NPR’s Tim Mak Details NRA Fall in New ‘Misfire’ Book

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For decades, the National Rifle Association has used its strong political influence and lobbying powers to block gun control legislation in the name of the Second Amendment. As she faces internal strife and legal attempts to dissolve the organization, author Tim Mak says the RNApolitical influence is weakening.

The RNA decides he’s far less interested in reaching out to Democrats and moderates than before… taking that kind of culture war approach to increase fundraising and membership. —Tim Mak, author of “Misfire”


Listen: author Tim Mak on the RNAdecreasing influence.


Guest

Tim mak is a survey correspondent for NPR and author of “Misfire: Inside the Downfall of the RNA. “He says that after having had unparalleled influence, the RNA faces hijacking investigations that could lead to its downfall. “Right now a judge is … in court to decide whether the RNA should be completely dissolved, ”he notes.

Mak says it RNA decided to forge an increasingly conservative identity after the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut. “The RNA decides he’s far less interested in reaching out to Democrats and moderates than before… taking that kind of culture warfare approach to increase fundraising and membership. Unable to continue waging the culture war, Mak says Donald Trump’s election in 2016 was “sort of the beginning of the end for the RNA. “

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