://alabamabluegrass.org/laura-petillo-appointed-manager-of-music-programs-at-count-basie-center-academy-of-the-arts/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 01:18:25 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/laura-petillo-appointed-manager-of-music-programs-at-count-basie-center-academy-of-the-arts/ RED BANK, NJ — The Count Basie Center For The Arts has appointed longtime violinist and string teacher Laura Petillo to serve as director of music programs for its Academy of Arts and the Count Basie Center’s Monmouth Conservatory of Music. Petillo’s history at the Monmouth Conservatory – and as a musician – is storied. […]]]>

RED BANK, NJ — The Count Basie Center For The Arts has appointed longtime violinist and string teacher Laura Petillo to serve as director of music programs for its Academy of Arts and the Count Basie Center’s Monmouth Conservatory of Music.

Petillo’s history at the Monmouth Conservatory – and as a musician – is storied. At the age of 12, his father, Patrick Appello, himself a lifelong musician and professor at the Conservatory, encouraged him to take lessons with its founders, Irina and Vladic Kovalsky. The nonprofit Conservatory was donated to the Basie Center as part of Kovalsky’s 2017 retreat.

“My early years at the Conservatory gave me a high-quality classical musical education and so much more,” says Petillo. “The advice given to me by the Kovalskys, as well as my first music teacher, my father, gave me confidence, discipline and a passion for music that have accompanied me throughout my life – values ​​that I have always held. intention to instill and strengthen with our students moving forward.

“My goal is for our music programs to provide exciting programs for students from all backgrounds,” added Petillo, “as well as opportunities for young musicians to share their talents and creativity with the local community and beyond.”

In addition to directing the Conservatory, Petillo will manage music-based offerings as part of the Basie Center’s education department. Programs such as Stormy Singers, a preschool choral program at Red Bank Elementary School, the Count Basie Center Gospel Choir, and music-based classes and workshops at the Count Basie Center Academy of the Arts will all be under the guardianship of Petillo.


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“Laura not only brings a musical pedigree to our programs, but also a story,” said Samantha Giustiniani, Senior Director of Education and Outreach, Count Basie Center for the Arts. “The fact that her musical upbringing led her to pursue a career in teaching is not lost on us: Laura embodies excellence, hard work, passion and the rewards one can feel when exposed to to the arts at an early age.”

Petillo’s curriculum vitae in music and education is a veritable concentrate of accomplishments; later this year, she will earn her doctorate in educational leadership from Monmouth University, where she completed her master’s degree in early childhood education in 2020. A longtime resident of Jersey Shore, she attended the school Catholic Saint Mary’s and Holy Trinity as a child, moving to the Ocean Township district for middle school, then Red Bank Regional High School. During these years, she performed in all three tiers of the New Jersey Youth Symphony Orchestra, as well as with the Red Bank Regional Chamber Ensemble, and on the College of New Jersey All-American Youth In Concert Band tour. in Eastern Europe. In 2008 she was Concert Master of the Rutgers Sinfornia Orchestra and performed as Baroque Violin Principal with the New York Continuo Collective. Petillo graduated in 2011 from Mason Gross and Douglass colleges at Rutgers University.

“I came to appreciate the Basie Center as a non-profit organization interested in improving its community through the power of the arts,” says Petillo. “It’s inspiring to have the opportunity to be a part of these efforts, as well as incorporating important elements including social-emotional learning, the importance of social justice, sustainability and other innovations. that I have learned that can have a profound impact on education.”

Information about private and group instruction at the Monmouth Conservatory, as well as music and performing arts lessons at the Count Basie Center Academy of the Arts, is available at www.theBASIE.org/academy and www.theBASIE.org/academy. monmouthconservatory.org.

For more information about the Count Basie Center for the Arts, contact Jonathan Vena at (732) 224-8778 x 107 or [email protected]


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