Here’s how I got a Suave Sync license placement on TikTok


Singer-songwriter Tina Mathieu joined DMN to discuss their sync licensing success, including a recently finalized Suave placement on TikTok. Photo credit: Olivier Bergeron

Having recently placed her music in a Suave ad specially crafted for TikTok, folk-soul singer and songwriter Tina Mathieu spoke to Digital Music News to discuss the deal and how social media is fundamentally changing the space. synchronization license.

The following was created in conjunction with Songtradr, as part of a larger partnership focused on the sync license space. Be sure to check out our ongoing coverage of this rapidly growing industry. here.

Veteran singer-songwriter Mathieu has formed a “positive pop duo” called True Fiction with longtime producer Max Allyn last year, and the band “Live It 2 ​​The Limit” is leading the creative direction of a Suave spot which as mentioned was made for the abridged video sharing app as opposed to TV.

In the clip of about 23 seconds – the official download including more than 5.4 million views to date – social media influencer Ashley Nocera buys new Suave hair care product from Target, which also contributed to the publicity. Nocera (which has around 3.4 million Instagram Followers) then tests the item and, visibly satisfied with its quality, rushes to Target to stock up.

“It was really cool when this one came up,” Mathieu told DMN of his placement in the multi-brand ad. “It was fun being a beauty ad and seeing how they put it together with Target. It was exciting to see it all come together.

And from a technical standpoint, Mathieu noted that the campaign, in stark contrast to TV and movie placements, provided detailed audience statistics – one of the many by-products associated with ads. designed for social media.

“What’s cool about it is that you can actually see the metrics of how many people have seen it and watched it. It’s interesting, all the advertising space is changing, ”said the creator, whose work has appeared on NBC, TLC, Bravo, and Lifetime, to name a few.

“Things change with royalties and so on on the backend for things like these social media platforms,” she said, clarifying that social media sync deals paychecks can compete ( and even exceed) those of television placements. “I think there are a lot of issues to be solved, and I think it’s interesting to kind of have a place and a role in the way advertising changes and evolves.”

Elaborating on the role it plays in the evolution of advertising, Mathieu – who is about to release an EP titled This blue must pass Thursday, November 18 – highlighted the difference between the TV and social media royalty structure.

“In terms of being on TikTok versus the actual TV commercial, like I said, there are some interesting things going on in the background with the royalties, which is very cool that it’s on TikTok, but I am not sure this is trying to save us in any way it can.

“There are still monetary issues to be addressed, so it will be interesting to see what the difference will be once they sign some of these royalty agreements,” she continued, reiterating that the Social media sync compensation is substantial but will increase as major platforms finalize royalty pacts. “It’s great to have your song in something, but it’s also what we musicians, artists and songwriters do with our lives. Being able to follow money and understand it is also a very big part of it. ”

And on that front, the value of investing in high-engagement mediums like TikTok – where users interact directly with the content – extends beyond the license fees at hand. Real Fiction has already placed “Live It 2 ​​The Limit” in a soon-to-be-released Dove spot – which, along with the Suave commercial, is poised to spark the interest of advertisers and fans alike.

“It was really cool for us artists and musicians to be able to use it as a pied-à-terre – to be like, ‘Hey I got this placement, so now I can get this one and this one. there and the next and become the topic of discussion. And it really helps you grab the next opportunity.

“You never know when you’re going to see him [a placed song] or hear it, or someone will send it to you and say, “Hey, I heard your song about this,” the “Share the sun” creator Mathieu. “Especially when it can be Shazamed, and there are other apps with the same functionality, where it’s like your song is in a commercial or in a movie, and people like it and Shazam. They have instant access to find your song and find your music, which is obviously a bonus for sure.

Of course, the idea that synchronized license placements and their multifaceted effects lay the foundation for future successes has unique significance for artists who are currently seeking to establish a presence in the ever-competitive arena. But Mathieu, touching a point that other professionals have mentioned, said staying authentic and positive is a must for emerging artists – especially amid the inherent temptation to make music that seems to be trending for sync.

“Don’t put yourself in a box. A lot of people when you say, “I’m an artist” or “I’m a songwriter,” they say to you, “Oh, what kind of music do you write? “And immediately you have to choose something,” she explained. “Well, what if I can write this music and I can write folk music, but I can also write pop?” But I also like to write musicals? Don’t feel like you have to choose something to choose something. Do it all, and then you will know what comes to you naturally and organically.

A similar idea, Mathieu concludes, holds true for experienced artists and musicians who are now seeking placements and business results, in a music industry (and advertising industry) that looks decidedly different from what it used to be. ten years ago.

“You’re never too old to make music. There’s that stuff like – especially if you’re female – you must be 25. I do these internships, and I am not 25 years old. People who still want to make music but feel like their time is past, there are so many opportunities to make money making music and fill your soul making music. You can’t really put a gender or an age on it.

With the advice in mind, Mathieu embraces the benefits of social media placements – and takes the previously outlined hang-ups in stride – while remaining mindful of the broader changes her pioneering efforts will bring in the long run.

“There are a lot of unknowns, but I think on the other hand, it will be really beneficial for artists, musicians and writers like me,” she concluded.



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