Music organization – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:59:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://alabamabluegrass.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music organization – Alabama Bluegrass http://alabamabluegrass.org/ 32 32 Black-led advocacy group lobbies to reclaim Portland’s former Albina Arts Center https://alabamabluegrass.org/black-led-advocacy-group-lobbies-to-reclaim-portlands-former-albina-arts-center/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:02:55 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/black-led-advocacy-group-lobbies-to-reclaim-portlands-former-albina-arts-center/ Black-led advocacy group Don’t Shoot Portland is working to reclaim the former Albina Arts Center, once a major cultural center for black communities in north and northeast Portland. Located at 8 NE Killingsworth St., the center offered arts, music and cultural programs to residents of the historically Black Albina neighborhood from the early 1960s. Don’t […]]]>

Black-led advocacy group Don’t Shoot Portland is working to reclaim the former Albina Arts Center, once a major cultural center for black communities in north and northeast Portland.

Located at 8 NE Killingsworth St., the center offered arts, music and cultural programs to residents of the historically Black Albina neighborhood from the early 1960s.

Don’t Shoot Portland held a press conference on December 20 as part of a campaign to reclaim the former Albina Arts Center, a major cultural hub for black communities in north and northeast Portland.

Mika martinez

This month, Don’t Shoot Portland executives demanded that the building be returned to a nonprofit run by and for the Black Portlanders. The group alleges that the state and the Oregon Community Foundation, which currently oversees the building, missed a process to return the historic site to the community and left the property to decay.

“Without an arts center, we are truly a community that truly has no voice and no pulse,” artist and educator Isaka Shamsud-Din said at a press conference on December 20.

Don’t Shoot Teressa Raiford of Portland said that until recently the group rented two different units in the building. He moved during the pandemic, in part because of poor maintenance, including a chipping ceiling and broken floors.

“There has been a lack of investment in the building,” said Raiford. “Why not allow a community agency like ours, or anyone else interested, to buy the property so that we can put it back into the hands of our community? “

Raiford said she hopes to convert the space into a resource center for the Black Portlanders.

“We basically want to restore it so that we can store archives and community experiences, artwork, photos, information, documents,” she said. “We don’t have a black cultural resource center here in Portland. We need a place that can do that kind of welcome and preservation work.

The building was acquired by the Albina Women’s League Foundation in the late 1960s. In 2015, the Oregon Department of Justice, which is responsible for overseeing state charities, took control of the building after allegations that one of the foundation’s executives embezzled funds.

The Oregon Department of Justice assigned a court-appointed receiver to find a non-profit organization to acquire the building. The receiver selected a group called the Black Investment Consortium for Economic Progress, according to court records. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to a request for more information about the arrangement.

But records show that the Black Investment Consortium for Economic Progress – or BICEP – was not incorporated as a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit at the time, and the Oregon Community Foundation was therefore chosen to supervise the building. This foundation is a non-profit organization that distributes over $ 100 million per year in grants and scholarships. Its leaders have promised to center racial equity. A 2016 agreement between the court-appointed receiver and the Oregon Community Foundation sent to the OPB states that BICEP would receive ownership of the Albina neighborhood after BICEP is recognized by the IRS as an “organization. qualified charity ”.

But former BICEP members say the consortium has since disbanded. Kristen Chambers, lawyer for Don’t Shoot Portland, said their group still hasn’t had a chance to acquire the building.

“It’s not just that they didn’t meet the building’s criteria,” Chambers said. “The whole process of rehousing this historic and cultural building took place almost behind closed doors. “

Chambers said that in 2019, Don’t Shoot Portland executives approached the Oregon Department of Justice to acquire the building, but their offer was rejected.

“Don’t Shoot has a community orientation. It is already at the service of the community, already at work in the neighborhood. They basically say here, “We’re the charity you’re looking for,” Chambers said.

A spokesperson for the Oregon Community Foundation said it was keeping the building as “temporary administrative capacity” at the request of the Department of Justice. The foundation plans to hand over ownership of the building soon, although it is not clear who will acquire it.

“The collective goal has always been to return this resource to the community,” wrote Maureen Kenney of the Oregon Community Foundation, in response to a request from OPB.

“In early 2022, in consultation with the Department of Justice, the OCF will convene a community advisory committee to review the interest of nonprofits and recommend a grant recipient,” she said.

But Raiford said she believed the promised community process was pointless at a time when no one else was petitioning for the building.

“It’s such a shame when you say to yourself, ‘hey, we have the resources to get it and we have the capacity to provide it to our community,'” she said. “I’m sure if someone in the white community said, ‘I want to buy this building that I’m in because I see there’s a lack of investment, and I think we can do better,’ they won’t be like, “Let’s see what other white people think about property. “

The foundation said it expects this community process to be completed in 2022.


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First Night Boston returns with music, fireworks and vaccines https://alabamabluegrass.org/first-night-boston-returns-with-music-fireworks-and-vaccines/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:47:52 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/first-night-boston-returns-with-music-fireworks-and-vaccines/ New Years revelers in Boston on Friday night got to see fireworks, hear live music and roll up their sleeves for COVID-19 vaccines and reminders. The annual First Night festival – back after being canceled by the pandemic last year – included a mobile clinic where revelers could get the jab. A Whittier Street Health […]]]>

New Years revelers in Boston on Friday night got to see fireworks, hear live music and roll up their sleeves for COVID-19 vaccines and reminders.

The annual First Night festival – back after being canceled by the pandemic last year – included a mobile clinic where revelers could get the jab. A Whittier Street Health Center vaccine van parked in Copley Square, among food trucks throwing corn dogs and fried dough.

Frederica Williams, chief executive of the health center, thinks it was a smart strategy to offer vaccines in a place that people may have indulged in before deciding to live healthier lives in 2022.

“We wanted to be here because people are ushering in the New Year and making New Year resolutions,” she said. “And we wanted that to be part of the New Year’s resolutions that people make.”

The final vaccine count for the night was not immediately available, but the van drew a long line.

Nearby, bright hats and glitzy glasses festooned a tent where Henry Gardner sold New Years Eve loot. He said crowds were large at similar festivals he worked at throughout the holiday season.

“Corn [the state] such a high number arrived on the COVID count yesterday, ”he said, referring to the 21,137 positive cases reported on December 30, a single-day record in Massachusetts.

Gardner predicted that some people might stay home – even though they were excited about the return of First Night and hope 2022 is the year the pandemic is fully under control.

Ken and Elana Jones were not discouraged. But they hadn’t planned to stay until midnight.

“We’re not the revelers we used to be,” Ken Jones said, adding a joke about turning 30.

The Dorchester couple brought their 2-year-old son, sporting a “2022” wreath he made from construction paper in kindergarten, to view ice sculptures.

“I always went to First Night as a kid,” Elana Jones said. “So when I found out they were having celebrations this year, I wanted to release it.”

Younger Jones may not remember Friday’s outing, but his parents said it was special for them after a few rough years.


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Covid tsunami will lead to collapse of health systems: WHO https://alabamabluegrass.org/covid-tsunami-will-lead-to-collapse-of-health-systems-who/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 05:14:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/covid-tsunami-will-lead-to-collapse-of-health-systems-who/ Tsunami of cases will continue to put immense pressure on exhausted health workers: Tedros Ghebreyesus Geneva: A “tsunami” caused by a variant of Covid threatens to overwhelm health systems, WHO said on Wednesday as AFP data showed cases had increased across the world over the past week to levels never seen before. The highly transmissible […]]]>

Tsunami of cases will continue to put immense pressure on exhausted health workers: Tedros Ghebreyesus

Geneva:

A “tsunami” caused by a variant of Covid threatens to overwhelm health systems, WHO said on Wednesday as AFP data showed cases had increased across the world over the past week to levels never seen before.

The highly transmissible Omicron on Wednesday propelled the United States, France and Denmark to new records, with AFP counting 6.55 million infections reported globally for seven days through Tuesday , demonstrating an unprecedented spread.

The numbers were the highest since the World Health Organization declared a pandemic in March 2020, underscoring the breakneck pace of Omicron transmission, with tens of millions facing a second consecutive year of curbing restrictions New Year’s celebrations.

“I am very concerned that Omicron, being more transmissible, circulating at the same time as Delta, is leading to a tsunami of cases,” WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.

“This is and will continue to put immense pressure on exhausted health workers and health systems on the brink of collapse,” he added.

The wave, currently the worst in Europe, is forcing governments to walk a tightrope between imposing restrictions designed to prevent hospitals from being overwhelmed and the need to keep economies and societies open two years after onset virus at the end of 2019.

The United States, where Omicron is already overwhelming hospitals, recorded its highest ever average of new cases, at 265,427, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Harvard epidemiologist and immunologist Michael Mina tweeted that the tally was probably just the “tip of the iceberg” with the actual number of cases likely much higher, due to a shortage of tests.

But the country also appears to be experiencing a decoupling of infections and severe outcomes from previous waves, officials noted, as evidence accumulates of milder cases under the new variant.

France recorded a new daily record of more than 200,000 cases – more than double the number recorded on Christmas Day – and extended the closure of nightclubs until January.

French police said wearing face masks outdoors would become mandatory again in Paris from Friday for all people over 11, except people inside vehicles, cyclists , users of two-wheeled transport such as scooters and those who practice sport.

Denmark, which currently has the highest rate of infection per person in the world, recorded a new high of 23,228 new infections, which authorities attributed in part to the large number of tests carried out after the Christmas celebrations.

Portugal also recorded a record with almost 27,000 cases reported in 24 hours, while Lebanon recorded 3,150 new infections – its highest daily tally since the vaccine rollout earlier this year.

The number of people hospitalized with Covid in England topped 10,000, the highest total since March, as Britain hit a new record of 183,037 daily cases in the past 24 hours.

No music in Greek bars

Studies suggest that Omicron, now the dominant strain in some countries, carries a reduced risk of sending infected people to hospital, but the WHO has always urged caution.

More than 5.4 million people worldwide have died from Covid-19, but over the past week the death toll has averaged 6,450 per day, according to AFP tally, the most low since October 2020.

In Europe, where more than 3.5 million cases have been recorded in the past seven days, Greece has banned music in bars and restaurants until January 16, including on New Year’s Eve, while Cyprus banned dancing in public places.

Germany has imposed restrictions on sports competitions and closed nightclubs, limiting private gatherings to 10 people vaccinated.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said about 90 percent of coronavirus patients in intensive care units had not had a booster injection, defending his decision not to suppress the festivities.

The heavy use of boosters in England “allows us to move forward with the New Year with the caution that we are,” he said despite further closures in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

Canceled New Years Eve

Armed police in Jingxi in southern China, near the border with Vietnam, marched four suspected Covid rule violators through the streets, state media reported, a practice that has been banned but which has resurfaced in the fight to impose a zero Covid policy.

The mayor of Mexico City has canceled the capital’s massive New Year’s celebrations after an increase in cases.

In Ukraine, three people have died after a candle lit by a hospital worker in memory of a patient who died from the virus sparked a fire in an intensive care unit in the western town of Kosiv.

(Except for the title, this story was not edited by NDTV staff and is posted from a syndicated feed.)


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BTS: WHO chief contacts RM, Jin and Suga after testing positive for Covid-19, wishes them a speedy recovery https://alabamabluegrass.org/bts-who-chief-contacts-rm-jin-and-suga-after-testing-positive-for-covid-19-wishes-them-a-speedy-recovery/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 13:59:02 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/bts-who-chief-contacts-rm-jin-and-suga-after-testing-positive-for-covid-19-wishes-them-a-speedy-recovery/ BTS members RM, Jin and Suga tested positive for Covid-19 earlier this weekend. While RM and Suga did not show any symptoms, Big Hit Music confirmed that Jin had mild symptoms. After the agency confirmed his diagnosis, the director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus contacted members of BTS on Twitter. […]]]>

BTS members RM, Jin and Suga tested positive for Covid-19 earlier this weekend. While RM and Suga did not show any symptoms, Big Hit Music confirmed that Jin had mild symptoms.

After the agency confirmed his diagnosis, the director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus contacted members of BTS on Twitter. He hoped the trio would recover soon and reminded everyone to get the shot.

“Dear @BTS_twt Namjoon, Jin & Yoongi, get good rest and feel better soon! 낫길 바랄 게요 (hope you get well soon). It is so important that everyone take precautions: wear a mask well adjusted, keep a safe distance, avoid poorly ventilated and overcrowded spaces, clean hands and get vaccinated when it’s your turn, ”he tweeted.

Fans thanked Dr Tedros for his tweet and prayed for the speedy recovery of RM, Jin and Suga. They also joined him in urging other fans to get vaccinated and take the necessary precautions.

Dr Tedros has often tweeted about BTS. Earlier this year, when BTS members were appointed South Korea’s Special Presidential Envoys for Future Generations and Culture, Dr Tedros tweeted: “Dear @BTS_twt Namjoon, Jin, Yoongi, Hobi, Jimin, Tae & Jungkook, congratulations on your appointment as #SouthKorea Special Presidential Envoy for Future Generations and Culture! A well-deserved title for a band that uses music and lyrics to bring hope and healing to the world.

Also in 2020, he praised Jimin for breaking the rules of Covid-19 during one of his Vlives for the kids to understand. Sharing a video of the same on Twitter, Dr Tedros said: “What a very thoughtful post from @BTS_twt Jimin – (thank you)! Children are indeed affected by the # COVID19 restrictions, we must do our best to help them understand the situations, support them and comfort them. Together, we will end this pandemic. #Be useful.”

Also Read: BTS: V Gets Sweet Review For Its Song Christmas Tree From J-Hope; the singer thanks our beloved summer team

Big Hit Music assured fans that they are doing everything to help RM, Jin and Suga recover. They also added that the members had not been in contact since returning from the United States.



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Chucky Thompson found music everywhere https://alabamabluegrass.org/chucky-thompson-found-music-everywhere/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 21:20:26 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/chucky-thompson-found-music-everywhere/ The image goes viral, or as viral as it gets in the summer of 2007. We see the body of a gigantic silver-back mountain gorilla hoisted high on crisscrossing branches and carried by at least 14 men through the bush. The dead gorilla is tied with vines to secure its arms and legs. Its prodigious […]]]>

The image goes viral, or as viral as it gets in the summer of 2007. We see the body of a gigantic silver-back mountain gorilla hoisted high on crisscrossing branches and carried by at least 14 men through the bush. The dead gorilla is tied with vines to secure its arms and legs. Its prodigious belly is also surrounded by vines and its mouth is stuffed with leaves. The photograph seems to be the end of a film whose beginning we do not yet know. It weighs 500 pounds – a black and silver planet in the middle of the green. Although we can’t see this part, some of the men are crying.

The gorilla’s name is Senkwekwe, and he is well known to porters, many of whom are park rangers who call him “brother”. He is the dominant male of a family called the Kabirizis. (The American primatologist Dian Fossey was instrumental in the study of the complex dynamics of these family units.) They are a troop accustomed to humans: gentle, curious, cheerful and often happy to welcome visitors, tourists. and the rangers who protect them. Now, here in their home range, on the slope of the Mikeno volcano in Virunga National Park in eastern Congo, many of them have been murdered by armed militiamen trying to scare the rangers away and take control. from old-growth forest to charcoal. manufacturing. In a solemn procession, the dead gorillas are taken to the rangers field station.

The photograph, taken by Brent Stirton for Newsweek, appears in newspapers and magazines around the world, alerting others to the issues park wardens know so well: the need to protect gorilla habitat, the bloody battle for resources (gold, petroleum, charcoal, tin and poached animals), the destabilizing presence of armed rebel groups as well as the Congolese army within the borders of the park. Although the park is a World Heritage Site, more than 175 park rangers have been killed here over the past 25 years. What is also not visible in this photo is that only one gorilla survives the massacre, a baby found next to its slain mother, one of Senkwekwe’s companions, trying to suckle her breast.

The baby – a 2-month-old, five-pound, adorable female – is dehydrated and near death herself, so a young ranger named Andre Bauma instinctively places her against her bare chest for warmth and comfort and dabs her gums and his tongue with milk. He brings her back to life, sleeps, feeds and plays with her around the clock – for days, then months, then years – until the young gorilla seems convinced that he, Andre Bauma, is his. mother.

André Bauma also seems convinced.

Senkwekwe, Ndakasi’s father, after being found dead in 2007.
Brent Stirton

The baby gorilla, begotten of murdered parents, is called Ndakasi (en-DA-ka-see). Because no orphan mountain gorilla has ever been successfully returned to the wild before, she spends her days in a park sanctuary with a group of other orphan gorillas and their keepers, swinging from the tall branches, munching on wild celery, even learning to finger paint, mostly oblivious to the fact that she lives in one of the most contested places on the planet. She is exuberant and a ham and demands to be carried by her mother, Andre Bauma, even as she grows to 140 pounds and he almost gives way under her weight.

One day in April 2019, another ranger takes a selfie with Ndakasi and her best friend, Ndeze, both standing in the background, one with a protruding stomach and both with whassup expressions. The cheeky blunder on humans is almost too perfect, and the image is posted to Facebook with the caption “Another day at the office. …”

The photo explodes immediately, because we love that stuff – us and them together in one picture. The idea of ​​mountain gorillas imitating us for the camera skips borders and species. We are more alike than different, and it appeals to our imaginations: ourselves existing with a fascinating, perhaps more innocent, version of ourselves.

Mountain gorillas exhibit dozens of vocalizations, and Bauma always vocalizes with Ndakasi singing and growling and the growling belching that signals contentment and security. Whenever there are gunshots near the shrine, Bauma makes sounds to calm Ndakasi. He himself lost his father in the Congo War. Now he tells her it’s just another day in their simple Eden.

“You have to justify why you are on this earth,” Bauma says in a documentary. “The gorillas are the reason why I am here.”

A park warden taking a selfie with Ndakasi and a friend in 2019.
Mathieu Shamavu / Virunga National Park

Ndakasi turns 14 in 2021 and spends his days healing Ndeze, clinging to Bauma, vocalizing with him. Mountain gorillas can live up to 40 years, but one spring day she gets sick. She loses weight, then some of her hair. It is a mysterious disease which increases and decreases, for six months. Vets from an organization called Gorilla Doctors arrive and, during repeated visits, administer a series of medical interventions that appear to make small improvements. Just when it looks like she is going to recover, however, Ndakasi takes a bad turn.

Now his gaze only reaches right in front of her. The wonder and playfulness seem to have faded, her concentration having turned inward. Brent Stirton, who has returned to the Virunga about every 18 months since photographing the massacre of the Ndakasi family, is visiting and taking pictures judiciously. The doctors help Ndakasi to sit down at the table where they are treating her. She vomits into a bucket, is anesthetized. Bauma stays with her all the time; finally, she is taken to her enclosure and lies down on a green sheet. Bauma is lying on the bare floor next to her.

At one point, Bauma leans against the wall, then she crawls onto her knees, with the energy she has left, rests her head on his chest and sinks into him, placing her foot on his foot. “I think that’s when I could almost see the light leaving his eyes,” Stirton said. “It was a private moment no different from being with a dying child. I made five frames with respect and walked out.

One of the latest photographs goes viral, spreading the sad news of Ndakasi’s death to the world. What do we see when we look? Pain. Trial. Death. And we also see great love. Our capacity to receive and to give. It is a fleeting moment of transcendence, a gorilla in its mother’s arms, two creatures united to make one. It’s deeply humbling, which the natural world bestows, if we allow it.

Bauma’s colleagues draw a tight circle around him in order to prevent him from having to talk about Ndakasi’s passing, though he issues a statement praising his “gentle nature and intelligence,” adding: “I loved him. like a child”. Then he goes back to work. Death is everywhere in Virunga and there are more orphan gorillas to care for. Or maybe it’s the other way around.

Michael Paterniti is a contributing writer for the magazine.


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High Desert Chamber Music Names Spotlight Chamber Players Participants https://alabamabluegrass.org/high-desert-chamber-music-names-spotlight-chamber-players-participants/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 22:38:39 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/high-desert-chamber-music-names-spotlight-chamber-players-participants/ BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) – High Desert Chamber Music announced Monday that the following students have been selected for this year’s Spotlight Chamber Players program: Nicholas Oncken (violin), Ezra Oncken (violin) and Matthias Santucci (piano). This program provides regular high-level chamber music instruction to aspiring young musicians. “After a one-year hiatus, I am delighted to return […]]]>

BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) – High Desert Chamber Music announced Monday that the following students have been selected for this year’s Spotlight Chamber Players program: Nicholas Oncken (violin), Ezra Oncken (violin) and Matthias Santucci (piano). This program provides regular high-level chamber music instruction to aspiring young musicians.

“After a one-year hiatus, I am delighted to return to work with talented young musicians from our region,” said General Manager Isabelle Senger. “You can plan to hear the band featured at events later this season.”

Auditions are held annually and are open to students of violin, viola, cello, bass, and piano with at least three years of private study and intermediate to advanced playing levels. This year’s students come from the private teaching studios of Kara Eubanks and Janet Smith.

High Desert Chamber Music’s mission is to bring world-class chamber music and musicians to central Oregon. Now in its fourteenth season, HDCM presents an acclaimed series of classical chamber music concerts in central Oregon, ranging from piano duets to string sextets. As the first and leading chamber music organization in the region, HDCM offers an exciting roster of professional performing artists. They are proud to be a local organization with a national level of excellence.

Title sponsors HDCM 2021-2022 include Miller Lumber, German Master Tech, Hayden Homes, Pine Tavern Restaurant, Stephanie Ruiz and Jordan Grandlund Group at Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty, and Newstalk KBND and 101.7 Radio. Additional support provided by the Tower Theater Foundation and BendBroadband.


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Rockford Midtown District ventures to connect, inspire https://alabamabluegrass.org/rockford-midtown-district-ventures-to-connect-inspire/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 06:01:21 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/rockford-midtown-district-ventures-to-connect-inspire/ Jessica Fletsch, 20, of Rockford, watches a hanging set created by local artists during a preview party at Inscape Collective, Thursday, December 2, 2021, at 201 7th Street in Midtown Rockford, Illinois (Susan Moran / Rockford Register Star via PA) Susan moran PA ROCKFORD, Illinois. A group of local artists, artisans, musicians and activists have […]]]>

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Jessica Fletsch, 20, of Rockford, watches a hanging set created by local artists during a preview party at Inscape Collective, Thursday, December 2, 2021, at 201 7th Street in Midtown Rockford, Illinois (Susan Moran / Rockford Register Star via PA)

PA

A group of local artists, artisans, musicians and activists have launched an effort to bring items ethically produced by local entrepreneurs and products from developing countries to the former Just Goods Fair Trade store in the Midtown area of ​​Rockford.

Members of the organization – known as the Inscape Collective – also envision the space as a focal point for music, art and educational programs connecting people from diverse backgrounds, reports the Rockford Register Star.

“We decided to try and start a social business with a mission to create a secular space where people from diverse groups – especially women – looking for connection and inspiration can engage, thrive and make an impact. social, ”said Shiraz, co-founder of Inscape Collective. Auntie.

Inscape Collective is started by Initial Thought Inc., a women-owned, black personalization company based in Rockford, and Jhoole Inc., a not-for-profit women’s empowerment cooperative company in Maheshwar, India, which produces a line of sports and leisure clothing.

“Jhoole is a fair trade, non-profit social enterprise,” said Hannah Warren, founder of the company and a native of Rockford. “The goal is to give the women there a living wage so that they can invest in education and break the cycle of chronic poverty. They do a lot of outsourcing to India with a number of different brands and then they have their own line of sportswear that incorporates traditional hand dyeing and block printing techniques, which use carved blocks. wood to achieve these ornate patterns. “

Initial Thought Inc. was co-founded by Rachel Rainey, of Loves Park, and Melissa Simmons, of Pingree Grove.

“We specialize in customizing pretty much everything from pillows and cups to t-shirts,” Rainey said, “we made golf bags and Christmas decorations. We’re just trying to bring people’s ideas to life.

Inscape Collective members said the Midtown location is strategic for the organization’s mission, which is to provide economic, creative and self-fulfillment opportunities to people from all walks of life in the Rockford area.

Just Goods Fair Trade Store closed in 2019 after 14 years of activity.


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Complete list of winners – Billboard https://alabamabluegrass.org/complete-list-of-winners-billboard/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 18:30:03 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/complete-list-of-winners-billboard/ Smokey Robinson, Berry Gordy, Jr., Cicely Tyson and Ray Charles will be honored at the 2022 Black Music and Entertainment Walk of Fame awards ceremony on February 17 during Black History Month in Atlanta. The four entertainment titans named founders in 2022. In addition, the ceremony is expected to recognize Lionel Richie as a mainstream […]]]>

Smokey Robinson, Berry Gordy, Jr., Cicely Tyson and Ray Charles will be honored at the 2022 Black Music and Entertainment Walk of Fame awards ceremony on February 17 during Black History Month in Atlanta.

The four entertainment titans named founders in 2022. In addition, the ceremony is expected to recognize Lionel Richie as a mainstream artist, Prince as a mainstream male, Mary J. Blige as a mainstream woman, New Edition as a mainstream male group, TLC as a mainstream girl group publicp, Donald Lawrence as male gospel, Yolanda Adams as female gospel, Baby and CeCe Winans as gospel band, Snoop Dogg as male hip-hop, Lauryn Hill as female hip-hop and Tyler Perry as mainstream tycoon.

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See the latest videos, graphics and news

See the latest videos, graphics and news

For the first time, the organization unveils its favorite category of international fans, in which Bob Marley and Fela Kuti are in contention. The category allow fans to to participate through to throwing vote for their favorite artist.

According to a statement, the ceremony aims to honor “pioneering artists, iconic artists and luminaries who have impacted both black culture and the community at large.”

The awards are presented by the founder of the Cather organizationine Brewton and Erica Thomas of the Georgia Entertainment Caucus and Demmette Guidry and Michael T. Mauldin of the Black American Music Association.

The 2022 Inductee Walk of Fame is slated to be installed in downtown Atlanta.

Revealed in June, pformer founding inductees were James Brown, Otis Redding, Quincy Jones and Stevie Wonder. Other winners included Michael Jackson (inherited artist) and Beyoncé (dominant female).

For more information visit theblackwalkoffame.com.


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Innova Recordings reinvents the “record company” https://alabamabluegrass.org/innova-recordings-reinvents-the-record-company/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 05:02:12 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/innova-recordings-reinvents-the-record-company/ Innova Recordings, the in-house record label of the American Composers Forum (ACF), has announced its first nationwide call for recording artists and their projects. The national appeal and its curation process will provide a new, more transparent and fair process for artists from diverse musical backgrounds and approaches that will be supported by the label. […]]]>

Innova Recordings, the in-house record label of the American Composers Forum (ACF), has announced its first nationwide call for recording artists and their projects.

The national appeal and its curation process will provide a new, more transparent and fair process for artists from diverse musical backgrounds and approaches that will be supported by the label. The Sorel Organization will provide funding and significant support to artists from genres under-represented on the label.

Innova Recordings is evolving to become more than a label and the new model will foster collaborations with artists throughout the project recording process, from conception to release to promotion.

A panel of curators who reflect diverse backgrounds, races, genre identities and musical approaches will select projects for the label and there will be no fees for artists to apply and – new to this model – no administrative fees will be required to apply. the artists selected for the label. The selected artists will receive support from innova for the production and promotion of their music free of charge every step of the way.

In a statement, ACF President and CEO Vanessa Rose said, “For nearly 40 years, innova Recordings has served as a recording label for an incredible number of artists. We know how precious having a recording that is both well produced and promoted is for every artist, as well as how many obstacles there are to getting it. We hope this dynamic change will provide a transformative platform for artists we missed on recordings by making the label more accessible and involving more people in the recruitment and decision-making process. We are grateful for the Sorel Organization’s partnership in making this possible.


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Special Olympians hit the right notes with new Corner Brook choir https://alabamabluegrass.org/special-olympians-hit-the-right-notes-with-new-corner-brook-choir/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 09:30:00 +0000 https://alabamabluegrass.org/special-olympians-hit-the-right-notes-with-new-corner-brook-choir/ Rebecca Hampton and Sarah Flight are members of Special Olympics and also love to sing. They have been friends since they were children. (Bernice Hillier / CBC) Choirs across the country can’t wait to perform this holiday season after restrictions from last year’s pandemic, but a western Newfoundland choir can be more enthusiastic than most. […]]]>

Rebecca Hampton and Sarah Flight are members of Special Olympics and also love to sing. They have been friends since they were children. (Bernice Hillier / CBC)

Choirs across the country can’t wait to perform this holiday season after restrictions from last year’s pandemic, but a western Newfoundland choir can be more enthusiastic than most.

The group, made up mostly of Special Olympics athletes, will perform for the first time on Sunday.

“I couldn’t wait to be a part of it,” said Rebecca Hampton, 23, who has been singing since she was a teenager but only competed in the Special Olympics this year.

“Everyone has a talent, and they should appreciate that special talent,” said Hampton.

The Special Olympics organization provides sports opportunities for youth and adults with intellectual disabilities. For some of the people involved, shifting their focus away from moving their bodies to using their vocal cords to sing songs is something entirely new.

Melanie Gosse and her choir of Special Olympics athletes and friends in Corner Brook. (Bernice Hillier / CBC)

Make a dream come true

It was a special Olympian Sarah Flight, 22, who initiated the idea of ​​a choir.

Flight has been participating in the Special Olympics for the past five years and also enjoys taking singing lessons with her music teacher Melanie Gosse.

“I knew a lot of other athletes who also loved to sing,” Flight said. “And I kind of mentioned to Melanie that there would be people who might be interested in doing that, if we just asked them.”

Kid was eager to try it out, and the Born to Fly fundraising concert for Special Olympics started to take shape.

First, Gosse received approval from the local Special Olympics organization, and then approached the athletes about the idea while they were at a bowling practice.

She told them that she would help them prepare two selections to play as a group, including the song Fly by Canadian singer April Lavigne, which has become the anthem of the Special Olympics.

“I brought in a whole bunch of athletes who wanted to sing songs for the show. And I was like, ‘Awesome! This is going to be amazing,’” Gosse said.

Touching a sensitive chord

As the choir rehearses together, it’s easy to sense their enthusiasm for the singing and the fact that they are having a lot of fun doing it.

But Gosse said there were some emotional moments too, like when they first trained together.

“We started singing, and there were a few students who were so thrilled to be so happy to sing and to have this opportunity that they cried,” Gosse said.

Relative Anissa Bennett said she already shed a few tears at the thought of her 12-year-old son Dylan performing in the choir.

“He’s in grade 7 and has never been able to participate in school events like choirs or Christmas concerts. Maybe it could be due to special needs. He wasn’t able to handle it at the time, ”Bennett said.

12-year-old Dylan Bennett will perform for the first time on stage with the Special Olympics Choir. (Bernice Hillier / CBC)

But Dylan Bennett is happy with the opportunity now.

“I love to sing with my friends and I sing well. I train and train every Saturday,” he said.

Dylan’s mother will be one of the proudest members of the audience as her son takes the stage to sing along with his friends.

“I think it’s a perfect opportunity for them… I think it’s time for all of these athletes to shine, my son included,” said Bennett.

Read more about CBC Newfoundland and Labrador



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