Celebrating Black History: Meet Marquise Greene, a young black leader transforming the Dallas Mavs

Marquise Greene always felt like the NBA belonged.

His sporting dreams were born at an early age when his Uncle Dee taught him how to swing a bat, shoot a ball, dress well, and hold his head up while talking. He especially reminded a young Greene to stand firm and proud as a young black man growing up in Paducah, Kentucky.

Uncle Dee was only 10 years older than Greene and looked more like a brother than an uncle, but the love and encouragement he showered his nephew had a profound effect on Greene’s life. Dee was also the first person Greene saw attend college and graduate.

He told his nephew that anything was possible.

“He’s the main reason I got into sports at a young age, being a college athlete himself,” Greene said. “We spent a lot of time together…as a black boy, I can’t tell you how important it was to have a man in my life who could share his experiences with me and teach me right from wrong. .”

Uncle Dee is a great reminder of how much power we all carry. Our words and actions have a significant influence and can change the life trajectory of young people.

This was the case for Greene, and now the student has become the teacher. He is a leader called by the Dallas Mavericks to co-chair the Black Employee Network (BEN). The Employee Resource Group is dedicated to raising awareness in underserved communities in North Texas and aims to raise awareness of black culture within the Mavs organization. BEN also facilitates internal and external educational opportunities for minorities and allies.

Greene has worked for the Dallas Mavericks for the past five years and currently serves as Group Sales Account Manager with the franchise. During the season and on game nights, Greene’s wisdom and guidance play a vital role in helping Dallas Mavericks fans and groups have a memorable game night experience.

Greene particularly enjoys giving time to the community, whether it’s outfitting children with new jackets, cooking meals for the underserved, or learning from BEN members. These are the places where it shines particularly.

His leadership role at BEN is a volunteer position that was appointed by executives. He holds great significance in a Dallas Mavs organization deeply committed to raising the voices and experiences of minorities.

Responsibility doesn’t scare him – if anything Greene knows, he comes from a heritage of fighters.

They set the standard – and now he can carry the torch.

“This is going to sound weird, but what makes me most proud of being a black man is wrestling,” Greene shared. “As black people, we have faced countless hardships and injustices for hundreds of years, and yet we are still here. We are always fighting against fairness. We always fight for inclusion. We always fight for respect. I am proud to be part of a legacy of fighters.

Greene’s grain was fortified there in the rural town of Paducah, Kentucky, a community nestled on the south side of the Ohio River with about 30,000 residents. The quaint town is located between St. Louis and Nashville, and Greene later graduated from Paducah Tilghman High School.

From there, he was motivated to pursue higher education, just as Uncle Dee and Greene set their sights on the University of Louisville.

Greene went to school full time and simultaneously worked as a student assistant in the athletics department. He learned about the internal affairs of the sports world and, instead of pushing him away, it only deepened Greene’s desire to work in the sport. He was particularly drawn to the NBA.

He went on to earn his Bachelor of Science in Sports Administration and a minor in Communications at Louisville. After graduating, he landed a job with the St. Louis Cardinals, and the Dallas Mavericks then signed him in 2017.

Green has grown in the organization since.

Although Greene’s professional sports career got off to a fast start, he said there were no shortcuts in life. He worked tirelessly in college, often for free, and it paid off. Now he is motivated to help other young people pursue their own sporting ambitions.

“The most important trait I think you need to have as a youngster is confidence,” Greene said. “Don’t be afraid to be yourself, trust that you are enough to succeed. Once you understand this, you can enter any space with certainty. With this confidence, you will be able to see yourself more clearly and be able to continue to truly grow and improve in areas that are needed.

February is Black History Month and the Dallas Mavericks are proud to join the NBA in celebrating the extraordinary accomplishments and accomplishments of Black men and women in the organization. Marquise Greene is an exceptional leader and trailblazer who paves the way for future leaders.

In honor of Black History Month, Mavs.com caught up with Greene to learn more about his past and how it propelled him into his future.

GREEN CANOPY
Group sales account manager
Dallas Mavs tenure: 5 years

MAVS.COM: Can you share what you do for the Mavericks for our fans who may not know you? What does a typical week look like in your role?

GREEN : My position here with the Mavericks is a group sales account manager. The main objective is to sell and manage the logistics of the large group outings that we have during our home games. This includes organizing outings and events for businesses, schools, and non-profit organizations, while also assisting outside event planners who wish to use our arena space on game days. My non-playing days are mostly filled with phone calls, emails, and face-to-face meetings in the arena. My play days are filled with the same with the addition of customer visits to the arena and other miscellaneous tasks.

MAVS.COM: Who is a Black player, coach, manager or individual within the Mavs organization that has impacted you the most?

GREEN : I should say Kenny Bunch. Kenny is only slightly older than me, but he acts like he’s a lot older. When I arrived in Dallas, I wasn’t sure what to expect, but Kenny did a great job helping me feel comfortable and acclimate to the city. He always gives me good advice when I need it and I admire the way he conducts himself as a professional and as a man. Whenever I look around, he is always helping someone, and he is truly a servant.

MAVS.COM: Sometimes we chase dreams, other times dreams chase us. Have you always had a desire to work in the NBA – or do you feel like an extraordinary set of circumstances finally pushed you towards a purpose and your current role?

GREEN : I knew that I had always wanted to work in sports and more specifically in the NBA, mainly because of the speed of growth of the league and its diversity. My dream job was to be that top sports agent you’d see on TV from time to time (LOL), but life had other plans. I’ve always been someone who tried to take the opportunities that presented themselves and make the most of them. Even though it was something I thought I didn’t want. So, I wouldn’t say I felt pushed into my current role, but I definitely found purpose in it.

MAVS.COM: Tell me the story of a black leader or family member who believed in you long before you believed in yourself. Who gets your Lifetime Achievement Award?

GREEN : I must say my uncle Dee, who is 10 years older than me and looks more like an older brother than an uncle. He is the main reason I became interested in sports at a young age, being a college athlete himself. We spent a lot of time together, whether it was teaching me to swing a bat, swing a golf club, shoot a ball, dress well, respect and talk to girls, networking with people, etc., he was there. As a black boy, I can’t tell you how important it was to have a man in my life who could share his experiences with me and teach me right from wrong. He was also the first person I saw go to college and graduate. This sparked my interest in pursuing higher education and not being afraid to step out of my comfort zone once I finished high school.

MAVS.COM: What makes you most proud of being a black man? What do you love most about your background, your heritage or your ancestors?

GREEN : This is going to sound weird, but what makes me most proud of being a black man is wrestling. As black people we have faced countless hardships and injustices for hundreds of years and yet we are still here. We always fight for fairness. We always fight for inclusion. We always fight for respect. I am proud to be part of a legacy of fighters. Blacks are special and are the basis of much of what you see today. Whether it’s art, music, sports, politics, we’ve played a vital role in how this world works.

MAVS.COM: If a young person with big dreams was reading this profile, what advice would you give them to get where you are?

GREEN : In my opinion, the most important trait you need to have as a youngster is confidence. Don’t be afraid to be yourself, trust that you are enough to succeed. Once you understand this, you can enter any space with certainty. With this confidence, you will be able to see yourself more clearly and be able to continue to truly grow and improve in the areas that are needed.

MAVS.COM: Finally, we want to know more about you! What do you like to do outside of work?

GREEN : I spend most of my time outside of work exercising, playing basketball and playing golf. I’m definitely a foodie so I like to try new restaurants and Dallas has a lot of different options. I also like to binge watch. I have to say my top shows right now are Ozark, Handmaid’s Tale, Power, Attack on Titan (Anime) and all of the Disney+ Marvel shows.

Thank you, Marquise Greene, for being an outstanding leader and an example to countless people in the Dallas Mavericks organization. You have blazed an amazing path for so many to follow!

To learn more about the Dallas Mavericks initiatives for Black History Month 2022, click here.

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